Tag Archives: resurrection

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 19A

Track 1: The Lord Has Become My Salvation

Exodus 14:19-31
Psalm 114
or
Exodus 15:1b-11,20-21
Romans 14:1-12
Matthew 18:21-35

Before the grumbling in the wilderness, there was a special time for Israel when they celebrated their victory over the Egyptians by the mighty hand of God. In Exodus we read:

I will sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously;
horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.

The Lord is my strength and my might,
and he has become my salvation;

this is my God, and I will praise him,
my father’s God, and I will exalt him.   (Exodus 15:1-2)

Do we now remember the victories of the Lord in our Lives, or are we grumbling in the wilderness of sin? Life can deal some tough blows that is for sure. We can always find excuses to grumble. What about the victories? The Apostle Paul wrote that the circumstances in life count for little when compared to the glory of the resurrection. The greatest victory that we experience in our lives is that we belong to God:

We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves. If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s. For to this end Christ died and lived again, so that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.   (Romans 14:7-9)

When we lose focus of the great triumph of the cross we tend to go back to grumbling and to judging others. Paul continued:

Why do you pass judgment on your brother or sister? Or you, why do you despise your brother or sister? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God. For it is written,

“As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me,
and every tongue shall give praise to God.”

So then, each of us will be accountable to God.   (Romans 14:10-12)

The disciple Peter wanted to know how many times he had to forgive someone, as if we should keep score:

Peter came and said to Jesus, “Lord, if another member of the church sins against me, how often should I forgive? As many as seven times?” Jesus said to him, “Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven times.

The kingdom of God is not about keeping score on others. It is not about grumbling about the conditions in our lives. It is about living for God under all circumstances. This life is temporal and will soon come to an end. Now is the time to be ever more vigilant to ready ourselves to stand before the Lord. He is coming soon. Tanks be to God. In the meantime we will walk in love with a forgiving heart.

 

 

Track 2: Bad Things Turned into Good

Genesis 50:15-21
Psalm 103:(1-7), 8-13
Romans 14:1-12
Matthew 18:21-35

There was a celebrated book written by a Jewish rabbi entitle “Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People.” The book had merit, but according to Jesus the promise was wrong. When someone called him “Good Master” he asked that person why he called him “good.” Jesus said that no one was good but the “Father” alone. (Mark 10:18)

The classic Old Testament case of bad things happening to someone who seemingly did not deserve all that happened to him was Joseph. His brothers sold him into slavery in Egypt. He was put in prison there under false accusations. We pick up on the story in today’s Old Testament reading. It was a time of great famine and only Egypt was prepared for it. God had revealed the its coming to Joseph. Joseph is now second in charge of all Egypt. All stored up food supply are under his authority.

Joseph’s brothers now have to go before him to ask for mercy and assistance in a time of great crisis. Their concern is that Joseph may exact revenge upon them. As we read from Exodus notice that the brothers now want to identify with the God of their father:

Realizing that their father was dead, Joseph’s brothers said, “What if Joseph still bears a grudge against us and pays us back in full for all the wrong that we did to him?” So they approached Joseph, saying, “Your father gave this instruction before he died, ‘Say to Joseph: I beg you, forgive the crime of your brothers and the wrong they did in harming you.’ Now therefore please forgive the crime of the servants of the God of your father.”

Joseph’s reply was unexpected:

Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today. So have no fear; I myself will provide for you and your little ones.” In this way he reassured them, speaking kindly to them.   (Genesis 50:20-21)

What empowered Joseph to be so forgiving and so generous? He looked at things from God’s perspective and not a human perspective. What was intoned for evil God used for good. This can happen when we put our trust in the Lord and not try to take matters in our own hands.

All of us need the wisdom of Joseph. Two key elements were essential in Joseph’s life: trust in God and forgiveness of those who wronged him. Without trust it is hard to forgive. With trust we can more easily forgive.

Peter realized that forgiveness was important but wanted to know the limit of forgiveness. He asked Jesus how many times he should forgive someone as if we are allowed to keep score. Before we become too hard on Peter we must search our own hearts. Jesus famous reply to Peter who wanted to know if we should forgive someone seven times:

“Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven times.   (Matthew 18:22)

Today’s psalm is the prayer of someone who seeks God’s perspective:

Bless the Lord, O my soul,
and all that is within me, bless his holy Name.

Bless the Lord, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

He forgives all your sins
and heals all your infirmities;

He redeems your life from the grave
and crowns you with mercy and loving-kindness;

He satisfies you with good things,
and your youth is renewed like an eagle’s.

Let this psalm be our prayer. It helps us to remember the goodness of God in all circumstances. As we recite that goodness we remind ourselves that God can bring good out of bad situations. After all, God has redeemed our lives from the grave and crowned us with mercy and loving-kindness.

