Tag Archives: righteousness

First Sunday after Christmas

The Word Became Flesh

The Gospel of John does not have an Infancy narrative as do the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. Rather, John speaks of a time before the birth of the Christ Child. He writes of the One who pre-existed the world and was the very agent of all creation:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

Many of His own Jewish people did not comprehend who Jesus was when they were privileged to see him in person:

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him.  (John 1:10-11)

Though the Gospel of John does not speak of an infancy narrative. It does speak of our infancy narrative:

But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.   (John 1:12-13)

We are reborn as children of God in Jesus. The Apostle Paul writes:

But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God.   (Galatians 4:4-7)

The remarkable thing is that the creator God entered the world of His own creation on our behalf. In Jesus, God made himself vulnerable to humankind, in order to reveal his true nature and heart:

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:14)

Jesus is the word made flesh. He is Emmanuel, God with us. He loves us and is for us. Are we with him today?

The Prophet Isaiah wrote:

I will greatly rejoice in the Lord,
my whole being shall exult in my God;
for he has clothed me with the garments of salvation,
he has covered me with the robe of righteousness,
as a bridegroom decks himself with a garland,
and as a bride adorns herself with her jewels.
For as the earth brings forth its shoots,
and as a garden causes what is sown in it to spring up,
so the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise
to spring up before all the nations.  (Isaiah 61:10-11)

God is counting on our testimony. We are to be living examples as children of the Almighty. Our infancy narratives are vital to the whole world.

 

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Third Sunday of Advent

He Came to Testify to the Light

John the Baptist seemed to spring up out of nowhere. The religious leaders in Jerusalem were not prepared from him. Reading from today’s Gospel of John:

This is the testimony given by John when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, “Who are you?” He confessed and did not deny it, but confessed, “I am not the Messiah.” And they asked him, “What then? Are you Elijah?” He said, “I am not.” “Are you the prophet?” He answered, “No.” Then they said to him, “Who are you? Let us have an answer for those who sent us. What do you say about yourself?” He said, “I am the voice of one crying out in the wilderness, ‘Make straight the way of the Lord,’” as the prophet Isaiah said.   (John 1:19-23)

The Pharisees wanted to know why John was baptizing Jews. Baptism was required for Gentiles who were converting to Judaism. Jews were the rightful children of Abraham. They were the people of the Covenant. For the Pharisees the ministry of John the Baptist seemed irrelevant. Why was the ministry of John the Baptist needed? Again, reading from John’s Gospel:

Now they had been sent from the Pharisees. They asked him, “Why then are you baptizing if you are neither the Messiah, nor Elijah, nor the prophet?” John answered them, “I baptize with water. Among you stands one whom you do not know, the one who is coming after me; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandal.”   (John 1:24-27)

John the Baptist’s ministry was preliminary. His purpose was to testify to the light of Christ that was coming into the world. From John’s Gospel:

He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light.   ()

John the Baptist’s was twofold: He came to reveal the darkness and then to point to the One who would dispel the darkness and illuminate the world. But before the people were able to see the light, they would first have to see the darkness.

Today, are we not surrounded by darkness? The darkness seems to be advancing, not retreating. Chaos has been planned by the Prince of Darkness. What must we do? Do we look for a leader that will lead us out of all this? God does lead through his anointed ones. King David was a good example. But even David fell for short of the glory of God. He was a man after God’s own heart. But he was also an adulterer and murderer. John the Baptist was a leader sent from God, but he could not deliver the people out of darkness on his own. He pointed to Jesus.

Unfortunately, we have false prophets and false teachers in our churches today who are not pointing to Jesus. In fact, many of them are not addressing the darkness in their sermons. We have self-help, happy sermons. Before we can understand, appreciate, and fully embrace the light of Christ, we must see clearly the darkness. We must see the darkness that is within ourselves.

The Apostle Paul gives us a prescription:

Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. Do not quench the Spirit. Do not despise the words of prophets, but test everything; hold fast to what is good; abstain from every form of evil.   (1 Thessalonians 5:16-22)

Rather than despair, we must seek the truth of God’s Word. We must seek the Word made flesh. All true prophecy points to Jesus. We must shut out the falsehood of this world. We have false prophets and we have false journalists. Everyone who does not give glory to the Lord is not of him.

Mary, the mother of Jesus proclaimed:

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,

my spirit rejoices in God my Savior;
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.   (Luke 1:46-53)

Jesus is our savior. Do we fear him? Have we humbled ourselves before hm? Do we hunger and thirst for his righteousness?c

The Apostle Paul blessed the Church of Thessaloniki:

May the God of peace himself sanctify you entirely; and may your spirit and soul and body be kept sound and blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. The one who calls you is faithful, and he will do this.   (1 Thessalonians 5:23-24)

Advent is a season of not only preparing for the coming of the Christ child, it is also a time of preparation for the return of the Lion of Judah. The Lamb of God who was slain for us to take away our sins, is the sovereign ruler of the age to come. Does he rule our hearts today? Are we allowing his light to deliver us from darkness? Let us take our eyes off of this fallen world for a moment and reflect upon the light of Christ that is coming into the world today. Many people are opening their eyes and hearts to One who is the true light of this world.

