Tag Archives: resurrection

Ascension Day

Clothed with Power from On High

There is much speculation in today’s Church concerning the date of Jesus’s return to the earth. Little has changed from the Early Church. This same concern was on the mind and hearts of the early disciples. From Acts we read:

So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, is this the time when you will restore the kingdom to Israel?” He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or periods that the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”   (Acts 1:6-8)

Jesus did not answer his disciples directly. Rather, he told them that there was a more important consideration for his Church. They were to be witnesses to his resurrection. From Luke we read:

“Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. And see, I am sending upon you what my Father promised; so stay here in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”   (Luke 24:46-49)

There would be two essential ingredients to witnessing for Christ: 1) they were to proclaim the repentance and forgiveness of sins, and 2) that they would be clothed with power from on high. That does not sound like a seeker church with a watered down Gospel. Our church is not to blend into the world and thus, have little relevance. We need to be clothed with the Holy Spirit in order to fulfill our calling. The age of the apostolic faith is not over. We are now the apostles.

Are we excited about the message that has been entrusted to us? The psalmist wrote:

God has gone up with a shout,
the Lord with the sound of the ram’s-horn.

Sing praises to God, sing praises;
sing praises to our King, sing praises.

For God is King of all the earth;
sing praises with all your skill.

God reigns over the nations;
God sits upon his holy throne.   (Psalm 47:5-8)

Are we equipped for ministry? If not, let us ask for power from on high. Jesus promises to baptize us in the Holy Spirit. He has called us to do his greater works. Now is not the time to shrink back or hide behind man-made doctrine or tradition.

The questions the angels asked the disciples on the day of ascension is still applicable to us:

“Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up toward heaven? This Jesus, who has been taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.”   (Acts 1:11)

We do not have time to waste. Let us get on with the true task of the Church. Jesus may come at any moment. We should be living holy lives with our lamps full all the time. But our concern must be for the lost. We were once lost and someone witnessed to us. If we love Jesus then we will obey him.

His great commission is all the more important today as we approach the close of the Church age. Jesus speaks to us today:

You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”   (Acts 1:8)

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Third Sunday of Easter

Were Not Our Hearts Burning within Us? 

As two travelers were walking on the road to Emmaus they were talking about the recent events in Jerusalem. A third man joined them on the way and asked them what they were disussing:

He asked them, “What things?” They replied, “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place. Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.”

Then he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures.  (Luke 24:13-27)

We live in a confusing time. We hear and read conflicting information. Even the “expert” analysis often makes little sense. Who are we to believe? Where are we to turn for help in understanding our complex world and its challenging circumstances?

The two travelers walking to Emmaus needed help. They were hearing numerous reports but unsure about what to believe. What they needed was a reliable report with expert interpretation. What they received while on the road was the Word of God interpreted by the Word of God made flesh. Jesus became their guide along the way. Things were starting to make sense for them. They became excited about what they were hearing and beginning to understand.

Today we need Jesus more than ever. We need his words, his wisdom, and his direction for our lives.

Jesus wants to share with us a deeper meaning of his death and resurrection. We need to be attentive to what he is saying. The travelers on the road were eager to hear even more of Jesus:

As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.” So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?”   (Luke 24:28-33)

Jesus imparts wisdom and understanding through his word. He imparts healing and strength through his body and blood which he shares with us during Holy Communion. Do we hunger and thirst for all that he has for us? Are our hearts burning within us as we listen attentively to his word?

We are on the road of life. Our final destination will be determined by how much we receive from our Lord. He is the way, the truth, and the life. He is the gate. He is the door. No one comes to the Father except through him.

The ruler of this age, the enemy of our souls, will do everything he can to distract us and confuse us. His goal is to drown out the Word of God. It is time that we wake up. He controls the media, the entertainment industry, and even some of our churches. What he offers has little value. In fact, it is designed to sap our energy, kill us before our time, and even steal our inheritance in Christ. There is a far better alternative. In the words of the Apostle:

You know that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your ancestors, not with perishable things like silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, like that of a lamb without defect or blemish. He was destined before the foundation of the world, but was revealed at the end of the ages for your sake. Through him you have come to trust in God, who raised him from the dead and gave him glory, so that your faith and hope are set on God.   (1 Peter 1:18-23)

Jesus poured his all for us. In him we have all that we need. The sojourners on the road to Emmaus were blessed to hear from the Lord Jesus himself. But Jesus is still speaking today. He is risen. He is the world made flesh. He is Emmanuel, God with us. Should we not invite him to walk along with us so that we might hear the words of life?

