Tag Archives: signs and wonders

Friday in the Fifth Week of Lent

The Works of the Father

The miracles that Jesus did on the earth testified that he came from God the Father. The Jewish leaders could not deny the works, although they attempted to do so in the beginning without success. However, these obvious works, miracles, and hearings, which only God could do, did not stop them from rejecting Jesus:

The Jews took up stones again to stone Jesus. Jesus replied, “I have shown you many good works from the Father. For which of these are you going to stone me?” The Jews answered, “It is not for a good work that we are going to stone you, but for blasphemy, because you, though only a human being, are making yourself God.” Jesus answered, “Is it not written in your law, ‘I said, you are gods’? If those to whom the word of God came were called ‘gods’ —and the scripture cannot be annulled— can you say that the one whom the Father has sanctified and sent into the world is blaspheming because I said, ‘I am God’s Son’? If I am not doing the works of my Father, then do not believe me. But if I do them, even though you do not believe me, believe the works, so that you may know and understand that the Father is in me and I am in the Father.”   (John 10:31–38)

Why is so much effort made to deny the obvious signs of God? We can look to Jeremiah for a clue:

I have become a laughingstock all the day;
every one mocks me.
For whenever I speak, I cry out,
I shout, “Violence and destruction!”
For the word of the Lord has become for me
a reproach and derision all day long.
If I say, “I will not mention him,
or speak any more in his name,”
there is in my heart as it were a burning fire
shut up in my bones,
and I am weary with holding it in,
and I cannot.   (Jeremiah 20:7–9)

People deny God because they do not want to be mocked. The world we live in is all about mocking God. That is what Satan does and that is what he intimidates us to do. But mocking God has consequences:

Do not be deceived; God is not mocked, for you reap whatever you sow. If you sow to your own flesh, you will reap corruption from the flesh; but if you sow to the Spirit, you will reap eternal life from the Spirit.   (Galatians 6:7-8)

Do we love the praise of men more that the praise of God. If so, there is ultimately a high price to pay. But if we are true disciples of Jesus, then his presence and Spirit more than compensates for the persecution in this world, and in the end, life eternal in his glorious kingdom.

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Filed under Jesus, lectionary, Lent, Lenten daily readings, Lenten study, Revised Common Lectionary, Year C

The Season of The Epiphany

17monaco1In the liturgical church the Christmas Season is preceded by the Season of Advent and followed by the Season of The Epiphany. These two bookends extend and enrich the Christmas celebration. Advent is a season of preparation whereby we examine our hearts in the light of Christ. The Christmas Season begins on Christmas Day extends for twelve days up to the celebration of The Epiphany. The word “Epiphany” comes from epiphaneia in the Koine Greek which means “manifestation.”

The Feast of The Epiphany is January 6. In the Western Church, The Epiphany traditionally observes the visitation of the Magi. Eastern Christians, on the other hand, commemorate the baptism of Jesus as The Epiphany. Both events clearly manifest that Jesus is the Son of God.

The actual length of the Season of Epiphany depends on the date when Easter will be celebrated. Thus, in some liturgical years the season is longer than others. Throughout the Season of Epiphany we explore numerous and various ways in which God has revealed himself to us in scripture. God is always revealing himself to those who will open their eyes and hearts:

I love those who love me,
and those who seek me find me.  (Proverbs 8:17)

You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.  (Jeremiah 29:13)

He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him. (John 14:21)

The wisemen from the East were seeking the Lord. They did not fully understand who they were seeking but it did not stop them from doing so. They traveled a long distance and were willing to make sacrifices. We may look upon our life as a journey. What do we seek? Whom do we seek? And what sacrifices are we willing to make in our day? Will we set aside a time in our lives to seek God with all our hearts?

 

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Filed under Epiphany, Feast Day, Holy Day, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C