Tag Archives: new creation

The Baptism of Our Lord

Tear Open the Heavens

Today, let us consider successive forms of God’s creation. The  first one is found in Genesis:

In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters. Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light. And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.   (Genesis 1:1-5)

God gave us the sun. He also gave us his light, the glory of his presence. God called the light good. But part of it did not remain good. The sun still shines but his light was diminished due to the fall of humankind. Though humans were made in the image of God, they lost that image. Without God’s presence, the world gradually turned to spiritual darkness. God’s word was no longer respected. Something had to be done to save God’s creation. The Prophet Isaiah cried out to God:

O that you would tear open the heavens and come down,
    so that the mountains would quake at your presence—
     as when fire kindles brushwood
    and the fire causes water to boil—
to make your name known to your adversaries,
    so that the nations might tremble at your presence!   (Isaiah 64:1-2)

God answered the prayer of Isaiah. He tore open the heavens and came down. Reading from today’s Gospel of Mark:

In those days Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. And just as he was coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens torn apart and the Spirit descending like a dove on him. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”   (Mark 1:9-11)

Jesus, the Word of God made flesh, came to join human kind, to share our nature as one of us. This was a second great creation. By so doing God would reconcile the world to himself. Through his death on the cross to pay the price for our sin, Jesus would cause another tearing open of the heavens. We read from the Gospel of Mark:

Then Jesus gave a loud cry and breathed his last. And the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. Now when the centurion, who stood facing him, saw that in this way he breathed his last, he said, “Truly this man was God’s Son!”   (Mark 15:37-38)

God had joined us. Christ has now made it possible for us to join God. This is the third great creation. No longer would God call the Temple in Jerusalem his House. Jesus became the New Temple. All the fullness of God was embodied in Christ. Not only that, but the separation between God and humankind was no more. The Holy of Holies no longer existed.

God invited us to join him in Christ. Jesus told his disciples:

“If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever. This is the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, because he abides with you, and he will be in you.   (John 14:15-17)

The Spirit of God would knit our spirits together with his.

“They who have my commandments and keep them are those who love me; and those who love me will be loved by my Father, and I will love them and reveal myself to them.” Judas (not Iscariot) said to him, “Lord, how is it that you will reveal yourself to us, and not to the world?” Jesus answered him, “Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them.   (John 14:21-23)

We are the new creation of God. We are not part of the body of Christ. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, which you have from God, and that you are not your own? For you were bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your body.   (1 Corinthians 6:19-20)

Jesus, the agent of creation, who made humankind in the image of God, has restored that image which we lost through our his sacrifice on the cross. He has done even more than that. Reading from John’s Gospel:

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.   (John 1:10-13)

We have been given the power of the Holy Spirit to become the son and daughters of God.

For all who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. For you did not receive a spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received a spirit of adoption. When we cry, “Abba! Father!” it is that very Spirit bearing witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs, heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ—if, in fact, we suffer with him so that we may also be glorified with him.   (Romans 8:14-18)

Are we ready to step into our inheritance? The Apostle Paul wrote:

So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation;   (2 Corinthians 5:17-18)

God has given us the power of his Holy Spirit which recreates us into the glorified sons and daughters of God. Do we receive his Power today, with thanksgiving and praise?

Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant,

Make you perfect in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is wellpleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.   (Hebrews 13:20-21)

Leave a comment

Filed under Baptism of our Lord, Epiphany, Eucharist, Gospel, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year B