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Second Sunday of Easter

The Covenant of Reconciliation:

The Apostle Thomas is remembered as “Doubting Thomas.” That may be a little unfair. To be sure, he was a skeptic concerning the resurrection of Jesus:

Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with the other disciples when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”   (John 20:24-25)

On the other hand, Thomas had been faithful as a disciple. He was willing to sacrifice for what he believed was the cause of Christ. When Jesus spoke about going to Jerusalem, which proved to be his last trip there, Thomas was aware of the danger involved:

Then Thomas said to the rest of the disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”   (John 11:16)

To be sure, Thomas was missing something. First, he missed being there when Jesus appeared to his disciples. He was also missing out on a new status which God had decreed from him, at   status made possible by the death and resurrection of his Son. Thomas was missing the new birth about which Peter would soon preach:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! By his great mercy he has given us a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, who are being protected by the power of God through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, even if now for a little while you have had to suffer various trials, so that the genuineness of your faith — being more precious than gold that, though perishable, is tested by fire– may be found to result in praise and glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.  (1 Peter 1:3-7)

From a worldly point of view, Thomas was a good man. Jesus said the greatest man was John the baptist:

Truly I tell you, among those born of women no one has arisen greater than John the Baptist; yet the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.   (Matthew 11:11)

Who could be greater than John the baptist? That could be you or me. John had not yet received the new birth because Jesus had not yet risen from the dead. But we have been born after the resurrection. We have an opportunity to enter into the kingdom of God. How do we do that? Let us see how Thomas did that:

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”   (John 20:26-31)

Having seen Jesus now after his resurrection, Thomas makes his affirmation of faith. That same affirmation is open to us. The Apostle Peter writes:

Although you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy, for you are receiving the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.   (1 Peter 1:8-9)

Believing in the resurrection is the gateway to the new birth. The Apostle Paul writes:

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ and gave us the ministry of reconciliation: that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them. And he has committed to us the message of reconciliation. We are therefore Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us. We implore you on Christ’s behalf: Be reconciled to God. God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.   (2 Corinthians 5:17-21 NIV)

Before the resurrection the people of God were temporarily forgiven through their confession of sin and the making of sacrifices. But they were never reconciled to God. They did not have peace with God. They were still estranged from him.

Now our sins have been forgiven though the cross and resurrection. Jesus has paid the price for our sins once and for all. We are given a new status. We have the opportunity of living in an eternal relationship with God. Is Jesus our Lord and our God? That is what Thomas said after he believed. The Apostle Paul writes:

If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.   (Romans 10:9-10)

Almighty and everlasting God, who in the Paschal mystery established the new covenant of reconciliation: Grant that all who have been reborn into the fellowship of Christ’s Body may show forth in their lives what they profess by their faith; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

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Saturday in Easter Week

192Witnesses to the Resurrection

The disciples who had heard the testimony of the women concerning the resurrection of Jesus, did not believe them. Unbelief is one of our greatest sins. It keeps us from receiving word from God. And it also prevents us from boldly testifying to the resurrection of our Lord. We worry about appearing out of the norm. The resurrection of the dead is radical and we need to become comfortable with it.

Jesus has called us out of our comfort. He  wants to assign us with a radical mission:

Later he appeared to the eleven themselves as they were sitting at the table; and he upbraided them for their lack of faith and stubbornness, because they had not believed those who saw him after he had risen. And he said to them, “Go into all the world and proclaim the good news to the whole creation.   (Mark 16:14-15)

The Apostles Peter and John, when they discovered the truth of the resurrection, became very bold in their faith. Without their witness the Church would never have survived or grown. So vital is the witness of the Christian believer that Satan will do all in his power to thwart it. We see this in today’s reading from Acts:

When the rulers and elders and scribes saw the boldness of Peter and John and realized that they were uneducated and ordinary men, they were amazed and recognized them as companions of Jesus. When they saw the man who had been cured standing beside them, they had nothing to say in opposition. So they ordered them to leave the council while they discussed the matter with one another. They said, “What will we do with them? For it is obvious to all who live in Jerusalem that a notable sign has been done through them; we cannot deny it. But to keep it from spreading further among the people, let us warn them to speak no more to anyone in this name.” So they called them and ordered them not to speak or teach at all in the name of Jesus. But Peter and John answered them, “Whether it is right in God’s sight to listen to you rather than to God, you must judge; for we cannot keep from speaking about what we have seen and heard.” After threatening them again, they let them go, finding no way to punish them because of the people, for all of them praised God for what had happened.   (Acts 4:13-21)

Today, are we believers in the resurrection of our Lord? Are we bold in our testimony? If we are then we soon discover how much the enemy comes against us. Now in America, Christians are beginning to experience persecution that only existed in others parts of the world. As times goes on the persecution will become more intense. What will be our response? Will we still be able to speak of Jesus with Joy? The psalmist wrote:

Open for me the gates where the godly can go in.
    I will enter and give thanks to the Lord.
This is the gate of the Lord.
    Only those who do what is right can go through it.
Lord, I will give thanks to you, because you answered me.
    You have saved me.

The stone the builders didn’t accept
    has become the most important stone of all.
The Lord has done it.
    It is wonderful in our eyes.
The Lord has done it on this day.
    Let us be joyful today and be glad.   (Psalm 118:19-24)

We find ourselves strengthen in our faith when we do express it to others. Not only that, but we encourage others in their faith as well. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Finally, brothers and sisters, rejoice! Strive for full restoration, encourage one another, be of one mind, live in peace. And the God of love and peace will be with you.   (2 Corinthians 13;11)

He died for us so that, whether we are awake or asleep, we may live together with him. Therefore encourage one another and build each other up, just as in fact you are doing.   (1 Thessalonians 5:10-11)

 

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