Tag Archives: Satan

Twenty Third Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 25B

JOB-FINALTrack 1: True Repentance

Job 42:1-6, 10-17
Psalm 34:1-8, (19-22)
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 10:46-52

In today’s Old Testament reading, Job answers the question that God asked him: “Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?”

“I know that you can do all things,
and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted.

‘Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’

Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand,
things too wonderful for me, which I did not know.

‘Hear, and I will speak;
I will question you, and you declare to me.’

I had heard of you by the hearing of the ear,
but now my eye sees you;

therefore I despise myself,
and repent in dust and ashes.”   (Job 42:2-6)

What does it mean to repent in dust and ashes? When Abraham prayed for the city of Sodom he was careful to tell God how he considered his position. From Genesis we read:

And the Lord said, “If I find at Sodom fifty righteous in the city, I will forgive the whole place for their sake.” Abraham answered, “Let me take it upon myself to speak to the Lord, I who am but dust and ashes. Suppose five of the fifty righteous are lacking? Will you destroy the whole city for lack of five?” And he said, “I will not destroy it if I find forty-five there.”   (Genesis 18:26-28)

The expression dust and ashes which Abraham used was a way that Abraham humbled himself before God. Abraham understood the fallen nature of humankind. Dust signified this fallen condition. Again from Genesis:

By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread until you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”   (Genesis 3:19)

The Prophet Jonah was called by God to proclaim the destruction of Nineveh because of the wickedness of the city:

Jonah began to go into the city, going a day’s walk. And he cried out, “Forty days more, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!” And the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast, and everyone, great and small, put on sackcloth.

When the news reached the king of Nineveh, he rose from his throne, removed his robe, covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. Then he had a proclamation made in Nineveh: “By the decree of the king and his nobles: No human being or animal, no herd or flock, shall taste anything. They shall not feed, nor shall they drink water. Human beings and animals shall be covered with sackcloth, and they shall cry mightily to God. All shall turn from their evil ways and from the violence that is in their hands.   (Jonah 3:4-8)

The entire city sat in ashes as a sign of their repentance. They were saying that they took the word of the Lord seriously. They were also saying that they recognized their fault and their position before God.

Repentance is not some casual contract that we make with God. We cannot say we are sorry and that we will try to do better without a sincere acknowledgment that we have offended against God and his holy laws. We cannot negotiate with God from a position of pride. We must show the greatest humility before him and true sorrow for our sins.

The psalmist wrote:

I will bless the Lord at all times;
his praise shall ever be in my mouth.

I will glory in the Lord;
let the humble hear and rejoice.

Proclaim with me the greatness of the Lord;
let us exalt his Name together.

I sought the Lord, and he answered me
and delivered me out of all my terror.

Look upon him and be radiant,
and let not your faces be ashamed.

I called in my affliction and the Lord heard me
and saved me from all my troubles.

The angel of the Lord encompasses those who fear him,
and he will deliver them.

Taste and see that the Lord is good;
happy are they who trust in him!   (Psalm 34:1-8)

In order to be heard by God we must humble ourselves before him. He must honor him with great respect and reverence. As the psalmist wrote, we must “fear” him. Only from this position can we expect forgiveness and blessings from God.

There is another attitude and position we might take before. Such was that of Satan. From the Prophet Ezekiel we read:

Your heart was proud because of your beauty;
    you corrupted your wisdom for the sake of your splendor.
I cast you to the ground;
    I exposed you before kings,
    to feast their eyes on you.
By the multitude of your iniquities,
    in the unrighteousness of your trade,
    you profaned your sanctuaries.
So I brought out fire from within you;
    it consumed you,
and I turned you to ashes on the earth
    in the sight of all who saw you.
All who know you among the peoples
    are appalled at you;
you have come to a dreadful end
    and shall be no more forever.   (Ezekiel 28:17-19)

There is no shame in asking God for forgiveness. On the other hand, there can be no pride in repentance.

 

 

 

Track 2: Spiritual Sight

Jeremiah 31:7-9
Psalm 126
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 10:46-52

We know that Jesus in his earthly ministry healed the sick, cast out demons, and raised the dead. Nonetheless, he did not perform such ministries for everyone he met. How did he happen to choose a certain blind beggar for healing? From today’s Gospel we read:

Jesus and his disciples came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.   (Mark 10:46-52)

What was special about Bartimaeus? Bartimaeus knew who Jesus was. He cried out to Jesus, calling him “Son of David.” He knew the prophecy concerning the Messiah and he reasoned that Jesus was that Messiah. Not only that, but Bartimaeus cried out with faith and hope that Jesus would minister to him. And although he was blind, he “sprang up and came to Jesus.” He was prepared to move boldly when the opportunity presented itself. And lastly, Bartimaeus called Jesus “my teacher.”

Bartimaeus was not only interested in his physical healing, he also sought spiritual healing. Though he was blind he was able to see spiritually. He was able to see more in Jesus than many of the followers of Jesus.

Barimaeus, by his own words, indicated that he was a spiritual follower of Jesus. When he received his physical sight he was prepared to take the next step. He “followed him on the way.”

