Tag Archives: trust

Fifth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 7B

Track 1: Now Is the Acceptable Time

1 Samuel 17: (1a, 4-11, 19-23), 32-49
Psalm 9:9-20
or
1 Samuel 17:57-18:5, 10-16
Psalm 133

2 Corinthians 6:1-13
Mark 4:35-41

In life we can face great obstacles, tests, and trials. David was facing a great challenge which might seem beyond him or any Israeli: The giant Goliath. Goliath was a massive Philistine soldier. He was prepared to fight anyone from Israel who was willing to face him. The victor would determine the fate of the two nations. From 1 Samuel we read:

David said to Saul, “Let no one’s heart fail because of him; your servant will go and fight with this Philistine.” Saul said to David, “You are not able to go against this Philistine to fight with him; for you are just a boy, and he has been a warrior from his youth.” But David said to Saul, “Your servant used to keep sheep for his father; and whenever a lion or a bear came, and took a lamb from the flock, I went after it and struck it down, rescuing the lamb from its mouth; and if it turned against me, I would catch it by the jaw, strike it down, and kill it. Your servant has killed both lions and bears; and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, since he has defied the armies of the living God.” David said, “The Lord, who saved me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear, will save me from the hand of this Philistine.” So Saul said to David, “Go, and may the Lord be with you!”   (1 Samuel 17:32-37)

For David, preparation was the key. He had faced dangerous situation in the past and he knew that he could call on God for help. God would answer him and come to his aid as he had done so many times before. David was prepared for an immediate response to Goliath. He was ready because he knew that God was with him and that God was ready.

Are we ready to face our Goliath’s? We cannot and should not do it alone. God must be with us. Do we have the confidence that David had that God is on our side and we are on his side?

Maybe we have not been faithful in our walk with God. Maybe we have not cultivated a personal relationship with God that David had done. We might think: If only we had done so, then we would have been prepared for the crisis. The good news of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is that, though we may not be ready, God is still ready. The Apostle Paul wrote:

As we work together with Christ, we urge you also not to accept the grace of God in vain. For he says,

“At an acceptable time I have listened to you,
and on a day of salvation I have helped you.”

See, now is the acceptable time; see, now is the day of salvation!   (2 Corinthians 6:1-2)

God is an immediate God. He is ready to act now. Are we ready? Are we ready to abandon in notion that we might that we can navigate our lives without him? The disciples of Jesus had to learn this lesson. In Mark’s Gospel we read:

A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But Jesus was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. 40 He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?”   (Mark 4:37-39)

Jesus was in the boat with his disciples. Is he in our boat? If he is not then we should invite him in – right now. Now is the acceptable time!

 

 

Track 2: Peace! Be Still!

Job 38:1-11
Psalm 107:1-3, 23-32
2 Corinthians 6:1-13
Mark 4:35-41

In today’s gospel reading the disciples of Jesus were facing a dangerous windstorm. The boat they were end was in danger of capsizing. Form Mark’s Gospel we read:

When evening had come, Jesus said to his disciples, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”  (Mark 4:35-41)

The disciples of Jesus were seasoned fishermen. They were aware of the destructive nature of the storm they were facing. What makes such storms of nature scary? They can get out of hand. We are not able to control such storms. We need a safe escape plan. Will there be enough warning and time to escape?

There are other kinds of storms in life. Everything seems to be falling apart at times. Job was facing such a storm. He knew that only God could help him. But would God help him? Would God still be able to make a difference at such an advanced stage of the crisis he was facing. He was at his wit’s end, so to speak. Job had run out of piously correct prayers. He cried out to God in desperation.

Job was not prepared for God’s answer:

The Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind:

“Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge?

Gird up your loins like a man,
I will question you, and you shall declare to me.

“Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?
Tell me, if you have understanding.   (Job 38:1-4)

In a similar state, the disciples of Jesus were facing a grave crisis. They were aso not prepared for Jesus’ answer: “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?”

What might be missing in both of these storms? God is in charge of everything, including storms. God the Father laid the foundation of the earth. He is the creator of the entire universe. God the Son was the very agent of creation. In John’s Gospel we read:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being.   (John 1:1-3)

Jesus could rebuke the wind because Jesus formed the wind. God was in control of the world because he created the world. This meant that God was also in control of the circumstances in which Job found himself. Is God in control of our circumstance? Or do we find ourselves in a storm which we believe may be out of control?

Jesus was in the boat with his disciples. They were not alone. He spoke to the storm: “Peace! Be still!” Is Jesus in our boat? He is if we call upon him. The psalmist wrote:

The Lord is a stronghold for the oppressed,
a stronghold in times of trouble.
And those who know your name put their trust in you,
for you, O Lord, have not forsaken those who seek you.   (Psalm 9:9-10)

And again:

The Lord is your keeper;
    the Lord is your shade at your right hand.
The sun shall not strike you by day,
    nor the moon by night.

The Lord will keep you from all evil;
    he will keep your life.
The Lord will keep
    your going out and your coming in
    from this time on and forevermore.   (Psalm 121:5-8)

In our lifetime our faith will be tested. But we have this assurance from our Lord:

I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution. But take courage; I have conquered the world!”   (John 16:33)

He will never leave us or forsake us. Let us never abandon our hope in him.

