Tag Archives: Saint Joseph

Second Sunday after Christmas

Old Testament Readings

Track 1: Out of Egypt I Have Called My Son

Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus, was responsive to God’s call and direction. We see this when he was willing to marry Mary who was already with child. Today’s Gospel reading offers another example of his responsiveness:

After the wise men had left, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Get up, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and remain there until I tell you; for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy him.” Then Joseph got up, took the child and his mother by night, and went to Egypt, and remained there until the death of Herod. This was to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet, “Out of Egypt I have called my son.”   (Matthew 2:13-15)

How quickly things can change! After receiving gifts and honor from the wisemen, the family of Jesus had to immediately flee to Egypt for safety from Herod.

Egypt was a temporary home. It was not a place where one would want to remain. Sometimes in life we are put in a holding pattern, so to speak. Why is that? The Prophet Jeremiah wrote:

Hear the word of the Lord, O nations,
and declare it in the coastlands far away;

say, “He who scattered Israel will gather him,
and will keep him as a shepherd a flock.”

For the Lord has ransomed Jacob,
and has redeemed him from hands too strong for him.

They shall come and sing aloud on the height of Zion,
and they shall be radiant over the goodness of the Lord,

over the grain, the wine, and the oil,
and over the young of the flock and the herd;

their life shall become like a watered garden,
and they shall never languish again.   (Jeremiah 31:10-12)

For a season, God will keep us protected from those who want to damage or destroy us. Their hands are too strong for us to resist. While doing so, he is preparing us to step out in higher realm of service. The Apostle Paul wrote to the Church in Ephesus:

I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power.   (Ephesians 1:17-19)

Are we ready to learn about the immeasurable greatness of God’s power for us who believe? Our defense is not dependent upon our power but on the power of an almighty God! God wants to enlighten our hearts to the riches of his glorious inheritance. We do not gain this understanding overnight. Nonetheless, if we put our full faith and trust in God he will teach us, step by step, provided that we hold on to his promises. The devil will attempt to distract us. He will try to sew seeds of unbelief. 

However, if we are attentive to God’s word as was Joseph, we will not miss what God has prepared for us. We read in Proverbs:

Trust in the Lord with all your heart,
    and do not rely on your own insight.
In all your ways acknowledge him,
    and he will make straight your paths.
Do not be wise in your own eyes;
    fear the Lord, and turn away from evil.
It will be a healing for your flesh
    and a refreshment for your body.   (Proverbs 3:5-8)

God has called us out of Egypt. Let us follow where he leads us.

 

Track 2: I Must Be in My Father’s House

Today we read from the Gospel of Luke about an incident that occurred in the life of Jesus when he was only twelve years old:

Now every year his parents went to Jerusalem for the festival of the Passover. And when he was twelve years old, they went up as usual for the festival. When the festival was ended and they started to return, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but his parents did not know it.   (Luke 2:41-43)

Later we read that they had to go back to Jerusalem to search for him when discovering that Jesus was missing:

When they did not find him, they returned to Jerusalem to search for him. After three days they found him in the temple, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. And all who heard him were amazed at his understanding and his answers. When his parents saw him they were astonished; and his mother said to him, “Child, why have you treated us like this? Look, your father and I have been searching for you in great anxiety.” He said to them, “Why were you searching for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?”   (Luke 2:45-49)

We understand by his answer to his parents that he was still a child. But at the time he was beginning to understand what his mission might be and the importance of God’s Word and teaching.

As disciples many of us are still babes in Christ. Have we discovered find our identity, purpose, and direction must be found God’s presence and not in the distractions of this world. The psalmist wrote:

How dear to me is your dwelling, O Lord of hosts!
My soul has a desire and longing for the courts of the Lord;
my heart and my flesh rejoice in the living God.

The sparrow has found her a house
and the swallow a nest where she may lay her young;
by the side of your altars, O Lord of hosts,
my King and my God.

Happy are they who dwell in your house!
they will always be praising you.   (Psalm 84)

Do we rejoice in the living God? Do we long for his presence? If not, then we are dying along with unbelievers in a decaying and dying world. Are we seeking to know him and follow him along the path that he has laid out for us? The Apostle Paul wrote to the Church in Ephesus:

I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power.   (Ephesians 1:17-19)

This type of learning about God only comes from God. It comes by remaining close to God. A verse rom the Prophet Isaiah:

“Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord,
    to the house of the God of Jacob;
that he may teach us his ways
    and that we may walk in his paths.”
For out of Zion shall go forth instruction,
    and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.   (Isaiah 2:3)

God will teach us, but we must seek his presence and council always. Will we say: “I must be in my Father’s house?”

 

 

Track 3: A Ruler to Shepherd My People Israel

In today’s Gospel reading we find Herod worried and perplexed:

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah[c] was to be born. They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet:

‘And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
    are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
    who is to shepherd my people Israel.’”   (Matthew 2:2-6)

Herod was afraid of this child that was said to have been born a king. Herod was king and he was not looking for a replacement. What Herod did not recognize was that this new king would not only take his place, but also the places of every would be ruler on the earth. He would not be like Herod or any other king.

Jesus would be the shepherd king. He would be a ruler that shepherded the people of God rather than dictating to them what they must do. In other words, Jesus would lead them by example and lovingly teach them his ways. Is that the type of ruler that we want?

