Tag Archives: patience

Third Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 6

Track 1: Faith and Patience

1 Samuel 15:34-16:13
Psalm 20
2 Corinthians 5:6-10,[11-13],14-17
Mark 4:26-34

God had rejected Saul as king fro his disobedience, yet Saul was still the nominal king. Samuel lamented what had happened to Saul. Often we become stuck in a place of emotions, but God had moved on. Reading from 1 Samuel:

The Lord said to Samuel, “How long will you grieve over Saul? I have rejected him from being king over Israel. Fill your horn with oil and set out; I will send you to Jesse the Bethlehemite, for I have provided for myself a king among his sons.”   (1 Samuel 16:1)

Jesse brought out his sons for Samuel to choose which one would be the new king. Samuel was considering them based on their appearances. But looks can be deceiving:

When they came, he looked on Eliab and thought, “Surely the Lord’s anointed is now before the Lord.” But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for the Lord does not see as mortals see; they look on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.” Then Jesse called Abinadab, and made him pass before Samuel. He said, “Neither has the Lord chosen this one.” Then Jesse made Shammah pass by. And he said, “Neither has the Lord chosen this one.” Jesse made seven of his sons pass before Samuel, and Samuel said to Jesse, “The Lord has not chosen any of these.” Samuel said to Jesse, “Are all your sons here?” And he said, “There remains yet the youngest, but he is keeping the sheep.” And Samuel said to Jesse, “Send and bring him; for we will not sit down until he comes here.” He sent and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and had beautiful eyes, and was handsome. The Lord said, “Rise and anoint him; for this is the one.” Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the presence of his brothers; and the spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward.   (1 Samuel 16:6-13)

It was over forty years before David actually became king. David had to endure many hardships, even threats to his life by Saul. Yet David put his full trust in God and did not lose hope.

God’s ways are not our ways and his timing is not our timing. He is planning and positioning things for our future which we may not aware of for a season. This is often the way God works. From today’s Gospel we read:

Jesus said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”

He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”   (Mark 4:26-32)

What is Jesus saying? He is talking about thye advancement of the kingdom of God on the earth. He was speaking of the kingdom of God advancing in us. This advancement is taken place, much of it hidden at first. When seed is sown it takes some time to germinate. But later the growth is evident. What is our stance when we wait for the growth? Do we ever get so frustrated that we get angry with God for making us wait?

Is our confidence must be in God. He sows the seed, but then he waters it and nurtures it. He knows how to bring it to harvest ad he does for those who trust in him.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

We are always confident; even though we know that while we are at home in the body we are away from the Lord– for we walk by faith, not by sight. Yes, we do have confidence, and we would rather be away from the body and at home with the Lord. So whether we are at home or away, we make it our aim to please him. For all of us must appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each may receive recompense for what has been done in the body, whether good or evil.   (2 Corinthians 5:6-10)

Satin attempts to steal away our confidence in the promises  of God.  Reading from the Book of James:

My brothers and sisters whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance; and let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking in nothing.   (James 1:2-4)

Marten Luther did nt like the Book of James. He said it distracted from the doctrine of faith alone. But we need the wisdom of James in order to understand and apply faith. Our faith in God must be continuous. Paul wrote:

For in hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what is seen? But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience.   (Romans 8:24-25)

Patience and faith are our keys to our growth in the kingdom of God. Today, let us reaffirm our faith before God. Satin will not steal our joy. He will not steal our hope. We are standing on God’s Word. All his promises are yes and Amen. Without patience we may miss out on some of God’s greatest blessings.

 

Track 2: Suggestions

Ezekiel 17:22-24
Psalm 92:1-4,11-14
2 Corinthians 5:6-10,[11-13],14-17
Mark 4:26-34

Looking at the appointed Old Testament Lesson from Ezekiel and Psalm 92 together a theme seems to emerge. Both speak of a planting of the Lord. The nation of Israel is his tender plant. It is planted on a “mountain height” which is Jerusalem.

“All the trees of the field shall know
that I am the Lord.”   (Ezekiel 17:24a)

All the nations of the earth will know the Lord through Israel.

We are also a planting of the Lord. We do not take the place of Israel. Rather, we are in ingrafted branches of Israel. The promises of God for Israel also apply to us.

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The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin

Standing on the Promises of God

Mary, the mother of Jesus, visited her cousin Elizabeth who was also with child. When the child in Elizabeth’s womb hears Mary’s voice he leaps for joy. This child is John the Baptist. This moment of celebration brings joy to Mary and she prophesies:

“My soul magnifies the Lord,
    and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant.
    Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed;
for the Mighty One has done great things for me,
    and holy is his name.
His mercy is for those who fear him
    from generation to generation.
He has shown strength with his arm;
    he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts.
He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
    and lifted up the lowly;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
    and sent the rich away empty.   (Luke 1:47-55)

What is remarkable about Mary and Elizabeth also is that they believed in the promise of God, even though great miracles of God were required. Mary, a virgin, had conceived a child and Elizabeth, who was well beyond any child bearing age, had also conceived. Nevertheless, these chosen instruments of God were able to believe God as did Abraham before them.

Are we able to believe in the miraculous today? Mary and Elizabeth understood that the promises God made to them were not just about them. Jesus and John the Baptist are children of the promise which God made to Abraham. Their births extended and expanded this promise down through the ages. Today, we are recipients of the promise.

God has made promises to us as well. His plans for us may not be as dramatic as that of Mary or Elizabeth, but they are important to God’s plan. Are we willing to believe in those promises and hold on to them. There may be obstacles in the way of our receiving God’s promise. The Apostle Paul tells us how to overcome these obstacles with this prescription:

Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer.   (Romans 12:12)

In time, the promises of God will come to pass. The blessing is in the believing and perseverance. Too often me take matters in our own hands and thwart God’s plans and purposes for us. Others are depending upon us to make the right choices. In fact, their future blessings depend upon our faithfulness. Let us be willing to see beyond ourselves as the wonders of God’s work unfolds.

God will do great things for us but he requires that we exercise our faith. Are we willing to hear, believe, and stand on the promises of God?

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Filed under Eucharist, Feast Day, Gospel, Holy Day, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, The Visitation, Visitation of the Blessed Virgin, Year B