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Saint Barnabas

Son of Encouragement

Today we celebrate Saint Barnabas, the traveling companion of the Apostle Paul. He was more than a traveling companion. Barnabas was largely responsible for encouraging Paul to undertake an active ministry.

We know about Paul’s conversion on the road to Damascus. We know that Jesus Himself called Paul into ministry. Nonetheless, Paul was not easily accepted as an apostle of Jesus by the leadership in Jerusalem. He had been persecuting the Church. Barnabas, however, looked at Paul through the eyes of Christ. He rescued Paul and presented him to the apostles, testifying that Paul was indeed a true believer. This was typical of Barnabas. His name meant “son of encouragement.”

Barnabas was chosen along with Paul for a special mission:

Now in the church at Antioch there were prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon who was called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen a member of the court of Herod the ruler, and Saul. While they were worshiping the Lord and fasting, the Holy Spirit said, “Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.” Then after fasting and praying they laid their hands on them and sent them off.   (Acts 13:1-3)

This was the beginning of the great mission to the Gentiles. Barnabas and Paul were willing to travel without special requirements or treatment. They endured great hardships for the Gospel. They were willing to follow the instructions which Jesus gave His disciples concerning the conduct of ministry:

Jesus said to the twelve, “As you go, proclaim the good news, `The kingdom of heaven has come near.’ Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out demons. You received without payment; give without payment. Take no gold, or silver, or copper in your belts, no bag for your journey, or two tunics, or sandals, or a staff; for laborers deserve their food.   (Matthew 10:7-10)

What can we learn from Barnabas about our own ministry? He did not care what others thought about Paul. He listened only to what God was telling him. He wanted the praises and approval of God more than that of human beings.

A positive attitude is helpful. Prayer and fasting is preparation. The support of a community is vital and of absolute necessity. A willingness to be set apart by the Holy Spirit for ministry directed by God and not by our own desires. Perhaps this last one is most difficult. The Holy Spirit may lead us into difficult places where we must rely solely on God.

We may not be asked by God to leave home and job. We may, however, be asked to give up some of our cherished beliefs about ministry. We may be asked to leave our comfort zones. We may be required to work with others who are not on the approved list. We might just be called to offer encouragement and support to others in their ministry. God is still calling his Barnabas’s.

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Third Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 5B

Track 1: The Sovereignty of God Rejected

1 Samuel 8:4-11, (12-15), 16-20, (11:14-15)
Psalm 138
2 Corinthians 4:13-5:1
Mark 3:20-35

Israel was an exceptional nation for one reason only. Though were chosen by an exceptional God. God has lead them out of slavery in Egypt with signs and wonders and brought them into a land promised to their forefather Abraham. With God’s help they defeated the pagan nations in this land. Nevertheless, despite all of this the people wanted to be like other nations. They wanted to have a king. From 1 Samuel we read:

All the elders of Israel gathered together and came to Samuel at Ramah, and said to him, “You are old and your sons do not follow in your ways; appoint for us, then, a king to govern us, like other nations.” But the thing displeased Samuel when they said, “Give us a king to govern us.” Samuel prayed to the Lord, and the Lord said to Samuel, “Listen to the voice of the people in all that they say to you; for they have not rejected you, but they have rejected me from being king over them. Just as they have done to me, from the day I brought them up out of Egypt to this day, forsaking me and serving other gods, so also they are doing to you. Now then, listen to their voice; only—you shall solemnly warn them, and show them the ways of the king who shall reign over them.   (1 Samuel 8:4-9)

God was to king over Israel. God’s people were to be a holy nation – a kingdom of priests. They were not merely asking for a king to be like other nations. They were rejecting the plans and purposes of God. Reading on:

But the people refused to listen to the voice of Samuel; they said, “No! but we are determined to have a king over us, so that we also may be like other nations, and that our king may govern us and go out before us and fight our battles.”  (1 Samuel 8:19-20)

There is much talk today about America being an exceptional nation. God makes covenants with people and with nations. When we obey him and keep his commandments he gives us an exceptional task. Any nation favored by God is a holy nation, a missionary nation. The nation is not exceptional. Rather, they are serving an exceptional God.

In 1897, Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee was held in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of her reign. The poet Rudyard Kipling was asked to write something to help celebrate the event. He wrote his famous poem “Recessional” which reads in part:

The tumult and the shouting dies;
   The Captains and the Kings depart:
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
   An humble and a contrite heart.
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget—lest we forget!

This warning by Kipling is still applicable today, for all nations. Armies rise and fall. Kingdoms come and go. God warns through the Prophet Isaiah:

Have you not known? Have you not heard?
    Has it not been told you from the beginning?
    Have you not understood from the foundations of the earth?
It is he who sits above the circle of the earth,
    and its inhabitants are like grasshoppers;
who stretches out the heavens like a curtain,
    and spreads them like a tent to live in;
who brings princes to naught,
    and makes the rulers of the earth as nothing.

