Tag Archives: Temple

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 28C

Track 1: The Peaceable Kingdom

Isaiah 65:17-25
Canticle 9
2 Thessalonians 3:6-13
Luke 21:5-19

God has promised us blessings far beyond this world. We read in the Book of Isaiah:

For I am about to create new heavens
and a new earth;
the former things shall not be remembered
or come to mind.
But be glad and rejoice forever
in what I am creating;
for I am about to create Jerusalem as a joy,
and its people as a delight.   (Isaiah 65:17-18)

The new earth prophesied by Isaiah stands out in stark contrast to our current earth:

No more shall there be in it
an infant that lives but a few days,
or an old person who does not live out a lifetime;
for one who dies at a hundred years will be considered a youth,
and one who falls short of a hundred will be considered accursed.
They shall build houses and inhabit them;
they shall plant vineyards and eat their fruit.
They shall not build and another inhabit;
they shall not plant and another eat;
for like the days of a tree shall the days of my people be,
and my chosen shall long enjoy the work of their hands.
They shall not labor in vain,
or bear children for calamity;
for they shall be offspring blessed by the Lord —
and their descendants as well.   (Isaiah 65:20-23)

We know that our current life on earth falls far short of what we can imagine that it should be. There must be a better life coming. This longing opens a door to potential deception. Governments, politician, and even certain churches tells us that if we follow them, we will have a utopia on earth. Do we believe them?

The Apostle Paul writes that we should set aside this notion:

I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory about to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the children of God; for the creation was subjected to futility, not of its own will but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to decay and will obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. We know that the whole creation has been groaning in labor pains until now; and not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly while we wait for adoption, the redemption of our bodies.  (Romans 8:18-23)

We are under the bondage of decay because of our disobedience to God. Only God can set us free. His promise to us is that he will. Are we ready for his peaceful kingdom?

Isaiah prophesied:

The wolf and the lamb shall feed together,
the lion shall eat straw like the ox;
but the serpent—its food shall be dust!
They shall not hurt or destroy
on all my holy mountain,
says the Lord.   (Isaiah 65:25)

The Peaceful Kingdom or political utopia? One of these is a lie. If we are talking about this present age without the intervention of God, then we will see no peace. This does not stop people from promising peace if we do what they say. Though the false promises have never worked, it has not stopped politicians from making them.

It is not just the politicians who are making false promises. Many churches are preaching Dominion Theology – that is to say that Christians will have power and authority over all aspects of life. This supposedly will occur before the second coming of Jesus.

Jesus did not forecast this to happen. In fact, it is just the opposite. From the Gospel of Matthew:

“Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.

For I have come to set a man against his father,
and a daughter against her mother,
and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law;
and one’s foes will be members of one’s own household.”   (Matthew 10:34-36)

From today’s Gospel reading in Luke:

When some were speaking about the temple, how it was adorned with beautiful stones and gifts dedicated to God, Jesus said, “As for these things that you see, the days will come when not one stone will be left upon another; all will be thrown down.”

They asked him, “Teacher, when will this be, and what will be the sign that this is about to take place?” And he said, “Beware that you are not led astray; for many will come in my name and say, `I am he!’ and, `The time is near!’ Do not go after them.

“When you hear of wars and insurrections, do not be terrified; for these things must take place first, but the end will not follow immediately.” Then he said to them, “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and plagues; and there will be dreadful portents and great signs from heaven.   (Luke 21:5-11)

In the last age we will see these things take place. In fact, they are already taking place.

“But before all this occurs, they will arrest you and persecute you; they will hand you over to synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors because of my name. This will give you an opportunity to testify. So make up your minds not to prepare your defense in advance; for I will give you words and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to withstand or contradict. You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, by relatives and friends; and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your souls.”   (Luke 21:12-19)

The poem of William Alexander Percy, written in 1924, contains these lines:

The peace of God, it is no peace,
But strife closed in the sod,
Yet, brothers, pray for but one thing–
The marvelous peace of God.

This marvelous peace will only occur in the Millennial Reign of Christ. If we are to participate in this peace we must first participate in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. We will be betrayed. Are we prepared to be hated? Will we be silenced because of our so-called hate speech? Or will we endure to the end and gain our souls? We will endure, but only if we are embracing the Lord Jesus. He is embracing us if we let him. And he will see us through in this age. And in the age to come we will rule with him in his Peaceable Kingdom on earth.

