Tag Archives: the cross

Last Sunday after Pentecost: Christ the Kingi

The Lord Is Our Righteousness

Jeremiah 23:1-6
Luke 1:68-79 or Psalm 46
Colossians 1:11-20
Luke 23:33-43

Today we celebrate Jesus as Christ the King. The psalmist wrote about kingship:

Why do the nations conspire,
    and the peoples plot in vain?
The kings of the earth set themselves,
    and the rulers take counsel together,
    against the Lord and his anointed, saying,
“Let us burst their bonds asunder,
    and cast their cords from us.”

He who sits in the heavens laughs;
the Lord has them in derision.
Then he will speak to them in his wrath,
and terrify them in his fury, saying,
“I have set my king on Zion, my holy hill.”   (Psalm 2:1-6)

The Children of Israel wanted a king like other nations and God reluctantly gave them one. Their first king Saul wasted little time before attempting to rule by his own authority rather than under God’s authority.

John Dalberg-Acton was a member of the British House of Commons. He took a great interest in the United States, considering its federal structure the perfect guarantor of individual liberties. He famously wrote:

“Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.”

Even today, we have no shortages of people who want to rule nations, or even the world. God has other plans. He had prepared for these eventualities in advance. In today’s Old Testament reading, God spoke through the Prophet Jeremiah:

The days are surely coming, says the Lord, when I will raise up for David a righteous Branch, and he shall reign as king and deal wisely, and shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In his days Judah will be saved and Israel will live in safety. And this is the name by which he will be called: “The Lord is our righteousness.”   (Jeremiah 23:5-6)

God would raise up his chosen king for Israel, and not only for Israel, but for the entire world. Who is this king and what were his origins? The Apostle Paul wrote:

He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created, things visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or powers– all things have been created through him and for him. He himself is before all things, and in him all things hold together. He is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that he might come to have first place in everything. For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him God was pleased to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, by making peace through the blood of his cross.   (Colossians 1:15-20)

How do we relate to such a king? This king is the Second Person of the Godhead. He is the agent of creation. He was with God the Father from the beginning of the earth. Do we fully grasp who he is and understand his mission?

In today’s Gospel reading there is a discussion concerning Jesus as king of the Jews:

The people stood by, watching Jesus on the cross; but the leaders scoffed at him, saying, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Messiah of God, his chosen one!” The soldiers also mocked him, coming up and offering him sour wine, and saying, “If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself!” There was also an inscription over him, “This is the King of the Jews.”   (Luke 23:35-38)

How do we relate to a king who is very God of very God, yet is giving up himself to a cruel cross? This is not like any other kingship that we know of.

There were two criminals hanging on crosses to either side pf Jesus:

One of the criminals who were hanged there kept deriding him and saying, “Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us!” But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed have been condemned justly, for we are getting what we deserve for our deeds, but this man has done nothing wrong.” Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” He replied, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”   (Luke 23:39-43)

How did the one thief on the cross relate to Jesus? He did not say the sinners prayer. He was not a member of a church. He was not even baptized. But Jesus read his heart.

The mystery of the cross is more about how Jesus related to this criminal than the other way around. Jesus identified with this criminal. He identifies with all of us. He came to give himself to us as a ransom for many.

Jesus is called the King if kings and Lord of lords. But he has another name as well. From the Book of Jeremiah:

And this is the name by which he will be called: “The Lord is our righteousness.”   (Jeremiah 23:6)

Satan will do everything in his power to stop the kingship of Jesus. In fact, in the last days he will bring his own king on the scene. This king will serve under the authority of the beast, that is to say Satan himself. Many people will bow down to this king, even professing Christians. We are rapidly heading in that direction. In Revelation we read:

These are united in yielding their power and authority to the beast; they will make war on the Lamb, and the Lamb will conquer them, for he is Lord of lords and King of kings, and those with him are called and chosen and faithful.”   (Revelation 17:13-14)

We need to hold on to the king who relates to us. We need to embrace the king who died for us to save our souls, and rose again from the dead that we, too, may be raised up to newness of life. The Apostle Paul wrote:

May you be made strong with all the strength that comes from his glorious power, and may you be prepared to endure everything with patience, while joyfully giving thanks to the Father, who has enabled you to share in the inheritance of the saints in the light. He has rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of his beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.   (Colossians 1:11-14)

Jesus kingship is not of this present world. His kingship is for the world to come. Do we serve him as our king. He serves us always. He has come to move us out of darkness into his most glorious light.

