Tag Archives: Solomon

Labor Day

The Dignity of Work 

Ecclesiasticus 38:27-32a
Psalm 107:1-9 or Psalm 90:1-2, 16-17
1 Corinthians 3:10-14
Matthew 6:19-24

God is our creator. He is the master craftsman of the universe. We are made in his image. Thus, a large part of our life on earth is the discovery of the God-given talent and creativity which he has placed within us. This discovery gives us joy but also contributes to the wellbeing of others.

King Solomon wrote about the skills of the potter:

He molds the clay with his arm and makes it pliable with his feet; he sets his heart to finish the glazing, and he takes care in firing the kiln. All these rely on their hands, and all are skillful in their own work. Without them no city can be inhabited, and wherever they live, they will not go hungry.   (Ecclesiasticus 38:29-32)

We are familiar with King Solomon. He was the wisest and the most wealthy ruler of his time, or perhaps of any time. Yet, Solomon found that all that material wealth was “vanity and striving after wind.” It did not satisfy. Again he wrote:

So I saw that there is nothing better than that all should enjoy their work, for that is their lot; who can bring them to see what will be after them? (Ecclesiastes 3:22)

Solomon was saving the our work itself should provide us satisfaction. The doing is more rewarding than the wages and what they can provide. Thus, whatever we do, let us do it unto the Lord, offering him praise and thanksgiving.

This Labor Day let us pause and rest. But let us also enjoy and appreciate our work and that of others. If we are still on the discovery to find our God-given vocation, we should not give us. God is with us. The psalmist wrote:

May the graciousness of the LORD our God be upon us; prosper the work of our hands; prosper our handiwork.   (Psalm 90:17)

There is great dignity in any kind of work. All work if for the betterment of society. To not work is a drag on society and on others. The Apostle Paul warned:

For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, and we did not eat anyone’s bread without paying for it; but with toil and labor we worked night and day, so that we might not burden any of you. This was not because we do not have that right, but in order to give you an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: Anyone unwilling to work should not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work.   (2 Thessalonians 3:7-11)

While on the earth Jesus never stopped working:

“My Father is still working, and I also am working.”   (John 5:17)
We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”   (John 9:4-5)
We need to follow his example. Soon the darkness will come upon us. We want to be working up to that day in the Kingdom of God. Then we will be prepared to work for him in his millennial reign.
Today, let us pause and give thanks for all our workers and citizen saints who keep us going.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, Labor Day, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 13C

Track 1: I Took Them up in My Arms

Hosea 11:1-11
Psalm 107:1-9, 43
Colossians 3:1-11
Luke 12:13-21

The Children of Israel were not just the children of Israel. They were the Children of God. This is how God describes them to the Prophet Hosea:

When Israel was a child, I loved him,
    and out of Egypt I called my son.
The more I called them,
    the more they went from me;
they kept sacrificing to the Baals,
    and offering incense to idols.

Yet it was I who taught Ephraim to walk,
    I took them up in my arms;
    but they did not know that I healed them.
I led them with cords of human kindness,
    with bands of love.
I was to them like those
    who lift infants to their cheeks.
    I bent down to them and fed them.   (Hosea 11:1-11)

When Jesus went up to Jerusalem one last time to face his crucifixion, he stopped to weep over the city:

Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!   (Matthew 23:37)

In the days of Hosea, Israel had turned away from God. Over and over again, Israel continued to do so, even to the point of crucifying God’s own Son. Did they not realize that it was God who fed them, protected them, and delivered them in times of trouble?

The psalmist wrote:

They were hungry and thirsty;
their spirits languished within them.

Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,
and he delivered them from their distress.

He put their feet on a straight path
to go to a city where they might dwell.

Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy
and the wonders he does for his children.   (Psalm 107:5-8)

God is the Father of Israel. He is also our Father. He is the Father of all things. What father does not want to provide for his children, does not want to look after them, protect them, and teach them? Have we every experienced our own children ignore us or push us away at times? If so, how did that make us feel?

Unfortunately, it seems, that part of our human nature is to want to prove to ourselves that we can get along on our own. Not only did Israel forsake their Father. At times in our lives we have done the same. God patiently waits for us to return to him. He is our loving Father He wants us to discover, on our own, that we need him.

What happens if we continually we ignore the truth? Insecurity starts to set in. Worry and anxiety may then overtake us.

In today’s Gospel Jesus tells that parable about the rich fool. He tears down his barns and builds bigger barns to store up supplies for the future. Are riches ever enough? For a moment the rich fool is able to bask in his wealth. But things quickly change for him. From Luke:

I will say to my soul, `Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’ But God said to him, `You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”  (Luke 12:19-21)

Greed is not the only reason for wanting to amass a fortune. The future is uncertain. Without God, things will always be uncertain. Our earthly riches, whatever they may be, will ultimately fail us. But we have greater riches which God has given us . He has given us his only begotten Son to secure our future, both for now and for an eternity. Today, where is our treasure?

God still wants to take us in his arms. Will we let him today? Can we find in our hearts a love for God, the one who loves us and will never fail us?

 

 

Track 2: Heavenly Treasure

Ecclesiastes 1:2, 12-14; 2:18-23
Psalm 49:1-11
Colossians 3:1-11
Luke 12:13-21

In today’s Gospel Jesus tells the parable of the rich fool:

“The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, `What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, `I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, `Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’ But God said to him, `You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”   (Luke 12:16-21)

King Solomon echos a similar theme in Ecclesiastes:

I turned and gave my heart up to despair concerning all the toil of my labors under the sun, because sometimes one who has toiled with wisdom and knowledge and skill must leave all to be enjoyed by another who did not toil for it. This also is vanity and a great evil.   (Ecclesiastes 2:20-21)

A crude paraphrase might be: You cannot take it with you. Worldly riches are eventually cut off by death alone, if not otherwise. The psalmist writes:

The wickedness of those who put their trust in their goods,
and boast of their great riches?

We can never ransom ourselves,
or deliver to God the price of our life;

For the ransom of our life is so great,
that we should never have enough to pay it,

In order to live for ever and ever,
and never see the grave.

For we see that the wise die also;
like the dull and stupid they perish
and leave their wealth to those who come after them.   (Psalm 49:5-9)

Death is a great obstacle. It is a fact of life that we cannot overcome. There is only one person that has defeated death – the Lord Jesus Christ who died on a cross and rose again on the third day. Because of his victory we, too, can now overcome death.

The Apostle Paul explains that we have been buried with Christ in our baptism. When we identify with the death of Christ we no longer live to ourselves. We now have a new life in him through his resurrection. From today’s Epistle:

If you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth, for you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When C.hrist who is your life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory.   (Colossians 3:1-4)

Our riches is not of this world. We are destined for a glorious life which is eternal. Are we still storying up treasures on earth? This earth is passing away. Our old lives have already passed away if we are in Christ. Paul tells us not to look back, but to look above. We are now living in the resurrection. Death has lost its power.

Paul writes:

When this perishable body puts on imperishability, and this mortal body puts on immortality, then the saying that is written will be fulfilled:

“Death has been swallowed up in victory.”
“Where, O death, is your victory?
    Where, O death, is your sting?”   (1 Corinthians 15:54-56)

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year C