 

 

Track 2: Not One Stone Will Be Left upon Another

Malachi 4:1-2a
Psalm 98
2 Thessalonians 3:6-13
Luke 21:5-19

The temple in Jerusalem was the hub of Jewish life. Everything in Judaism was centered around the temple. The temple was, for the Jewish people, the house of God. It represented God to the Jewish people. How devastating it must have been for the disciples of Jesus to hear about its coming destruction.

From today’s Gospel in Luke:

When some were speaking about the temple, how it was adorned with beautiful stones and gifts dedicated to God, Jesus said, “As for these things that you see, the days will come when not one stone will be left upon another; all will be thrown down.”   (Luke 21:5-6)

The thinking must have been that if we have the actual house of God in our midst then we must have God himself as well. The temple legitimized the Jewish people, their traditions and way of life.

We remember how God spoke through the Prophet Jeremiah:

Stand in the gate of the Lord’s house, and proclaim there this word, and say, Hear the word of the Lord, all you people of Judah, you that enter these gates to worship the Lord. Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Amend your ways and your doings, and let me dwell with you in this place. Do not trust in these deceptive words: “This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.”   (Jeremiah 7:1-4)

The temple of of the Lord did not legitimize anything. God was not married to the temple. He was not the God of a building. He was God of a chosen people. Before Jerusalem, Shiloh had represented God. God told Jeremiah:

Go now to my place that was in Shiloh, where I made my name dwell at first, and see what I did to it for the wickedness of my people Israel. And now, because you have done all these things, says the Lord, and when I spoke to you persistently, you did not listen, and when I called you, you did not answer, therefore I will do to the house that is called by my name, in which you trust, and to the place that I gave to you and to your ancestors, just what I did to Shiloh. And I will cast you out of my sight, just as I cast out all your kinsfolk, all the offspring of Ephraim.   (Jeremiah 7:11-15)

Did the Jews trust in only a buiding? Do we trust in a building? Do we trust in an institution? Institutions fail. Institutions can become corrupted. Can churches become corrupt?

If our hope is in an institution or in even a church, how secure are we? In today’s Old Testament reading we are warned that anything that works against the righteousness of God will ultimately be destroyed:

See, the day is coming, burning like an oven, when all the arrogant and all evildoers will be stubble; the day that comes shall burn them up, says the Lord of hosts, so that it will leave them neither root nor branch. But for you who revere my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings.   (Malachi 4:1-2a)

The Lord Jesus Christ himself is our savior. The psalmist wrote:

Sing to the Lord a new song,
for he has done marvelous things.

With his right hand and his holy arm
has he won for himself the victory.

The Lord has made known his victory;
his righteousness has he openly shown in the sight of the nations.   (Psalm 98:1-3)

Jesus has won the victory for us – not an institution, not even a church. He alone is our salvation for all who put their trust in him. He is our temple.

The Apostle John had a revelation of the Temple of God:

I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it. Its gates will never be shut by day — and there will be no night there. People will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations. But nothing unclean will enter it, nor anyone who practices abomination or falsehood, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s book of life.   (Revelation 21:22-27)

Amen.

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Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 27C

Track 1: The Greater Temple

Haggai 1:15b-2:9
Psalm 145:1-5, 18-22
or Psalm 98
2 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17
Luke 20:27-38

In today’s Old Testament lesson, God speaks to the leadership who have returned from captivity in Babylon:

In the second year of King Darius, in the seventh month, on the twenty-first day of the month, the word of the Lord came by the prophet Haggai, saying: Speak now to Zerubbabel son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, and to Joshua son of Jehozadak, the high priest, and to the remnant of the people, and say, Who is left among you that saw this house in its former glory? How does it look to you now? Is it not in your sight as nothing?   (Haggai 1:15-2:9)

Solomon’s Temple was magnificent. But it was destroyed when the Jews were carried away to Babylon. Now the Jews were faced with a daunting task of rebuilding the Temple in Jerusalem. God encourages them:

