Tag Archives: truth

Fifth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 9A

Track 1: The Path of Life

Genesis 24:34-38, 42-49, 58-67
Psalm 45: 11-18
or Song of Solomon 2:8-13
Romans 7:15-25a
Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30

Abraham sent his head servant back to his home country and to his relatives in order to obtain a wife for his son Isaac. He did not want his son to marry a daughter of the Canaanites. When his servant questioned Abraham about the matter, Abraham assured him that the angel of God would go before him to intervene on his behalf.

The servant obeyed Abraham. What he reached his destination, he was wise to pray to the Lord first. Then he preceded. In today’s Old Testament, Abraham’s servant recounts his experience of how God responded to his prayer.

“I came today to the spring, and said, ‘O Lord, the God of my master Abraham, if now you will only make successful the way I am going! I am standing here by the spring of water; let the young woman who comes out to draw, to whom I shall say, “Please give me a little water from your jar to drink,” and who will say to me, “Drink, and I will draw for your camels also”—let her be the woman whom the Lord has appointed for my master’s son.’   

“Before I had finished speaking in my heart, there was Rebekah coming out with her water jar on her shoulder; and she went down to the spring, and drew. I said to her, ‘Please let me drink.’ She quickly let down her jar from her shoulder, and said, ‘Drink, and I will also water your camels.’ So I drank, and she also watered the camels.   (Genesis 24:42-46)

We know the story well. Rebekah eventually became Isaac’s wife. But that was Abraham. He had made a covenant with God. He was to become the father of many nations. Is God that involved with our lives? Yes, if we allow him. We, too, have a covenant with God.

In Proverbs we read:

Trust in the Lord with all your heart,
And lean not on your own understanding;
In all your ways acknowledge Him,
And He shall direct your paths.   (Proverbs 3:5-6)

God has a plan for each of our lives. Following his plan, though there may be hardships, will ultimately bring us great blessings. We may not grow financially wealthy as some preachers are promising today. True wealth is a relationship with God in Christ Jesus. Jesus promised:

“Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”   (Matthew 11:28-30)

Entering into God’s rest is a path which we may choose to take, or not to take. Jesus is that path. He said:

Jesus said to him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.   (John 14:6)

God is concerned about every aspect of our lives. Jesus said: “All the hair on our heads are numbered.” A daily walk with God is the answer to today’s turmoil and stress. As we walk with him we will not miss the opportunities and blessings he is sending our way. When we exclude God from our decisions and try to follow our own path, we greatly limit what God can do for us and through us. In Proverbs we read:

There is a way that seems right to a man,
But its end is the way of death.   (Proverbs 16:25)

The psalmist wrote about a different and a different outcome:

You will show me the path of life;
In Your presence is fullness of joy;
At Your right hand are pleasures forevermore.

That is our path if we choose it.

 

 

Track 2: Struggling with Sin

Zechariah 9:9-12
Psalm 145:8-15
Romans 7:15-25a
Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30

Have we ever made New Year’s resolutions and found them difficult to keep? How about Lenten disciplines? We may not be alone. The Apostle Paul shared this with the Church in Rome:

I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. Now if I do what I do not want, I agree that the law is good. But in fact it is no longer I that do it, but sin that dwells within me. For I know that nothing good dwells within me, that is, in my flesh. I can will what is right, but I cannot do it. For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do. Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I that do it, but sin that dwells within me.   (Romans 7:15-20)

Perhaps the great apostle and missionary to the Gentiles, who wrote a large part of the New Testament was just writing about himself before his Christian conversion? No. This is what he was saying about himself before his conversion:

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.   (Philippians 3:4-6)

In his mind, his religion had helped establish his righteous. It was a false sense of righteousness that Paul would ultimately declare it was like a filthy rag. The holiness of God, when experienced in the presence of the Holy Spirit, will always convict us. This is a good thing. Paul’s dilemma over sin in his life was not going to be solved by any religion.

Having written concerning the futility of overcoming sinful acts on his own, Paul makes this declaration:

Wretched man that I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Paul’s struggling with sin stopped when he turned his struggle over to the Lord Jesus. Jesus said:

“Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”   (Matthew 11:25-30)

We must first enter the rest Jesus has provided for us before he can continue to do his work of sanctification or cleansing in us. When we do, then he will teach us his ways. He will impart his ways in us. He will not browbeat us. His is gentle and humble in heart. We learn and grow much better when we are not under a burden of guilt.

There is no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. We will experience conviction, however. This conviction is a good thing. It should not hide from it. The Apostle John tells us how to deal with it:

If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.   (1 John 1:8-9)

Jesus is ready to rescue us from our body of death. Are we ready for him to perform his skilled surgical work? Now is the time to come to him with all our hearts, putting our full trust and confidence in him. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly he will renew us day by day. Amen.

