Tag Archives: salvation

Saint Mary the Virgin

Il_Sassoferrato_-_Madonna_with_the_Christ_Child_-_WGA20874Faith in God’s Promises

The prophets of old foretold the Messiah and His ministry, but who could grasp all that they were saying?

Who has believed our message
and to whom has the arm of the LORD been revealed?
He grew up before him like a tender shoot,
and like a root out of dry ground.
He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him,
nothing in his appearance that we should desire him.
He was despised and rejected by men,
a man of sorrows, and familiar with suffering.
Like one from whom men hide their faces
he was despised, and we esteemed him not.  (Isaiah 53:1-3)

Mary understood that God had made promises to Abraham and she believed that He would keep them. She lived through terrible circumstances but never gave up her hope and trust in the Lord. Her God was full of love and mercy. Her reverence and humility before God are without question.

“My soul magnifies the Lord,
And my spirit has rejoiced in God my Savior.
For He has regarded the lowly state of His maidservant;
For behold, henceforth all generations will call me blessed.
For He who is mighty has done great things for me,
And holy is His name.
And His mercy is on those who fear Him
From generation to generation.
He has shown strength with His arm;
He has scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts.
He has put down the mighty from their thrones,
And exalted the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things,
And the rich He has sent away empty.
He has helped His servant Israel,
In remembrance of His mercy,
As He spoke to our fathers,
To Abraham and to his seed forever.”   (Luke 1:46-55)

Mary did not always fully grasp the ministry of her son, however. We cannot fault her for that. There was no one ever like Jesus, either before or since. As the prophet Simeon foretold, her heart would be pierced and she would gain a greater understanding.

“Indeed, this child is destined to cause the fall and rise of many in Israel and to be a sign that will be opposed— and a sword will pierce your own soul—that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.”  (Luke 2:34-35)

Our hearts must be pierced also if we are to understand the ministry and message of Jesus. How closely we follow Jesus in our lives will telegraph what we truly believe. Will we go the distance with Him as did His mother Mary? Mary was at the cross when most of Jesus’ disciples fled. She could not turn away. Her love for God was so great. She walked in the steps of Abraham who was willing to sacrifice his own son if that were required by God.

What is our witness today? Are we highly favored of God? We may not understand all that is going on. We may not fully grasp the miracle that God is working out. Nonetheless, we can still believe and trust in the promises of God as did Mary. Let us pray for grace to endure the pain while eagerly anticipating our Lord’s victory with patience and endurance? Mary did this and so much more. Her enduring faith and courage has inspired the Church down to this day.

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Nativity of St. John the Baptist

The Path of Peace

To fully under John the Baptist’s ministry we need to return to his nativity. When John was eight days old he was brought to the temple to be circumcised as was the custom. His father then prophesied over him:

And you, my child, will be called a prophet of the Most High;
for you will go on before the Lord to prepare the way for him,
to give his people the knowledge of salvation
through the forgiveness of their sins,
because of the tender mercy of our God,
by which the rising sun will come to us from heaven
to shine on those living in darkness
and in the shadow of death,
to guide our feet into the path of peace.” (Luke 1:75-79)
The path of peace theme is also echoed in the prophecy of Isaiah:

Comfort, O comfort my people,
    says your God.
Speak tenderly to Jerusalem,
    and cry to her
that she has served her term,
    that her penalty is paid,
that she has received from the Lord’s hand
    double for all her sins.

A voice cries out:
“In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord,
    make straight in the desert a highway for our God.
Every valley shall be lifted up,
    and every mountain and hill be made low;
the uneven ground shall become level,
    and the rough places a plain.
Then the glory of the Lord shall be revealed,
    and all people shall see it together,
    for the mouth of the Lord has spoken.”   (Isaiah 40:1-5)

There is only one way to peace and well-being: Jesus is that way. He is the Prince of Peace. Today, we are hearing about another peace. It is said that a peace will be provided by a new world order and a one world government and a one world religion. How much should we trust this peace? Paul writes to the Church in Thessalonica:

For you yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so comes as a thief in the night. For when they say, “Peace and safety!” then sudden destruction comes upon them, as labor pains upon a pregnant woman. And they shall not escape. But you, brethren, are not in darkness, so that this Day should overtake you as a thief.   (1 Thessalonians 5:2-4)

We need to return to the message of John the Baptist. He made it clear that we must repent of our sins and seek the real Messiah. John prepared the way for Him. Jesus has prepared the way to the Father. Thomas, the disciple of Jesus was confused about this matter:

Thomas said to him, “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?” Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.   (John 14:5-6)

Are we still confused today concerning the way of peace? John the Baptist’s message was very simple. Only rebellious hearts seek to ignore it.