What could be worst than physical blindness for those who are attempting to navigate this world? This answer is “spiritual blindness.” If we are to live out a life acceptable to God that a high priest who has been made perfect forever. Only he can be our permanent offering before God for the sins we have committed. From Hebrews we read:

For it was fitting that we should have such a high priest, holy, blameless, undefiled, separated from sinners, and exalted above the heavens. Unlike the other high priests, he has no need to offer sacrifices day after day, first for his own sins, and then for those of the people; this he did once for all when he offered himself. For the law appoints as high priests those who are subject to weakness, but the word of the oath, which came later than the law, appoints a Son who has been made perfect forever.   (Hebrews 7:26-28)

Bartimaeus was looking for more than a healer. He was looking for a Savior who would take away all of his sins. Are we looking for such a Savior? Only spiritual blindness can keep us from seeking and finding Jesus. He came to save us, but we must be looking for him so that we may follow him. He said:

Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.   (John 14:6)

For Jesus to accomplish his work as High Priest on our behalf we must be willing, each day, to “follow him on the way.”

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Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 22B

Track 1: Receiving the Kingdom of God

Job 1:1; 2:1-10
Psalm 26
Hebrews 1:1-4; 2:5-12
Mark 10:2-16

We are familiar with the story of how Satan asked God to test Job and his faith:

One day the heavenly beings came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came among them to present himself before the Lord. The Lord said to Satan, “Where have you come from?” Satan answered the Lord, “From going to and fro on the earth, and from walking up and down on it.” The Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one like him on the earth, a blameless and upright man who fears God and turns away from evil. He still persists in his integrity, although you incited me against him, to destroy him for no reason.” Then Satan answered the Lord, “Skin for skin! All that people have they will give to save their lives. But stretch out your hand now and touch his bone and his flesh, and he will curse you to your face.” The Lord said to Satan, “Very well, he is in your power; only spare his life.”

So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord, and inflicted loathsome sores on Job from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head. Job took a potsherd with which to scrape himself, and sat among the ashes.

As we know, Satan is the “accuser of the brethren.” He specializes in bringing us down. Job was living n a lofty perch.

The psalmist wrote:

Give judgment for me, O Lord,
for I have lived with integrity;
I have trusted in the Lord and have not faltered.

Test me, O Lord, and try me;
examine my heart and my mind.

For your love is before my eyes;
I have walked faithfully with you.

I have not sat with the worthless,
nor do I consort with the deceitful.   (Psalm 26:1-4)

This psalm was true of Job. He was head and shoulders above his peers. What could be possibly missing in Job’s? Job was outstanding in every way. This much we can say, Satan’s plan was not God’s plan. What Satan meant for ill God meant for good.

Job is a very difficult book to understand. It has numerous interpretations. It plunges very deep into the human psyche and raised many theological issues. It is an important book. We need to wrestle with it. And we need to read it in context with the rest of the Bible.

How does today’s Gospel reading impinge upon Job? Or does it? We read from Mark:

People were bringing little children to him in order that he might touch them; and the disciples spoke sternly to them. But when Jesus saw this, he was indignant and said to them, “Let the little children come to me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs. Truly I tell you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will never enter it.” And he took them up in his arms, laid his hands on them, and blessed them.   (Mark 10:13-16)

Was Job not as innocent as these little children? Well, we all realize that children are not really innocent, especially as parents. Jesus saying something about children? I believe the key word here is “receive.” We must receive the kingdom of God like children. Children are dependent upon us as parents, teachers, and mentors. They have been placed in a position that requires them to be dependent. On their own, they are not able to contend with some of the challenges of life.

Job was highly successful. He had all that he needed to enable him to live a somewhat independent life. Was he missing something? Perhaps he was missing the concept that he, too, was a dependent person certain ways. On his own, he was not going to enter the kingdom of God. No one can earn their place in the kingdom, not even people like Job. In fact, people who are like Job will have the same disadvantage he had.

Job needed God. He needed his love. He needed his forgiveness. He needed his mercy. He needed to acknowledge that his very life came from God and was sustained by God.  When Job eventually gave up on determining what may be missing in him, God asked him this question: “Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?” (Job 38:4) God is God. He is the creator. He is the eternal one. We cannot do anything to impress him. The question for us is: “Has God done enough to impress us?”

Jesus said: “Do not be afraid, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.” (Luke 12:32) We cannot earn what God the Father desires to give us by his grace alone. Jesus has earned the kingdom for us. Yet we must receive it with thanksgiving and awe. We are, in fact, all God’s little children.

My very young granddaughter painted me a picture. On it she wrote: “Love is the complete abandonment. I give myself to you.” Her concept of love is beyond her years. Her statement helped me to better understand what I need to say in this homily. Today, am I able to surrender my crown to the one who wore a crown of thorns for me?

 

 

Track 2: The Institution of Marriage

Genesis 2:18-24
Psalm 8
Hebrews 1:1-4; 2:5-12
Mark 10:2-16

The family unit is the basic building block of society. God used the institution of marriage to build and preserve it. From Genesis we read:

And the rib that the Lord God had taken from the man he made into a woman and brought her to the man. Then the man said,

“This at last is bone of my bones
and flesh of my flesh;

this one shall be called Woman,
for out of Man this one was taken.”

