Tag Archives: peace

Seventh Sunday of Easter, Year C

The Power of Prayer and Praise

Today’s reading from the Book of Acts offers a great illustration of the power of prayer and praise. Paul and Silas had been called to go to Philippi. There they encountered a demon possessed woman who told fortunes. When God delivered her through their ministry trouble ensued. The magistrates beat them, put them in the innermost cell and fastened their feet in the stocks. Reading from Acts:

About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them. Suddenly there was an earthquake, so violent that the foundations of the prison were shaken; and immediately all the doors were opened and everyone’s chains were unfastened. When the jailer woke up and saw the prison doors wide open, he drew his sword and was about to kill himself, since he supposed that the prisoners had escaped. But Paul shouted in a loud voice, “Do not harm yourself, for we are all here.” The jailer called for lights, and rushing in, he fell down trembling before Paul and Silas. Then he brought them outside and said, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?” They answered, “Believe on the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved, you and your household.” They spoke the word of the Lord[c] to him and to all who were in his house.   (Acts 16:25-32)

Not only were Paul and Silas released from their chains but their jailer received salvation through faith in Jesus. By staying positive and putting their trust in God, they were able to accomplish what God had planned for them to do.

How would we have reacted in this situation? Reactions have consequences – good or bad. Would we follow the perscription of the Apostle Paul?

Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.   (1 Thessalonians 5:16-18)

This is how God desires for us to respond. It may be hard to do under difficult circumstances. But if we are praying without ceasing, if we are conscious of God’s presence with us, then we will be much better prepared for anything.

There is a payoff when we rejoice in God. Paul writes:

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 4:4-7)

We need to be connected to God. When we are connected to God, when we are part of God, we experience his peace. We place ourselves under his protection.

Paul tells us that the Lord is near and not far away. He is always there for us. Our strength is in our fellowship and unity with God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Jesus makes this possible for us. He prayed to the Father for his disciples as well as those who would follow them:

“I ask not only on behalf of these, but also on behalf of those who will believe in me through their word, that they may all be one. As you, Father, are in me and I am in you, may they also be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given them, so that they may be one, as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may become completely one, so that the world may know that you have sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.   (John 17:20-23)

We are not alone. All we need to do is to believe the prayer of Jesus. We need to seek him out under all circumstances. The psalmist tells us:

Enter into His gates with thanksgiving,
And into His courts with praise.
Be thankful to Him, and bless His name.   (Psalm 100:4)

The gateway to God is through our prayer and praise, believing that he will hear us and respond. Again the psalmist writes:

Rejoice in the Lord, you righteous,
and give thanks to his holy Name.   (Psalm 97:12)

In believing and in seeking our quest will be fulfilled. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit will revealed themselves to us.

Jesus concludes his high priestly prayer:

Father, I desire that those also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory, which you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world.

“Righteous Father, the world does not know you, but I know you; and these know that you have sent me. I made your name known to them, and I will make it known, so that the love with which you have loved me may be in them, and I in them.”   (John 17:24-26)

Jesus wants us to be with him so that we may see him in all his glory. We have been talking about gateways. He is the final gateway to the glory of God. From the Book of Revelations we read:

“See, I am coming soon; my reward is with me, to repay according to everyone’s work. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.”

Blessed are those who wash their robes, so that they will have the right to the tree of life and may enter the city by the gates.   (Revelation 22:12-14)

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Seventh Sunday after the Epiphany

Do Not Fret Yourself

We live in an evil world. Sometimes we get overwhelmed. We get frustrated with all the evildoers who seemed to be getting away with their crimes and lies. Perhaps the appointed psalm has a word for us from God:

Do not fret yourself because of evildoers;
do not be jealous of those who do wrong.

For they shall soon wither like the grass,
and like the green grass fade away.

Put your trust in the Lord and do good;
dwell in the land and feed on its riches.

Take delight in the Lord,
and he shall give you your heart’s desire.

Commit your way to the Lord and put your trust in him,
and he will bring it to pass.   (Psalm 37:1-5)

Joseph lived in an evil world. His brothers tried to kill him. They ended up selling him into slavery. Joseph was carried to Egypt and there he experienced many hardships, eventually being cast into prison.

Today, as we pick up the story of Joseph from the Old Testament, we see Joseph in a whole new place. He is now a ruler under Pharaoh of all of Egypt. His brothers who tried to kill him are now standing before him. They are terrified when they discover who Joseph is. But Joseph responds to them in love:

God sent me before you to preserve for you a remnant on earth, and to keep alive for you many survivors. So it was not you who sent me here, but God; he has made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house and ruler over all the land of Egypt. Hurry and go up to my father and say to him, ‘Thus says your son Joseph, God has made me lord of all Egypt; come down to me, do not delay. You shall settle in the land of Goshen, and you shall be near me, you and your children and your children’s children, as well as your flocks, your herds, and all that you have. I will provide for you there—since there are five more years of famine to come—so that you and your household, and all that you have, will not come to poverty.   (Genesis 45:7-11)

How could Joseph forgive his brothers for what they did? It was a matter of seeing things from God’s perspective and not his own. God’s perspective is greater than ours. We read from the Prophet Isaiah:

For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
    nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord.
For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
    so are my ways higher than your ways
    and my thoughts than your thoughts.  (Isaiah 55:8-9)

If we fail to understand what God is doing we will always be frustrated and disappointed. This will lead us into judging others. We will become bitter. The Book of Hebrews offers this advice:

Pursue peace with everyone, and the holiness without which no one will see the Lord. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no root of bitterness springs up and causes trouble, and through it many become defiled. See to it that no one becomes like Esau, an immoral and godless person, who sold his birthright for a single meal.   (Hebrews 12:14-16)

From today’s Gospel reading, Jesus taught:

“Do not judge, and you will not be judged; do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap; for the measure you give will be the measure you get back.”   (Luke 6:37-38)

God is not calling us to be Esau’s. He is calling us to be Joseph’s. Continuing with today’s psalm:

Be still before the Lord
and wait patiently for him.

Do not fret yourself over the one who prospers,
the one who succeeds in evil schemes.

Refrain from anger, leave rage alone;
do not fret yourself; it leads only to evil.

For evildoers shall be cut off,
but those who wait upon the Lord shall possess the land.

In a little while the wicked shall be no more;
you shall search out their place, but they will not be there.

But the lowly shall possess the land;
they will delight in abundance of peace.   (Psalm 37:7-12)

Let us climb down off our high horses and be a part of the lowly who possess the land. God has given us the victory just as he did for Joseph. Our task is to wait patiently on him and place our full trust in his plan for our lives. He speaks to us, from Jeremiah:

For surely I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope.   (Jeremiah 29:11)

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