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Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 27C

Track 1: The Greater Temple

Haggai 1:15b-2:9
Psalm 145:1-5, 18-22
or Psalm 98
2 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17
Luke 20:27-38

In today’s Old Testament lesson, God speaks to the leadership who have returned from captivity in Babylon:

In the second year of King Darius, in the seventh month, on the twenty-first day of the month, the word of the Lord came by the prophet Haggai, saying: Speak now to Zerubbabel son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, and to Joshua son of Jehozadak, the high priest, and to the remnant of the people, and say, Who is left among you that saw this house in its former glory? How does it look to you now? Is it not in your sight as nothing?   (Haggai 1:15-2:9)

Solomon’s Temple was magnificent. But it was destroyed when the Jews were carried away to Babylon. Now the Jews were faced with a daunting task of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem. God encourages them:

Yet now take courage, O Zerubbabel, says the Lord; take courage, O Joshua, son of Jehozadak, the high priest; take courage, all you people of the land, says the Lord; work, for I am with you, says the Lord of hosts, according to the promise that I made you when you came out of Egypt. My spirit abides among you; do not fear. For thus says the Lord of hosts: Once again, in a little while, I will shake the heavens and the earth and the sea and the dry land; and I will shake all the nations, so that the treasure of all nations shall come, and I will fill this house with splendor, says the Lord of hosts. The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, says the Lord of hosts. The latter splendor of this house shall be greater than the former, says the Lord of hosts; and in this place I will give prosperity, says the Lord of hosts.   (Haggai 1:15-2:9)

What Temple is God talking about? Is it the second Temple that stood during the earthly ministry of Jesus? Most likely not. That Temple would not last. Reading from the Gospel of John:

The Jews then said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” The Jews then said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?” But he was speaking of the temple of his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.   (John 2:18-22)

The Temple Jesus was speaking about was himself. He would become the Temple of God after his resurrection. Believers would have direct access to God trough him alone. Reading from Mark’s Gospel:

And Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost. And the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom. And when the centurion, which stood over against him, saw that he so cried out, and gave up the ghost, he said, Truly this man was the Son of God.   (Mark 15:37-39)

John had a revelation of the Holy City and the Temple of God:

I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it. Its gates will never be shut by day—and there will be no night there. People will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations. But nothing unclean will enter it, nor anyone who practices abomination or falsehood, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s book of life.   (Revelation 21:22-27)

This is the Temple which will surpass the splendor of Solomon’s Temple. As believers in Christ, we are destined to become a part of this Temple. The Apostel Paul wrote to the Church of Thessaloniki:

But we must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the first fruits for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and through belief in the truth. For this purpose he called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. So then, brothers and sisters, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by our letter.   (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15)

We are called by God to obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. We are now in preparation for that glory. Paul wrote:

I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory about to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the children of God;   (Romans 8:18-19)

From the Book of Job:

For I know that my Redeemer lives,
and that at the last he will stand upon the earth;

and after my skin has been thus destroyed,
then in my flesh I shall see God,

whom I shall see on my side,   (Job 19:25-27)

Job longed for the day when he will share the glory of God. Where do we stand today? Is that our goal, or have we been sidetracked by the fleeting riches of this day? Just as the Temple in Jerusalem was cast down in the 70th year of our Lord, so will be the things of this world.

Is God on our side? Are we on the side of God? Jesus is the greater Temple and we are a part of that Temple. Let us aspire to that high calling and not look back, neither to the right or left.

 

 

Track 2: The Resurrection of the Body

Job 19:23-27a
Psalm 17:1-9
2 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17
Luke 20:27-38

It was a question that wan on Job’s mind:

If mortals die, will they live again?
    All the days of my service I would wait
    until my release should come.
You would call, and I would answer you;
    you would long for the work of your hands.  (Job 14:13-15)

It is a question on many minds. The Sadducees had already settled the question. For them there was no resurrection. In today’s Gospel reading they tested Jesus on the matter:

Some Sadducees, those who say there is no resurrection, came to Jesus and asked him a question, “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man’s brother dies, leaving a wife but no children, the man shall marry the widow and raise up children for his brother. Now there were seven brothers; the first married, and died childless; then the second and the third married her, and so in the same way all seven died childless. Finally the woman also died. In the resurrection, therefore, whose wife will the woman be? For the seven had married her.”   (Luke 20:27-33)

They asked this absurd question because they thought the resurrection was absurd. Jesus answered them:

“Those who belong to this age marry and are given in marriage; but those who are considered worthy of a place in that age and in the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in marriage. Indeed they cannot die anymore, because they are like angels and are children of God, being children of the resurrection. And the fact that the dead are raised Moses himself showed, in the story about the bush, where he speaks of the Lord as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Now he is God not of the dead, but of the living; for to him all of them are alive.”   (Luke 20:34-38)

God is the God of the living. Is God our God? Through much suffering Job came to this conclusion:

“O that my words were written down!
O that they were inscribed in a book!