The Apostle Paul wrote:

I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power.   (Ephesians 1:17-19)

A new world is coming. It is a world lead by the shepherd king. Each of us will have a place in it. Each of us will have an assignment, provided we all our Lord Jesus to prepare us and teach us his ways. If we think his world will be like our world, if we think his rule will be like the rulers of this world, then we do not know him. We would not have not received a spirit of wisdom and revelation from him because we did not look in his direction.

God is working in us, his Son is shining in us, his power is surging through us when we realize that he is not only our king, but he is the shepherd of our souls.

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Fourth Sunday of Advent, Year A

The Obedience of the Faith

The Apostle Paul was never able to visit the Church of Rome, though that was his strong desire. Nevertheless, he wrote an epistle to this Church which is perhaps the greatest example of systematic theology ever written. In today’s epistle reading we find Paul introducing himself to the Church of Rome:

Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy scriptures, the gospel concerning his Son, who was descended from David according to the flesh and was declared to be Son of God with power according to the spirit of holiness by resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord, through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles for the sake of his name, including yourselves who are called to belong to Jesus Christ …   (Romans 1:1-6)

Paul states his purpose very clearly. Paul wants to “bring about the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles.” This may be an unusual way to express faith for many people. Obedience – how important is obedience to our faith?

Let us look at the example of Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus. From today’s Gospel reading:

Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way. When his mother Mary had been engaged to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit. Her husband Joseph, being a righteous man and unwilling to expose her to public disgrace, planned to dismiss her quietly. But just when he had resolved to do this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet:

“Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son,
    and they shall name him Emmanuel,”

which means, “God is with us.”   (Matthew 1:18-23)

A child had never been conceived by the Holy Spirit without any involvement of a husband. Joseph could not have fully understood what this meant. It was certainly not in his plans for marriage. Yet, Joseph took Mary to be his wife because he was obedient to the commands of God.

We have another example of obedience in today’s Old Testament reading:

Again the Lord spoke to Ahaz, saying, Ask a sign of the Lord your God; let it be deep as Sheol or high as heaven. But Ahaz said, I will not ask, and I will not put the Lord to the test. Then Isaiah said: “Hear then, O house of David! Is it too little for you to weary mortals, that you weary my God also? Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Look, the young woman is with child and shall bear a son, and shall name him Immanuel.   (Isaiah 7:10-14)

King Ahaz was requested to do a very simple thing. All he had to do was to ask for a sign from God. Ahaz was disobedient. He refused to do so. Why was he so unwilling? Perhaps he was too busy with his own plans to take the time to listen to the plan of God. Of course, He hid whatever reason he had to refuse to do what God asked in a lame attempt to sound pious.

God had a plan for Israel. Ahaz could have been a part of that plan. God asked Ahaz to participate in a plan that would restore all of humankind to a lasting relationship with God. What a great honor that would have been for Ahaz, or anyone.

Ahaz refused God, but that did not stop God’s plan. His vision is far greater than anyone else’s vision. No human being can stop God from carrying out his plan. He will move on and work with those who are obedient to his word. The blessings that God bestows on those who are obedient will be lost by those who refuse God.

The Apostle Paul warned against disobedience:

Do you not realize that God’s kindness is meant to lead you to repentance? But by your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath, when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed. For he will repay according to each one’s deeds: to those who by patiently doing good seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life; while for those who are self-seeking and who obey not the truth but wickedness, there will be wrath and fury. There will be anguish and distress for everyone who does evil, the Jew first and also the Greek, but glory and honor and peace for everyone who does good, the Jew first and also the Greek.   (Romans 2:5-10)

Ahaz, the disobedient one,  had a disastrous reign and died at an early age. His son, Hezekiah, whom Ahaz attempted to sacrifice to the demon god Moloch, succeeded him. Fortunately Hezekiah was spared. He commissioned the priests and Levites to open and repair the doors of the Temple and to remove the defilements of the sanctuary, a task which took 16 days.

Joseph, on the other hand, was obedient. He was given the honor of being the earthly father of Jesus. What greater honor could he have been given.

God has a plan for each of us. That plan is part of a greater plan that God has. If we obey him we will not only be blessed, but we will have the honor a blessing many others.

We read in the Book of Hebrews:

In the days of his flesh, Jesus offered up prayers and supplications, with loud cries and tears, to the one who was able to save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverent submission. Although he was a Son, he learned obedience through what he suffered; and having been made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him.   (Hebrews 5:7-9)

Jesus obeyed the Father, endured the cross, and bestowed upon us the greatest blessing of all. How can we refuse the one who made such a great sacrifice on our behalf? Are we to nullify the power of the Gospel through our disobedience? No, our primary act of obedience is the believe in the resurrection and proclaim this message to others. In this way we bless so many others, but we also bless ourselves.

From Revelation:

Then I heard a loud voice in heaven. It said,

“Now the salvation and the power and the kingdom of our God have come.
    The authority of his Messiah has come.
Satan, who brings charges against our brothers and sisters,
    has been thrown down.
    He brings charges against them in front of our God day and night.
They had victory over him
    by the blood the Lamb spilled for them.
They had victory over him
    by speaking the truth about Jesus to others.   (Revelation 12:10-12)

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