Scarcely are they planted, scarcely sown,
    scarcely has their stem taken root in the earth,
when he blows upon them, and they wither,
    and the tempest carries them off like stubble.   (Isaiah 40:21-24)

Through that same prophet he gives his assurances to those who follow in his ways:

Have you not known? Have you not heard?
The Lord is the everlasting God,
    the Creator of the ends of the earth.
He does not faint or grow weary;
    his understanding is unsearchable.
He gives power to the faint,
    and strengthens the powerless.
Even youths will faint and be weary,
    and the young will fall exhausted;
but those who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength,
    they shall mount up with wings like eagles,
they shall run and not be weary,
    they shall walk and not faint.   (Isaiah 40:28-31)

The prophet, psalmist, King David wrote:

May our sons in their youth
    be like plants full grown,
our daughters like corner pillars,
    cut for the building of a palace.
1May our barns be filled,
    with produce of every kind;
may our sheep increase by thousands,
    by tens of thousands in our fields,
     and may our cattle be heavy with young.
May there be no breach in the walls, no exile,
    and no cry of distress in our streets.

Happy are the people to whom such blessings fall;
    happy are the people whose God is the Lord.   (Psalm 144:12-15)

The only exceptional nation is the one which is serving an exceptional God. Have we forgotten, America?

 

 

Track 2: Satan’s Illusion

Genesis 3:8-15
Psalm 130
2 Corinthians 4:13-5:1
Mark 3:20-35

Intimacy with God the Father was established for humankind in the beginning. A fallen angel imparted the notion that we do not need an intimacy with God because there was a reality separate from God which greatly expands our possibilities and experience. From Genesis we read:

They heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden at the time of the evening breeze, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the garden. But the Lord God called to the man, and said to him, “Where are you?” He said, “I heard the sound of you in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.” He said, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten from the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?” The man said, “The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me fruit from the tree, and I ate.” Then the Lord God said to the woman, “What is this that you have done?” The woman said, “The serpent tricked me, and I ate.”   (Genesis 3:8-14)

Satan had Adam and Eve buy into a false reality by telling them what they were experiencing had been just an illusion. His trick was and is still the same game: Satan’s substitutes his illusion for God’s reality and then calls God’s reality an illusion.

Today we live in an illusion. This was also true when Jesus ministered upon the earth. We read in Mark’s Gospel:

The crowd came together again, so that Jesus and his disciples could not even eat. When his family heard it, they went out to restrain him, for people were saying, “He has gone out of his mind.” And the scribes who came down from Jerusalem said, “He has Beelzebul, and by the ruler of the demons he casts out demons.” And he called them to him, and spoke to them in parables, “How can Satan cast out Satan? If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. And if a house is divided against itself, that house will not be able to stand. And if Satan has risen up against himself and is divided, he cannot stand, but his end has come. But no one can enter a strong man’s house and plunder his property without first tying up the strong man; then indeed the house can be plundered.   (Mark 3:20-27)

Jesus was casting out demons and setting people free from a false reality. His family, however, were worried that his actions were not fitting into the accepted norms. They wanted to restrain Jesus because his reality was different from theirs. Notice that the scribes were saying that what Jesus was doing was demonic when Jesus was actually destroying the works of the demonic. In a world of illusions the actually reality of God’s world does not seem to fit in. Satan’s method is to discredit God’s reality by discrediting his word.

Are we ready to come out from under the burdens of a false narrative and live truly free? As recorded in the Gospel of Mark his family was not quite ready:

Then his mother and his brothers came; and standing outside, they sent to him and called him. A crowd was sitting around him; and they said to him, “Your mother and your brothers and sisters are outside, asking for you.” And he replied, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” And looking at those who sat around him, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! Whoever does the will of God is my brother and sister and mother.”  (Mark 3:31-35)

Family can be a huge obstacle in living as a disciple of Christ. Jesus said that the family of believers transcends any boundaries which family may place upon us.

We live in a fallen world. That is the reality. It is not normal. It is abnormal and against the purposes of God. Yet the world exerts pressures upon us to conform to its way of thinking. We cannot allow ourselves to be dragged down into the same ditch in which the world lives. The Apostle Paul wrote:

So we do not lose heart. Even though our outer nature is wasting away, our inner nature is being renewed day by day. For this slight momentary affliction is preparing us for an eternal weight of glory beyond all measure, because we look not at what can be seen but at what cannot be seen; for what can be seen is temporary, but what cannot be seen is eternal.

For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.   (2 Corinthians 4:16-5:1)

Satan’s illusion is passing away. Only the reality of God will remain. Now is the time to embrace the truth of God’s reality and word. From the Prophet Isaiah:

Have you not known? Have you not heard?
The Lord is the everlasting God,
    the Creator of the ends of the earth.
He does not faint or grow weary;
    his understanding is unsearchable.
He gives power to the faint,
    and strengthens the powerless.
Even youths will faint and be weary,
    and the young will fall exhausted;
but those who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength,
    they shall mount up with wings like eagles,
they shall run and not be weary,
    they shall walk and not faint.   (Isaiah 40:28-31)

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