Tag Archives: Naomi

Twenty Fifth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 27B

Track 1: God Has a Plan for Us

Ruth 3:1-5; 4:13-17
Psalm 127
Hebrews 9:24-28
Mark 12:38-44

Naomi struggled just to survive. Things seem hopeless for them. They stood alone, without family support. Naomi’s husband and two sons had died. She was in a foreign land without support. Only her daughter-in-law Ruth stood by her. Yet things changed. From today’s reading of the Book of Ruth:

Boaz took Ruth and she became his wife. When they came together, the Lord made her conceive, and she bore a son. Then the women said to Naomi, “Blessed be the Lord, who has not left you this day without next-of-kin; and may his name be renowned in Israel! He shall be to you a restorer of life and a nourisher of your old age; for your daughter-in-law who loves you, who is more to you than seven sons, has borne him.” Then Naomi took the child and laid him in her bosom, and became his nurse. The women of the neighborhood gave him a name, saying, “A son has been born to Naomi.” They named him Obed; he became the father of Jesse, the father of David.   (Ruth 4:13-17)

Naomi returned to Judah. Ruth found a husband. And then Ruth was blessed with a child who became significant, not only to her and Naomi, but to all of Israel.

The story of Naomi and Ruth is our story. Their struggle is our struggle. Life can be extremely difficult and challenging. Perhaps one of the greatest challenges in life for us is trusting in the plan that God has for each of us. Do we trust God? Do we accept his ordering and steering of our lives.

The psalmist wrote:

Unless the Lord builds the house,
their labor is in vain who build it.

Unless the Lord watches over the city,
in vain the watchman keeps his vigil.

It is in vain that you rise so early and go to bed so late;
vain, too, to eat the bread of toil,
for he gives to his beloved sleep.  (Psalm 127:1-3)

I remember a difficult time in my life. I struggled to overcome apparent failures and setbacks. I was experiencing so much anxiety that I had trouble getting to sleep at night. Does that ring true for any of you? The psalmist tells us that God “gives his beloved sleep.”

To gain that sleep with all the challenges that faced me, I had to accept an even larger challenge. One of the greatest challenges in life is to accept the plan that God has for our lives. We cannot make things happen by our own wisdom and strength alone. We must trust God and allow him to take over our lives. I believe this is what Naomi learned to do, opening up God’s outpouring of blessings on her. From the wisdom of Solomon:

Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not rely on your own insight. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.   (Proverbs 3:5-6)

Are we ready to accept the challenge of trusting God? From Jeremiah we read:

For surely I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope. Then when you call upon me and come and pray to me, I will hear you.   (Jeremiah 29:11-12)

 

 

 

Track 2: God’s Economy

1 Kings 17:8-16
Psalm 146
Hebrews 9:24-28
Mark 12:38-44

God’s economy is not the economy of Wall Street nor the economy of bankers and the market place.It is not the economy which some are preaching:” If you give to the church enough money you will eventually win God’s lottery.”  It is an economy that can only be understood by revelation from God’s holy word.

Today we will look two widows: one in the Old Testament and one in the New Testament. First the Old Testament:

Then the word of the Lord came to Elijah, saying, “Go now to Zarephath, which belongs to Sidon, and live there; for I have commanded a widow there to feed you.” So he set out and went to Zarephath. When he came to the gate of the town, a widow was there gathering sticks; he called to her and said, “Bring me a little water in a vessel, so that I may drink.” As she was going to bring it, he called to her and said, “Bring me a morsel of bread in your hand.” But she said, “As the Lord your God lives, I have nothing baked, only a handful of meal in a jar, and a little oil in a jug; I am now gathering a couple of sticks, so that I may go home and prepare it for myself and my son, that we may eat it, and die.”   (1 Kings 17:8-16)

From the New Testament:

Jesus sat down opposite the treasury, and watched the crowd putting money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. A poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which are worth a penny. Then he called his disciples and said to them, “Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the treasury. For all of them have contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on.”   (Mark 12:41-44)

What did these widows have in common and what can we learn from them? They were poor and needy, facing desperate circumstances. The widow of Zarephath was barely surviving. There was widespread famine and she had little to eat. Nonetheless, she was willing to give the man of God all that she had. In the New Testament, Jesus observed a widow as she gave all the money she had to God.

How many of us are willing to give God all that we have? What would it take for us to do that? The two widows were desperate. But despite that they were able to take their minds off themselves in order to help others. Hopefully, some of the money in the treasury would go to help others in need. In the case of the widow of Zarephath, she gave all the food that she had to Elijah. In both cases, the widows must have been able to trust God for their provisions. The psalmist wrote:

Happy are they who have the God of Jacob for their help!
whose hope is in the Lord their God;

Who made heaven and earth, the seas, and all that is in them;
who keeps his promise for ever;

Who gives justice to those who are oppressed,
and food to those who hunger.

The Lord sets the prisoners free;
the Lord opens the eyes of the blind;
the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down;

The Lord loves the righteous;
the Lord cares for the stranger;
he sustains the orphan and widow,
but frustrates the way of the wicked.   (Psalm 146:4-8)

Are we willing to contribute to God out of our abundance? That is a big step for many of us. But to do what these two widows did would require an even greater step. We would have to believe that God is a just God,  that he is in control, and that he is willing to take extraordinary steps to care for our wellbeing. Is that our God?

Jesus said that it is hard for the rich to enter the kingdom of heaven. Our financial blessings can be distractions which take us away from depending upon God. The kingdom of God is made up of those people who place God first in their lives and not last, or somewhere down our list of hierarchies.

