Tag Archives: thanksgiving

Second Sunday after Christmas

 

Homily 1: A Spirit of Wisdom and Revelation

Today, more than ever, we need a spirit of wisdom and revelation in this world, even in the church. This has always been needed. It is a special privilege to know the glorious presence and power of Almighty God. The human mind, alone, cannot conceive or understand the riches of God. Paul wrote to the Church in Corinth::

But we speak God’s wisdom, secret and hidden, which God decreed before the ages for our glory. None of the rulers of this age understood this; for if they had, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory. But, as it is written,

“What no eye has seen, nor ear heard,
nor the human heart conceived,
what God has prepared for those who love him”—

these things God has revealed to us through the Spirit; for the Spirit searches everything, even the depths of God,   (1 Corinthians 2:7-10)

God has destined us to know him, to understand his character, to seek his presence in our lives, not just his favor. Satan does not want that to happen. He clouds our minds. He seeks to destroy any understanding of God. The last thing he wants is Immanuel, God with us. He wants us to believe that God is not with us and that he we never be with us. When King Herod learned of the Christ child he sought to kill. He did not really know who this new born was, but the demons who entered him did. From the Gospel of Matthew we read:

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet:

`And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;

for from you shall come a ruler
who is to shepherd my people Israel.'”   (Matthew 2:1-6)

We understand why Herod was inquiring about the birthplace of Jesus. He wanted to kill the child because was a threat to him. He was not only a threat to him, but to the whole world order, even the order of our day. Evil does not seek out the wisdom of God. Rather, evil does its best to cover up that wisdom.

The wise men from the East were seeking wisdom. They were not Jews, but they had read some of the prophets. They desired to know wisdom. They desired to know God. God led them to seek his wisdom. God led them to seek Jesus. Jesus is God’s wisdom. From John’s Gospel:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

Are we living in darkness or are seeking the light of God? Are we seeking the wisdom of God? Are we seeking to know God? God has come in the flesh. But to fully know him we still need to diligently seek what this means:

But without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him.   (Hebrews 11:6)i

We must approach God with faith. And we must seek him above everything else:

When you search for me, you will find me; if you seek me with all your heart,   (Jeremiah 29:13)

The Apostle Paul prayed for the Church in Ephesus:

I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe.   (Ephesians 1:17-18)

Let us take the time and energy to seek God as did the wise men. The travelled a great distance to do so. Are we willing and prepared to go the distance in our day?

 

Homily 2: How Dear to Me Is Your Dwelling

The  psalmist wrote:

How dear to me is your dwelling, O Lord of hosts!
My soul has a desire and longing for the courts of the Lord;
my heart and my flesh rejoice in the living God.

The sparrow has found her a house
and the swallow a nest where she may lay her young;
by the side of your altars, O Lord of hosts,
my King and my God.

Happy are they who dwell in your house!
they will always be praising you.   (Psalm 84:1-3)

It should not have been surprising that the young boy Jesus would seek out the House of God the Father. The Temple in Jerusalem was that place for the Jewish people. It was a place of pilgrimage, the high altar of God, where people received atonement for their sins. From Luke we read:

Now every year his parents went to Jerusalem for the festival of the Passover. And when he was twelve years old, they went up as usual for the festival. When the festival was ended and they started to return, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but his parents did not know it. Assuming that he was in the group of travelers, they went a day’s journey. Then they started to look for him among their relatives and friends. When they did not find him, they returned to Jerusalem to search for him. After three days they found him in the temple, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. And all who heard him were amazed at his understanding and his answers. When his parents saw him they were astonished; and his mother said to him, “Child, why have you treated us like this? Look, your father and I have been searching for you in great anxiety.” He said to them, “Why were you searching for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?”  (Luke 2:41-49)

Mary, the mother of Jesus would later understand. For the moment, both parents were surprised and confused:

But they did not understand what he said to them. Then he went down with them and came to Nazareth, and was obedient to them. His mother treasured all these things in her heart.   (Luke 2:50-51)

The Temple in Jerusalem was the House of God. That was ordained and established by God. But that was about to change. At the end of his earthly ministry, Jesus spoke there words:

“Destroy this temple, and I will raise it again in three days.”

They replied, “It has taken forty-six years to build this temple, and you are going to raise it in three days?” But the temple he had spoken of was his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples recalled what he had said. Then they believed the scripture and the words that Jesus had spoken.   (John 2:19-22)

After the the resurrection of of Jesus a transference occurred. Jesus was now the Temple of God. This was khown at the moment of Jesus’ death on the cross:

Then Jesus cried again with a loud voice and breathed his last. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. The earth shook, and the rocks were split. The tombs also were opened, and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised.   (Matthew 27:50-52)

Jesus is the House of God now. How desirous are we to enter the House of God” Again, the psalmist wrote:

For one day in your courts is better than a thousand in my own room,
and to stand at the threshold of the house of my God
than to dwell in the tents of the wicked.

For the Lord God is both sun and shield;
he will give grace and glory;

No good thing will the Lord withhold
from those who walk with integrity.

O Lord of hosts,
happy are they who put their trust in you!   (Psalm 84:9-12)

We live in very troubling times. Our only refuge is the Lord Jesus Christ. But there are keys to entering the House of God. Everyone one is invited, but not everyone is accepted. Scripture tells us:

Enter his gates with thanksgiving
    and his courts with praise;
    give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
    his faithfulness continues through all generations.   (100:4-5)

We are not good. Only God is good. We may only enter with a grateful heart. God is also looking for a contrite heart. Is that who we are?

For thus says the high and exalted One
Who lives forever, whose name is Holy,
“I dwell on a high and holy place,
And also with the contrite and lowly of spirit
In order to revive the spirit of the lowly
And to revive the heart of the contrite.   (Isaiah 57:15)

John, the revelator, heard in heaven:

And I heard a loud voice from the throne, saying, “Behold, the tabernacle of God is among men, and He will dwell among them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself will be among them,   (Revelation 21:3)

Jesus will soon be setting u his millennial kingdom on the earth. We must not wait. Now is the time that we should join ourselves to God. Reading from the Prophet Zechariah:

Sing and rejoice, O daughter Zion! For lo, I will come and dwell in your midst, says the LordMany nations shall join themselves to the Lord on that day, and shall be my people; and I will dwell in your midst. And you shall know that the Lord of hosts has sent me to you. The Lord will inherit Judah as his portion in the holy land, and will again choose Jerusalem.   (Zechariah 2:10-12)

Amen.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christmas, Eucharist, Gospel, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year B