Therefore a man leaves his father and his mother and clings to his wife, and they become one flesh.   ()

Recently someone said to me that the institution of marriage has failed. That seemed like a strange way of saying it. The person who said it was a church-goer. Have we not failed the institution rather than the other way around?  Perhaps what this person said was not so foreign to today’s Church since the divorce rate of churchgoers is the same as non church-goers.

Why is marriage so important to the family? It ensures strong parenting. God blesses marriages. If we live within his guidelines the parents become very strong individuals. They reenforce one another because, through marriage, they really do become one flesh. The parents who are one flesh are needed to raise children as God has intended. A man is really an incomplete parent without a wife. This is true for a woman as well.

But today we have the so-called “modern” family. Almost anything goes. The rules have been changed. The goal posts have been moved. When we find that we cannot obey God’s commandments today, we either ignore them or weaken them. This is true for society in general and it is also true for the Church.

Today is no exception. This was true in the time of Moses. From Mark’s Gospel we read:

Some Pharisees came, and to test Jesus they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”   (Mark 10:2-9)

Jesus was saying that when God declares something he does not change his mind later. We want to change things because we find it difficult to do all the things which God declares. The institution of marriage has not failed. God has not failed. He does not fail us. We fail him! What do we do when this happens? Jesus makes it clear that we cannot changer the rules and have God go along with us.

Divorce is not an unpardonable offense. When we fail at something we need to confess what we have done and not try to cover it up. Repentance is a large part of the Christian faith. God can help us in our weaknesses, but we must seek his help. Repentance is the framework. The cross of Jesus does not cover unconfessed sin. This may be news to some churches, but it is not news to the New Testament, Pauline theology, and the First Epistle of John.

If we do not follow God’s plans for us we ultimately become very weak. Our lives come more like the lives of worldly people. A great revival is needed. It must begin in the household of God. A reformation in the Church is needed. Reformation does not mean more watering down. The “seeker” church is not the reformed church. Moving the goal posts is not reformation.

In the meantime, we need to provide greater support for marriages and families. We need to provide the greatest support to unwed mothers and for those in broken homes and single parent homes. God does not fail them. We have failed them. Sincere repentance with humbly hearts will help usher in new beginnings. Christianity is always about new beginnings.

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Saint Michael and All Angels

Spiritual Warfare

We are in a battle on this earth. The battle has been ongoing for a long time but it did not begin here. The battle began in heaven:

And war broke out in heaven; Michael and his angels fought against the dragon. The dragon and his angels fought back, but they were defeated, and there was no longer any place for them in heaven. The great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.   (Revelation 12:7-9)

We are in an epic battle and we must understand who our real enemy is. The Apostle Paul writes:

For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this age, against spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.   (Ephesians 6:12)

We are fighting the forces of evil. Evil is real. We cannot defeat it by our own strength. Fortunately, we are not in this battle alone. God is with us. His holy angels are on our side. The archangel Michael and his angels are still fighting for us. Today, we honor Michael and all the holy angels.

Yet, it is important for us to understand that we do not worship angles but the One true God who has made us all. Again, the Apostle Paul writes:

Do not let anyone disqualify you, insisting on self-abasement and worship of angels, dwelling on visions, puffed up without cause by a human way of thinking,   (Colossians 2:18)

Angels are not to be worshipped. They are to be honored. Let us show our appreciation for the warring angels through our prayers. The psalmist wrote:

The Lord has set his throne in heaven,
and his kingship has dominion over all.

Bless the Lord, you angels of his,
you mighty ones who do his bidding,
and hearken to the voice of his word.

Bless the Lord, all you his hosts,
you ministers of his who do his will.   (Psalm 103:19-21)

We can give thanks to God for our guardian angels, but we should not pray to them, or to anyone else, but God alone.

The holy angels are fighting against evil and we must also fight evil. We have two primary weapons to do so. In Revelation we read:

Then I heard a loud voice in heaven, proclaiming,

“Now have come the salvation and the power
and the kingdom of our God
and the authority of his Messiah,

for the accuser of our comrades has been thrown down,
who accuses them day and night before our God.

But they have conquered him by the blood of the Lamb
and by the word of their testimony,

for they did not cling to life even in the face of death.   (Revelation 12:10-12)

We have the blood of Jesus which covers our sins. This gives us access to the throne of God. By faith in the blood of Jesus we appropriate the righteousness of God in Christ. Thus we have authority over the devil. That is important to understand because prayer is our primary weapon against evil. We can bind evil with our prayers because we have authority over evil by the blood of the Lamb, our Lord Jesus Christ

Our faith must be complimented by our testimony, however, if our prayer is to be effective. If we claim the blood of Jesus then we must boldly tell others. Our prayers are also made powerful by the word of our testimony. Let us be bold as the Archangel Michael and not shrink back from the face of evil in this world. Amen.

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