Tag Archives: prayer

Friday in the Fourth Week of Lent

The Tests of Life

When we strive to live righteous lives we will certainly be tested. Satan, the ruler of this present age, has his minions in place to test us:

Let us test him with insult and torture,
so that we may find out how gentle he is,
and make trial of his forbearance.
Let us condemn him to a shameful death,
for, according to what he says, he will be protected.”

Thus they reasoned, but they were led astray,
for their wickedness blinded them,
and they did not know the secret purposes of God,
nor hoped for the wages of holiness,
nor discerned the prize for blameless souls;
for God created us for incorruption,
and made us in the image of his own eternity,
but through the devil’s envy death entered the world,
and those who belong to his company experience it.   (Wisdom 2:19–24)

Some seek God’s ways and some seek to test his ways. Testing is a sign of unbelief. We are using our rational mind to figure God out. That is what many were doing in Jerusalem when Jesus entered the city for the Festival of Booths:

Now some of the people of Jerusalem were saying, “Is not this the man whom they are trying to kill? And here he is, speaking openly, but they say nothing to him! Can it be that the authorities really know that this is the Messiah? Yet we know where this man is from; but when the Messiah comes, no one will know where he is from.”   (John 7:25–27)

When do we get beyond testing? When we value righteousness more than knowledge. The psalmist wrote:

Evil shall slay the wicked,
and those who hate the righteous will be punished.

The Lord ransoms the life of his servants,
and none will be punished who trust in him.   (Psalm 34:21-22)

Our hope is to trust in the Lord Jesus Christ and not in our rationalizations. Only Jesus can enable us to live righteous and holy lives. In fact, he is our righteousness. We do not have to pass Satan’s tests. The only test in life is: “Do we believe in the Lord Jesus Christ?”

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Thursday in the First Week of Lent

He Cares for the Lowly

Jesus makes it clear that, as God’s children, we have every right to call upon the Father:

Jesus said, “Ask, and it will be given you; search, and you will find; knock, and the door will be opened for you. For everyone who asks receives, and everyone who searches finds, and for everyone who knocks, the door will be opened.   (Matthew 7:7–8)

How we approach God has very much to do with how He will respond to us.

Esther had spent her life among the Jewish exiles in Persia, where she lived under the protection of her cousin Mordecai. She became Queen to King Ahasuerus, who did not realize that she was a Jew. The wicked Haman planned to kill Mordecai and exterminate all Jews from the kingdom. Ester found out about this plot.

Though Esther was a queen, she humbled herself before the Lord. She fasted and prayed for her people. She understood that, though she was powerless to stop Haman, God could help her.  God is not powerless

The psalmist wrote:

All the kings of the earth will praise you, O LORD,
when they have heard the words of your mouth.

They will sing of the ways of the LORD,
that great is the glory of the LORD.

Though the LORD be high, he cares for the lowly;
he perceives the haughty from afar.   (Psalm 138:5-7)

God is the high and exalted One. The good news is that we are able to call upon him in times of trouble:

For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.   (Isaiah 57:15)

God gave Esther a plan to thwart Haman. He ended up being hung on the gallows which he had prepared for the Jewish people.

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Wednesday in the First Week of Lent

The Sign of Jonah

Jesus told us to look for the signs in the heavens. There are significant signs which tell us the season in which we live, both climatically and spiritually. Spiritual signs are given for unbelievers and not believers. These spiritual signs do not guarantee belief. There is really only one sign that is important:

When the crowds were increasing, Jesus began to say, “This generation is an evil generation; it asks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of Jonah.   (Luke 11:29)

What is this sign of Jonah? It has to do with our repentance and the mercy of God.

When God saw what they did, how they turned from their evil ways, God changed his mind about the calamity that he had said he would bring upon them; and he did not do it.   (Jonah 3:10)

Nineveh was a wicked city destined for God’s judgement and destruction. Nonetheless, by the power of God’s message through the prophet Jonah, both the leadership and the people repented and escaped what God was ready to pour out on them.

We have a sign from God that is so much greater than Jonah:

For just as Jonah became a sign to the people of Nineveh, so the Son of Man will be to this generation.   (Luke 11:30)

Our sign is none other than the resurrection Lord Jesus Christ. How do we respond to it. Let us take a look at the conditions in which we live. We see the sin of Nineveh all around us. Are we not responsible in many ways?

God tells us:

If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, pray, seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land.   (2 Chronicles 7:14)

We need a revival. We need a reformation in our churches. We need an awakening and we are starting to see the beginnings of one. Let us pray for our nation, the Church, and ourselves.

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Tuesday in the First Week of Lent

Effective Prayer

Jesus cautioned us not to pray like the heathens:

Jesus said, “When you are praying, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him.   (Matthew 6:7–8)

Do we often order God around in our prayers as if He needs our explanations and directions? Rather, should we not use God’s word in place of our words? His word accomplishes great things:

For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven,
and do not return there until they have watered the earth,

making it bring forth and sprout,
giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater,

so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth;
it shall not return to me empty,

but it shall accomplish that which I purpose,
and succeed in the thing for which I sent it.   (Isaiah 55:10–11)

Should we not ask the Holy Spirit to direct our prayers? In that way our purpose becomes God’s purpose. Our prayers will be in agreement with the prayers of our Lord Jesus, who intercedes for us at the right hand of God:

Likewise the Spirit helps us in our weakness; for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but that very Spirit intercedes with sighs too deep for words.   (Romans 8:26)

In order to pray with discernment, however, our hearts must be prepared for prayer. We cannot pray effectively if we have unforgiveness in our hearts. Jesus has given us a guideline for prayer. In any prayer, we must begin with a humble and forgiving heart. Jesus said:

For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you; but if you do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.   (Matthew 6:14-15)

Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective..   (James 5:16)

We must humble ourselves before God with repentant hearts, rather then approaching him with a haughty spirit. If so, we have access to the very throne of grace, because Jesus has paid the price for our sins. It is not that we have to get behind the veil. The veil was torn apart the moment Jesus dies on the cross.

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