Tag Archives: Word made flesh

Third Sunday of Easter

Were Not Our Hearts Burning within Us? 

As two travelers were walking on the road to Emmaus they were talking about the recent events in Jerusalem. A third man joined them on the way and asked them what they were disussing:

He asked them, “What things?” They replied, “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place. Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.”

Then he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures.  (Luke 24:13-27)

We live in a confusing time. We hear and read conflicting information. Even the “expert” analysis often makes little sense. Who are we to believe? Where are we to turn for help in understanding our complex world and its challenging circumstances?

The two travelers walking to Emmaus needed help. They were hearing numerous reports but unsure about what to believe. What they needed was a reliable report with expert interpretation. What they received while on the road was the Word of God interpreted by the Word of God made flesh. Jesus became their guide along the way. Things were starting to make sense for them. They became excited about what they were hearing and beginning to understand.

Today we need Jesus more than ever. We need his words, his wisdom, and his direction for our lives.

Jesus wants to share with us a deeper meaning of his death and resurrection. We need to be attentive to what he is saying. The travelers on the road were eager to hear even more of Jesus:

As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.” So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?”   (Luke 24:28-33)

Jesus imparts wisdom and understanding through his word. He imparts healing and strength through his body and blood which he shares with us during Holy Communion. Do we hunger and thirst for all that he has for us? Are our hearts burning within us as we listen attentively to his word?

We are on the road of life. Our final destination will be determined by how much we receive from our Lord. He is the way, the truth, and the life. He is the gate. He is the door. No one comes to the Father except through him.

The ruler of this age, the enemy of our souls, will do everything he can to distract us and confuse us. His goal is to drown out the Word of God. It is time that we wake up. He controls the media, the entertainment industry, and even some of our churches. What he offers has little value. In fact, it is designed to sap our energy, kill us before our time, and even steal our inheritance in Christ. There is a far better alternative. In the words of the Apostle:

You know that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your ancestors, not with perishable things like silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, like that of a lamb without defect or blemish. He was destined before the foundation of the world, but was revealed at the end of the ages for your sake. Through him you have come to trust in God, who raised him from the dead and gave him glory, so that your faith and hope are set on God.   (1 Peter 1:18-23)

Jesus poured his all for us. In him we have all that we need. The sojourners on the road to Emmaus were blessed to hear from the Lord Jesus himself. But Jesus is still speaking today. He is risen. He is the world made flesh. He is Emmanuel, God with us. Should we not invite him to walk along with us so that we might hear the words of life?

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Christmas Day: Proper III

The Word Made Flesh

The Gospel of John does not have an Infancy narrative as do the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. Rather, John speaks of a time before the birth of the Christ Child. He writes of the One who pre-existed the world and was the very agent of all creation:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

The reading from Hebrews echoes this same theme:

Long ago God spoke to our ancestors in many and various ways by the prophets, but in these last days he has spoken to us by a Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, through whom he also created the worlds. He is the reflection of God’s glory and the exact imprint of God’s very being, and he sustains all things by his powerful word. When he had made purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high, having become as much superior to angels as the name he has inherited is more excellent than theirs.  (Hebrews 1:1-4)

Do we know Jesus beyond the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes? Many of His own Jewish people did not comprehend who Jesus was and is:

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him.  (John 1:10-11)

The remarkable thing is that the creator God entered His own the world of His own creation on our behalf. In Jesus, God made himself vulnerable to humankind in order to reveal his true nature and heart:

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:14)

As prophesied by Isaiah, God made himself visible through demonstrations of his power and might. Lastly, he demonstrated his victory of the power of sin and death through the resurrection of his Son which brought the opportunity of salvation for the whole world:

The Lord has made bare His holy arm
In the eyes of all the nations;
And all the ends of the earth shall see
The salvation of our God.   (Isaiah 52:10)

God made himself visible that all the world might see his glory. However, we are now living in an ever darkening world. It has become incorrect to celebrate the birth of Christ. We are not to pray in our schools. We are told not to give testimony. Jesus must be folded into other religions in order to be acceptable. Why is that? The world wants us to hide the glory of God and his plan for salvation. We know that worldly people are hiding from God because they do not understand that he died for them. Are we to hide from God as well?

Now is the time for what may be the greatest missionary work of all. Are we up to the task? We are not alone in carrying out this mission. God is Emmanuel. He is with us in our struggles. God became flesh for us so that we might become part of his flesh. In the Incarnation, God took us our flesh. Now we are to take up his nature. John reminds us again:

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:14)

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