Yet now take courage, O Zerubbabel, says the Lord; take courage, O Joshua, son of Jehozadak, the high priest; take courage, all you people of the land, says the Lord; work, for I am with you, says the Lord of hosts, according to the promise that I made you when you came out of Egypt. My spirit abides among you; do not fear. For thus says the Lord of hosts: Once again, in a little while, I will shake the heavens and the earth and the sea and the dry land; and I will shake all the nations, so that the treasure of all nations shall come, and I will fill this house with splendor, says the Lord of hosts. The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, says the Lord of hosts. The latter splendor of this house shall be greater than the former, says the Lord of hosts; and in this place I will give prosperity, says the Lord of hosts.   (Haggai 1:15-2:9)

What Temple is God talking about? Is it the second Temple that stood during the earthly ministry of Jesus? Most likely not. That Temple would not last. Reading from the Gospel of John:

The Jews then said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” The Jews then said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?” But he was speaking of the temple of his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.   (John 2:18-22)

The Temple Jesus was speaking about was himself. He would become the Temple of God after his resurrection. Believers would have direct access to God trough him alone. Reading from Mark’s Gospel:

And Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost. And the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom. And when the centurion, which stood over against him, saw that he so cried out, and gave up the ghost, he said, Truly this man was the Son of God.   (Mark 15:37-39)

John had a revelation of the Holy City and the Temple of God:

I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it. Its gates will never be shut by day—and there will be no night there. People will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations. But nothing unclean will enter it, nor anyone who practices abomination or falsehood, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s book of life.   (Revelation 21:22-27)

This is the Temple which will surpass the splendor of Solomon’s Temple. As believers in Christ, we are destined to become a part of this Temple. The Apostel Paul wrote to the Church of Thessaloniki:

But we must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the first fruits for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and through belief in the truth. For this purpose he called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. So then, brothers and sisters, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by our letter.   (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15)

We are called by God to obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. We are now in preparation for that glory. Paul wrote:

I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory about to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the children of God;   (Romans 8:18-19)

From the Book of Job:

For I know that my Redeemer lives,
and that at the last he will stand upon the earth;

and after my skin has been thus destroyed,
then in my flesh I shall see God,

whom I shall see on my side,   (Job 19:25-27)

Job longed for the day when he will share the glory of God. Where do we stand today? Is that our goal, or have we been sidetracked by the fleeting riches of this day? Just as the Temple in Jerusalem was cast down in the 70th year of our Lord, so will be the things of this world.

Is God on our side? Are we on the side of God? Jesus is the greater Temple and we are a part of that Temple. Let us aspire to that high calling and not look back, neither to the right or left.

 

 

Track 2: The Resurrection of the Body

Job 19:23-27a
Psalm 17:1-9
2 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17
Luke 20:27-38

It was a question that wan on Job’s mind:

If mortals die, will they live again?
    All the days of my service I would wait
    until my release should come.
You would call, and I would answer you;
    you would long for the work of your hands.  (Job 14:13-15)

It is a question on many minds. The Sadducees had already settled the question. For them there was no resurrection. In today’s Gospel reading they tested Jesus on the matter:

Some Sadducees, those who say there is no resurrection, came to Jesus and asked him a question, “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man’s brother dies, leaving a wife but no children, the man shall marry the widow and raise up children for his brother. Now there were seven brothers; the first married, and died childless; then the second and the third married her, and so in the same way all seven died childless. Finally the woman also died. In the resurrection, therefore, whose wife will the woman be? For the seven had married her.”   (Luke 20:27-33)

They asked this absurd question because they thought the resurrection was absurd. Jesus answered them:

“Those who belong to this age marry and are given in marriage; but those who are considered worthy of a place in that age and in the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in marriage. Indeed they cannot die anymore, because they are like angels and are children of God, being children of the resurrection. And the fact that the dead are raised Moses himself showed, in the story about the bush, where he speaks of the Lord as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Now he is God not of the dead, but of the living; for to him all of them are alive.”   (Luke 20:34-38)

God is the God of the living. Is God our God? Through much suffering Job came to this conclusion:

“O that my words were written down!
O that they were inscribed in a book!

O that with an iron pen and with lead
they were engraved on a rock forever!