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Sixth Sunday of Easter, Year A

262017884xGMKlo_phThe Spirit of Truth

We live in a pluralist society. It is becoming ever more difficult to talk about our Christian faith. Persecutions of Christians are on the rise, even in America. Moreover, there are alternative messages to the Gospel that spew out on the airways and over the internet. False doctrines have supplanted Biblical truths. Deception, misinformation, disinformation, and down right lies are the order of the day. Some might even say psyops, brainwashing, and group think. Satan has taken over the culture of today.

We are living in a very dark time indeed. Who is telling the truth? What is truth? People are begging for the truth, rather they realize it or not. That is where Christian comes in. Are we prepared to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ?

The Apostle Peter laid down this challenge:

Always be ready to make your defense to anyone who demands from you an accounting for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and reverence.   (1 Peter 3:15-16)

God has done great things for us. Will we boldly share with others what he has done? The psalmist wrote:

Come and listen, all you who fear God,
and I will tell you what he has done for me.

I called out to him with my mouth,
and his praise was on my tongue.   (Psalm 66:14-15)

If we are to give witness to the Christian way of life, then we must be living the Christian way of life. We must be different from the world. This is no time for shallow or nominal Christians. We must be walking with Jesus on a daily basis. We cannot truly witness the Christian faith without his help. The good news is that he has promised to help us. We read in today’s Gospel:

Jesus said, ”If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever. This is the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, because he abides with you, and he will be in you.   (John 14:15-17)

Jesus has given us supernatural help by way of the Parakletos, which is a Greek word often translated as “helper.” The Holy Spirit is our helper and guide who leads us to the truth. He is the Spirit of Aletheia, in the Greek, which means standing against corrupt opinions and precepts of false teachers. The Holy Spirit is the Spirit of truth.

The Spirit of truth helps us to understand and interpret God’s Word and relate it to our lives. With the Spirit we are not in the dark. Without the Spirit we are part of the darkness.

Jesus promised:

I will not leave you orphaned; I am coming to you. In a little while the world will no longer see me, but you will see me; because I live, you also will live. On that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you. They who have my commandments and keep them are those who love me; and those who love me will be loved by my Father, and I will love them and reveal myself to them.”   (John 14:18-21)

Have we received the Spirit? He is continually available to us. But we must ask for him. We must ask for his help. And we must also seek to keep the commandments of God. Deliberate sin is not compatible with the Spirit because this type of living is not truthful. It does not show the world what God has done for us. To speak the truth we need the Spirit of truth and we need to live in truth daily.

We are living in critical times. God is bringing the Church age to the close. Are we ready for that day when God judges the earth? How about our families and loved ones? The Apostle Paul wrote:

While God has overlooked the times of human ignorance, now he commands all people everywhere to repent, because he has fixed a day on which he will have the world judged in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed, and of this he has given assurance to all by raising him from the dead.”   (Acts 17:30-31)

Jesus has risen from the dead and sits on the right hand of God the Father. He is calling us to live out our faith that the world may know that we have risen with him. We are not longer subject to this world and its compromised. We must live in the truth by the Spirit of truth to demonstrate to the world what is real and lasting. This present age is passing away. Even unbelievers sense it. Where can they go for answers? We who are living in Christ are the answer for them. Jesus is Lord of this age and in the age to come. Amen.

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Monday in Easter Week

Selected Truth

As we know, unlike the men, the women were quick to believe in the resurrection. The Jewish leaders realized the danger of such belief and they took extraordinary steps to prevent this from happening:

Suddenly Jesus met Mary Magdalene and the other Mary and said, “Greetings!” And they came to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”

While they were going, some of the guard went into the city and told the chief priests everything that had happened. After the priests had assembled with the elders, they devised a plan to give a large sum of money to the soldiers, telling them, “You must say, `His disciples came by night and stole him away while we were asleep.’ If this comes to the governor’s ears, we will satisfy him and keep you out of trouble.” So they took the money and did as they were directed. And this story is still told among the Jews to this day.  (Matthew 28:9-15)

The tomb was empty. That was a fact. What was needed was a plausible explanation that the people might believe. Does this sound like today’s political games? Why must so much effort be made to obscure the truth? Because the truth is dangerous.

Peter was not known for political correctness:

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed the multitude, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. You that are Israelites, listen to what I have to say: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with deeds of power, wonders, and signs that God did through him among you, as you yourselves know– this man, handed over to you according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of those outside the law. But God raised him up, having freed him from death, because it was impossible for him to be held in its power.  (Acts 2:14,22-25)

Where is the bold leadership that we need as a people today? As people of God let us be filled with the Spirit and set free from the fear of worldly people. Let us proclaim the truth of the Gospel with boldness. Jesus is risen from the dead. Truth is on the side of Christians. Only God’s word is true. Lies are a sign of unbelief and the falsehood of this world is quickly passing away.

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