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Trinity Sunday, Year B

Life through the Spirit

Today we celebrate Trinity Sunday in many liturgical churches around the world. The third person of the Trinity is perhaps the most controversial if not the most neglected person of the Godhead. We have sermons and teachings on God the Father and God the Son almost every week. How much do we hear about the Holy Spirit of God?

If we were to boil down the importance of the Holy Spirit to one phrase we might say that the Holy Spirit is the “life-giver.” From Genesis we read:

The Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the man became a living being.  (Genesis 2:7)

The Holy Spirit is thought to be the breath of God. Without his breath we cannot live. The Apostle Paul wrote: “The Spirit gives life.” (2 Corinthians 3:6)

When Nicodemus visits Jesus at night, unlike many other Jewish leaders, he acknowledged that Jesus must have come from God  Jesus responded to him in a curious way:

“Very truly, I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God without being born from above.” Nicodemus said to him, “How can anyone be born after having grown old? Can one enter a second time into the mother’s womb and be born?” Jesus answered, “Very truly, I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit. What is born of the flesh is flesh, and what is born of the Spirit is spirit. Do not be astonished that I said to you, ‘You must be born from above.’ The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”   (John 3:3-8)

Jesus was saying that the Spirit gives life. He is talking about a new life sustained by the Holy Spirit. This life comes as a gift from God above, yet it is a life that must be received and lived in. This life has a force of its own, like the wind, and must be allowed to chart a new course and direction for those who embrace it.

How we cooperate with the Holy Spirit is all important. The Gospel of John speaks powerful about the Holy Spirit and the writings of Paul add much-needed theological commentary. As Christians, we cannot ignore the importance of the Holy Spirit.

Some may think: “I have Jesus and the cross. That is enough for me.” Yes, it is, provided that we understand that the cross of Christ is also our cross. Paul writes:

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set you free from the law of sin and of death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do: by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and to deal with sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, so that the just requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.   (Romans 8:1-4)

Jesus fulfilled the just requirements of the law of God by his death on the cross, because the wages of sin is death. When we accept Jesus as our Savior, he washes us clean from all our sin. We need to no longer live under the penalty of what might be called the old law of God or the law of sin and death. But what do we now live under?

The Apostle Paul tells us that the law of the Spirit has replaced the law of sin and death. We are no longer subject to this old law. Paul writes:

But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law. Now the works of the flesh are obvious: fornication, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, anger, quarrels, dissensions, factions, envy, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these. I am warning you, as I warned you before: those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

By contrast, the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. There is no law against such things. And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. If we live by the Spirit, let us also be guided by the Spirit.   (Galatians 5:18-25)

This law of the Spirit is a higher law under which we can live by through the empowerment of the Holy Spirit. Paul goes on to say that we must choose this new law:

So then, brothers and sisters, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh — for if you live according to the flesh, you will die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. For all who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. For you did not receive a spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received a spirit of adoption. When we cry, “Abba! Father!” it is that very Spirit bearing witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs, heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ– if, in fact, we suffer with him so that we may also be glorified with him.   (Romans 8:12-17)

In other words, we must choose to allow the Holy Spirit of God to govern our lives. To choose not to live by the Spirit is to choose death over life. Jesus said that he came to “give us life and life more abundantly.” The Apostle Paul wrote: “If you live according to the flesh, you will die.” The flesh only leads to death and decay. Satan wants to steal our lives from us by having us concentrate on the flesh, or worldly passions. Our minds and hearts need to be on the Spirit.

However, it will cost us to live by the Spirit. We will experience persecution. We will have our own cross to take up daily. Does this sound like the Christian faith we have been taught? Perhaps it is time for us to grow up and become the children of God and not the children of this world. This world is passing away. Those who live by the Spirit are being renewed day by day.

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