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Seventh Sunday of Easter, Year A

Why Do You Stand Here Looking Up?

The last words of Jesus spoken to his disciples before being taken up to heaven are extremely significant. In John we read:

When the apostles had come together, they asked Jesus, “Lord, is this the time when you will restore the kingdom to Israel?” He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or periods that the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” When he had said this, as they were watching, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight. While he was going and they were gazing up toward heaven, suddenly two men in white robes stood by them. They said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up toward heaven? This Jesus, who has been taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.”   (Acts 1:6-11)

What is significant? Is it that Jesus said that we would be his witnesses. Yes! And the assurance from the angels that Jesus would return the same way he left. Yes! But the angels also said this: “Why do you stand here looking up?”

So many events and signs today point to the fact that we are living in the last days. It is right that we should be anticipating Jesus’s return. Even the Early Church did that. But they did much more than that. Because of their courageous witness the Gospel was spread throughout the world.

How are we doing today in terms of our witness to the resurrection of Jesus Christ? Are we telling others about the good news of salvation by faith in his saving act upon the cross? Or are re we just looking up and waiting? Do we have a bunker mentality or are we ready to take new ground for the Kingdom of God?

Our example is the Lord Jesus Christ. He lived through very difficult times. Yet his primary concern was to reveal the love of God the Father, whatever the cost. In John we read:

”I have made your name known to those whom you gave me from the world. They were yours, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. Now they know that everything you have given me is from you; for the words that you gave to me I have given to them, and they have received them and know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me.   (John 17:6-8)

The Early Church followed the example of our Lord. They were willing to go the distance, even to the point of death. The Greek word for witness in today’s reading from Acts is “Martus.” From this Greek word we get the word “martyr.” The dictionary defines the word martyr as a person who sacrifices something of great value and especially life itself for the sake of principle.

Jesus gave his life for us. Many of the early believers gave their life for us as well. What are we willing to give today?

Are we waiting on God? Are we waiting on His return? He is waiting on us. He is counting on our witness to the Gospel. Has the Gospel impacted our lives? If so, others should that it has.

What keeps many of us from witnessing today is the threat of persecution. This is increasing more and more throughout the world. Now we are experiencing it in America. Such persecution is promise. The Apostle Peter wrote:

Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal that is taking place among you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when his glory is revealed. If you are reviled for the name of Christ, you are blessed, because the spirit of glory, which is the Spirit of God, is resting on you.   (1 Peter 4:12-14)

The key is that God is with us. We are not alone. God is pouring out this glory through us when we boldly step out for him

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Ascension Day, Year A

You Shall Receive Power

From today’s scriptural readings it is also impossible not to miss this message: You shall receive power. From Acts we read:

So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, is this the time when you will restore the kingdom to Israel?” He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or periods that the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” When he had said this, as they were watching, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight.  (Acts 1:6-10)

In Luke we read the final words of Jesus to his disciples:

Jesus said to his disciples, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you– that everything written about me in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms must be fulfilled.” Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures, and he said to them, “Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. And see, I am sending upon you what my Father promised; so stay here in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”  (Luke 24:44-49)

Are we clothed with power from on high? If not, how can we be effective witnesses for Christ? The Apostle Paul prayed for the Church in Ephesus:

I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints, and for this reason I do not cease to give thanks for you as I remember you in my prayers. I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power.  (Ephesians 1:15-19)

Paul speaks about  “the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe.” Are we believers? Then Paul is speaking to us!

The Church is the Body of Christ on the earth until Jesus comes again. But we are not powerless. In fact, Jesus said that we would continue the work he was doing and do even greater work. However, this work can be accomplished only through the Holy Spirit for those who believe in Jesus and the promise he made to the Church.

The primary work of the church is evangelism. The power of God is a large part of effective evangelism. Paul wrote the church in Thessalonica:

For we know, brothers and sisters beloved by God, that he has chosen you, because our message of the gospel came to you not in word only, but also in power and in the Holy Spirit and with full conviction; just as you know what kind of persons we proved to be among you for your sake.   (1 Thessalonians 1:4-5)

What are we accomplishing in his name? Are we powerless? If we do not believe in his promise, then we are without his power. The enemy wants to keep us in the dark.

A revival in the Church is coming for those who believe and pray. Do we want to sit around and curse the darkness? Or do we want to fulfill the promise made to the Body of Christ by our Lord Jesus. It is up to us. Jesus has poured out his power. We must receive it by faith.

Grant, we pray, Almighty God, that as we believe your only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ to have ascended into heaven, so we may also in heart and mind there ascend, and with him continually dwell; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

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