For I know that my Redeemer lives,
and that at the last he will stand upon the earth;

and after my skin has been thus destroyed,
then in my flesh I shall see God,

whom I shall see on my side,
and my eyes shall behold, and not another.”   (Job 19:23-27)

Job came to the realization that the God of the living was his God. God has ordained us for eternal life, not eternal death. Death is a temporary thing. It has been caused by sin. The good news of the Gospel is that Jesus has overcome sin and the grave. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.

For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his. We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin. For whoever has died is freed from sin. But if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.   (Romans 6:3-11)

In today’s Epistle reading Paul writes about eternal salvation in Jesus Christ:

But we must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the first fruits for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and through belief in the truth. For this purpose he called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. So then, brothers and sisters, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by our letter.   (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15)

Paul mentions two essential ingredients that should not be overlooked. If we are to obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus then we need the sanctification by the Spirit as well a belief in the truth of the resurrection. The resurrection has been prepared for us through the cross of Christ. We must take possession of it. If we desire to be raised up like Jesus, then we the work of Holy Spirit in our lives.

Is our God the God of the living? If so, then we will be living in the salvation of his Son.

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The Presentation

bellini2Purification

Today we celebrate The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple by Joseph and Mary. From the Gospel of Luke we read:

When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, the parents of Jesus brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the law of the Lord, “Every firstborn male shall be designated as holy to the Lord”), and they offered a sacrifice according to what is stated in the law of the Lord, “a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons.”  (Luke 2:22-24)

Let us look at this event as if it were part of a three act play. This was the first act of purification – a ceremonial purification. Mary was considered unclean on the birth of her child, according to Jewish law. After a waiting period of about forty days, she and Joseph were required to offer up their son to God. Mary would then be considered pure and her child would be declared holy before God.

A ritual of ceremonial purification was not without meaning or significance. It was a rehearsal of a spiritual purification which was to come. Today, in many churches, parents present their children to God with the expectation that these children will be raised in the Christian Faith.

At the time of Jesus’ presentation the prophet Simeon blessed the family of Jesus and said to Mary:

“This child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too.” (Luke 2:34-35)

This prophecy foretold the second act of purification – a purification of the Law of God. Simeon prophesied that Jesus will bring about major changes in Judaism. Jesus said that he did not come to set aside the law but to fulfill it. The essence of the Law had to do with loving God and neighbor, but it had become merely an elaborate set of rules to follow. As the Word made flesh Jesus demonstrating by his life the true righteous requirements of the law. God requires transparency and truth. We cannot cover up our sins by our works.

Joseph and Mary were presenting Jesus to God in the Temple. Jesus would soon change the whole temple worship by becoming the temple himself. He would become the new Temple by satisfying all the requirements of the old Temple. His blood, spilled on the cross, would become the atoning sacrifice for all our sins once and for all.

From Hebrews we read:

Since God’s children share flesh and blood, Jesus himself likewise shared the same things, so that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil, and free those who all their lives were held in slavery by the fear of death.   (Hebrews 2:14-15)

The last act of purification has to do with the purification of the saints. We read in Malachi:

For he is like a refiner’s fire and like fullers’ soap; he will sit as a refiner and purifier of silver, and he will purify the descendants of Levi and refine them like gold and silver, until they present offerings to the LORD in righteousness. Then the offering of Judah and Jerusalem will be pleasing to the LORD as in the days of old and as in former years.   (Malachi 3:3-4)

The Apostle Paul writes that Jesus, by his atoning sacrifice, is able to present us pure before the Father:

And you who were once estranged and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through death, so as to present you holy and blameless and irreproachable before him — provided that you continue securely established and steadfast in the faith, without shifting from the hope promised by the gospel that you heard, which has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven.   (Colossians 1:21-23)

Paul makes it clear that we must continue in the Faith. Jesus makes this promise for those who do:

“Everyone therefore who acknowledges me before others, I also will acknowledge before my Father in heaven; but whoever denies me before others, I also will deny before my Father in heaven.   (Matthew 10:32-33)

Mary and Joseph presented Jesus holy to God. Jesus turned the tables. He presents Mary and Joseph and all saints as holy to God. Mary and Joseph offered up their son before God. God, the Father, offered His Son as a sacrifice to us all that we may be made holy before him. The Presentation of Jesus is our presentation as well.

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