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Thursday in Easter Wee5

The Resurrection of the Body 

The bodily resurrection of Jesus is debated by certain biblical scholars and theologians. Today’s reading from the Gospel of Luke leaves little doubt, however:

While the disciples were talking about how they had seen Jesus risen from the dead, Jesus himself stood among them and said to them, “Peace be with you.” They were startled and terrified, and thought that they were seeing a ghost. He said to them, “Why are you frightened, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? Look at my hands and my feet; see that it is I myself. Touch me and see; for a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have.” And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. While in their joy they were disbelieving and still wondering, he said to them, “Have you anything here to eat?” They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate in their presence.  (Luke 24:36-42)

Christianity is not Eastern mysticism. It is not about the destruction of the self. It is not about being entrapped in a human form and trying to escape. Christianity is about the resurrection of the body and the soul. Jesus was raised up bodily. We will also be raised in bodily form along with Him, provided that we believe in Him. The Apostle Paul writes:

Now if Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. And if the Spirit of Him who raised Jesus from the dead lives in you, then He who raised Christ from the dead will also bring your mortal bodies to life through His Spirit who lives in you. (Romans 8:10-12)

Is His Spirit living in us? If we do not have the Holy Spirit then we do not have eternal life with God. The Spirit is Holy. We must live Holy. Without holiness no one will see God. We must lead righteous lives. Righteousness is not optional, even for Christian believers. Christian belief makes righteousness possible. The psalmist writes:

Open to me the gates of righteousness,
    that I may enter through them
    and give thanks to the Lord.

This is the gate of the Lord;
    the righteous shall enter through it.   (Psalm 118:19-20)

By His death and resurrection Jesus has open for us the gates of righteousness. We must walk through it and remain on the path. The Spirit will lead us into all truth, but we must follow the Spirit. Are we listening to that still, small voice dwelling within us?

We can be comforted to know that life does go on after death. We will have a body and we will be recognizable just as the risen Lord was to his disciples. We will eat and enjoy food. What will be different? We will be living in the everlasting presence and glory of God.

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Tuesday in Holy Week

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Children of the Light

Holy Week reminds us of the contrast between darkness and light. Darkness was all around Jesus but He continued to radiate the love of God. The message that He wanted to convey to His disciples was that they should choose the light over darkness:

Then Jesus told them, “You are going to have the light just a little while longer. Walk while you have the light, before darkness overtakes you. Whoever walks in the dark does not know where they are going. Believe in the light while you have the light, so that you may become children of light.”  (John 12:35-36)

We have been called  by Jesus to walk as children of the light. Young children are often open and trusting, particularly if they are raised in a loving environment. When we get older we become more aware of our shortcomings and we want to hide them. We don’t want others to see through us because we know that we are not altogether pure. The Pharisees made it a practice of diverting the gaze of others from them by compounding rules that others would not be able to keep. They created darkness to obscure that fact that they were not walking in the light themselves.

While we have Jesus we should walk in Him. He extends His hand to us but we must grasp it. Though He warned the Pharisees they would not listen. There might be a time when we do not have Jesus. All anyone can attempt to do without Him is a coverup. Yet darkness is only a temporary solution. Ultimately, it is no solution at all. Why should we depend upon deception when we can depend upon God?

Consider your own call, brothers and sisters: not many of you were wise by human standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong; God chose what is low and despised in the world, things that are not, to reduce to nothing things that are, so that no one might boast in the presence of God. He is the source of your life in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification and redemption, in order that, as it is written, “Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord.”  (1 Corinthians 1:26-31)

Notice the order in which God works in us: Wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification and redemption. These are steps through which God takes us as we respond to him.

God’s light does not come through our good deeds. Our light is a gift and a promise which God made through the Prophet Isaiah:

“It is too light a thing that you should be my servant
to raise up the tribes of Jacob
and to restore the survivors of Israel;
I will give you as a light to the nations,
that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.”   (Isaiah 49:6)

Jesus is the light of the world. He is our salvation. Are we open to Him as a little child would be, or are we hiding in the darkness of our own making? Let our prayer be the one of today’s psalms:

In you, O Lord, I take refuge;
    let me never be put to shame.
In your righteousness deliver me and rescue me;
    incline your ear to me and save me.   (Psalm 71:1-2)

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