O that with an iron pen and with lead
they were engraved on a rock forever!

For I know that my Redeemer lives,
and that at the last he will stand upon the earth;

and after my skin has been thus destroyed,
then in my flesh I shall see God,

whom I shall see on my side,
and my eyes shall behold, and not another.”   (Job 19:23-27)

Job came to the realization that the God of the living was his God. God has ordained us for eternal life, not eternal death. Death is a temporary thing. It has been caused by sin. The good news of the Gospel is that Jesus has overcome sin and the grave. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.

For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his. We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin. For whoever has died is freed from sin. But if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.   (Romans 6:3-11)

In today’s Epistle reading Paul writes about eternal salvation in Jesus Christ:

But we must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the first fruits for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and through belief in the truth. For this purpose he called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. So then, brothers and sisters, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by our letter.   (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15)

Paul mentions two essential ingredients that should not be overlooked. If we are to obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus then we need the sanctification by the Spirit as well a belief in the truth of the resurrection. The resurrection has been prepared for us through the cross of Christ. We must take possession of it. If we desire to be raised up like Jesus, then we the work of Holy Spirit in our lives.

Is our God the God of the living? If so, then we will be living in the salvation of his Son.

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Holy Cross Day

Day of Judgment

The Prophet Isaiah forecast a time when God would hold a court to judge humankind for sin. God was speaking to the nation of Israel, but Israel was a proxy for all the nations of the world:

Declare and present your case;
let them take counsel together!

Who told this long ago?
Who declared it of old?

Was it not I, the Lord?
There is no other god besides me,

a righteous God and a Saviour;
there is no one besides me.   (Isaiah 45:21)

We are asked by God to present our case to him. God is also saying that he is qualified to judge our case because he is creator and has established all life. There is no other god besides him. Furthermore, his very nature and character qualifies him. He will be fair because he is not only a righteous God, but he is also our Savior.

A righteous God must be fair, but he must also be just. He must declare the injustice caused by sin. Sin cannot be ignored or swept under the rug. How is God able to accomplish this most difficult task, that of being both compassionate and just?

Before his verdict of guilty and penalty of death, God provided a path of escape. He did so through his Son Jesus Christ. The Apostle Paul reminds us of the cruel crucifixion of Jesus by his own choice and desire:

Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited,

but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
being born in human likeness.

And being found in human form,
he humbled himself
and became obedient to the point of death—
even death on a cross.

Therefore God also highly exalted him
and gave him the name
that is above every name,

so that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,

and every tongue should confess
that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.   (Philippians 2:5-11)

In today’s Gospel reading we see a link between the judgement of God and a route of escape:

Jesus said, “Now is the judgment of this world; now the ruler of this world will be driven out. And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” He said this to indicate the kind of death he was to die.   (John 12:31-33)

On the cross the sins of the whole world were judged. Jesus bore our sins for us while hanging from a cross and receiving the Father’s judgement.  The judgement of sin was once and for all, for all who believe. The Apostle Paul’ wrote:

“For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.”   (Romans 6:23)

Have we allowed God to judge our sins through his Son Jesus? If so, we must acknowledge it. We must turn towards Jesus. We must see him on the cross standing in for us.

God spoke through the Prophet Isaiah:

Turn to me and be saved,
all the ends of the earth!
For I am God, and there is no other.

By myself I have sworn,
from my mouth has gone forth in righteousness
a word that shall not return:

“To me every knee shall bow,
every tongue shall swear.”

Only in the Lord, it shall be said of me,
are righteousness and strength;

all who were incensed against him
shall come to him and be ashamed.

In the Lord all the offspring of Israel
shall triumph and glory.   (Isaiah 45:22-25)

Do we want triumph and glory? The only judgement of God that is left is the judgement of fallen angels. That judgement is not meant for us. Do we ignore such a great gift of salvation established on a Holy Cross? If Jesus humbled himself, why can we not humble ourselves? In Hebrews we read:

Therefore we must pay greater attention to what we have heard, so that we do not drift away from it. For if the message declared through angels was valid, and every transgression or disobedience received a just penalty, how can we escape if we neglect so great a salvation? It was declared at first through the Lord, and it was attested to us by those who heard him, while God added his testimony by signs and wonders and various miracles, and by gifts of the Holy Spirit, distributed according to his will..   (Hebrews 2:1-4)

It is the cross was very cruel instrument of torture and death. We say that it is holy only because it can make us holy. We have been washed in the blood of Jesus.  If we refuse what Christ has done for us we nullify the power of the cross and join ourselves with fallen angels who await the lake of fire.

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