Where is our focus in life? If we are blessed financially then, all the more, we should be concerned about meeting the needs of others. Our character must become God’s character. God gives justice to those who are oppressed, gives food to those who hunger. lifts up those who are bowed down, cares for the stranger, and sustains the orphan and widow.

God’s economy requires everyone to do their part to help others. Jesus said:

From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded.   (Luke 12:48)

We must take our eyes off ourselves and look at the needs of others. There are great opportunities for us to see the miraculous economy of God. We are part of that economy. All other economies are fleeting at best. They are passing away. Are we passing away with them?

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Twenty Fourth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 26B

Track 1: The Family of God

Ruth 1:1-18
Psalm 146
Hebrews 9:11-14
Mark 12:28-34

Today we begin a look into the life of Ruth, an ancestor of King David, and later that of Jesus of Nazareth. We read from the Book of Ruth:

In the days when the judges ruled, there was a famine in the land, and a certain man of Bethlehem in Judah went to live in the country of Moab, he and his wife and two sons. The name of the man was Elimelech and the name of his wife Naomi, and the names of his two sons were Mahlon and Chilion; they were Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judah. They went into the country of Moab and remained there. But Elimelech, the husband of Naomi, died, and she was left with her two sons. These took Moabite wives; the name of the one was Orpah and the name of the other Ruth. When they had lived there about ten years, both Mahlon and Chilion also died, so that the woman was left without her two sons and her husband.   (Ruth 1:1-5)

A childless widow was tone of the most disadvantaged classes in the ancient world. There was no one to support you, and you had to live on the generosity of strangers. Naomi had no family in Moab, and no one else to help her. She was in a desperate situation.

We have been talking about the importance of the family unit as a building block of our society, But in the case of Naomi there was no more family. She thought it best to return to the land of Judah without her daughters-in-law. So she encouraged them to return to their families so that they might be able to find new husbands. Ruth did not want to do this. Again reading from Ruth:

Naomi said, “See, your sister-in-law has gone back to her people and to her gods; return after your sister-in-law.” But Ruth said,

“Do not press me to leave you
or to turn back from following you!

Where you go, I will go;
Where you lodge, I will lodge;

your people shall be my people,
and your God my God.

Where you die, I will die—
there will I be buried.

May the Lord do thus and so to me,
and more as well,

if even death parts me from you!”

When Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she said no more to her.   (Ruth 1:15-18)

From Ruth’s point of view it would seem that she might have a better future if she stayed in Moab with her family. Naomi faced an unknown future with few guarantees. Why would she want to follow Naomi? Perhaps she realized that Naomi had something that her own family did not have. Perhaps she knew that it would be better to cling to Naomi and her God than to return to her people and their gods.

While one’s personal family is important it is not as important as joining the family of God. There was a time early in Jesus’ ministry where his family apparently wanted to stop him from doing his ministry. From Mark’s Gospel we read:

Then his mother and his brothers came; and standing outside, they sent to him and called him. A crowd was sitting around him; and they said to him, “Your mother and your brothers and sisters are outside, asking for you.” And he replied, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” And looking at those who sat around him, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! Whoever does the will of God is my brother and sister and mother.”   (Mark 3:31-35)

Doing the will of God is all important. Reading from today’s Old Testament lesson:

Moses said: Now this is the commandment–the statutes and the ordinances–that the Lord your God charged me to teach you to observe in the land that you are about to cross into and occupy, so that you and your children and your children’s children, may fear the Lord your God all the days of your life, and keep all his decrees and his commandments that I am commanding you, so that your days may be long. Hear therefore, O Israel, and observe them diligently, so that it may go well with you, and so that you may multiply greatly in a land flowing with milk and honey, as the Lord, the God of your ancestors, has promised you.   (Deuteronomy 6:1-3)

The blessings of God are received through obedience. It is more important to be in the family of God than our own families. In fact, it has been prophesied that families will turn against themselves. She said:

Brother will betray brother to death, and a father his child, and children will rise against parents and have them put to death; and you will be hated by all because of my name. But the one who endures to the end will be saved.   (Mark 13:12-13)

We are entering those last days. We need the support of the family of God. We need to lend our support to those who are being persecuted because of their faith. Let us take courage because God is with us.

 

 

 

Track 2: The Commandments and the Kingdom

Deuteronomy 6:1-9
Psalm 119:1-8
Hebrews 9:11-14
Mark 12:28-34

Many scribes and Pharisees were asking Jesus questions in order to trick him or to trip him up. In today’s Gospel reading that does not appear to be the case:

One of the scribes came near and heard the

disputing with one another, and seeing that Jesus answered them well, he asked him, “Which commandment is the first of all?” Jesus answered, “The first is, ‘Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is one; you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ The second is this, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” Then the scribe said to him, “You are right, Teacher; you have truly said that ‘he is one, and besides him there is no other’; and ‘to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the strength,’ and ‘to love one’s neighbor as oneself,’ —this is much more important than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.” When Jesus saw that he answered wisely, he said to him, “You are not far from the kingdom of God.”   (Mark 12:28-34)

Jesus perceived this scribe was sincere. The scribe understood how important the commandments of God were. How seriously do we take those commandments today? Moses warned the children of Israel to take them seriously:

Moses said: Now this is the commandment–the statutes and the ordinances–that the Lord your God charged me to teach you to observe in the land that you are about to cross into and occupy, so that you and your children and your children’s children, may fear the Lord your God all the days of your life, and keep all his decrees and his commandments that I am commanding you, so that your days may be long. Hear therefore, O Israel, and observe them diligently, so that it may go well with you, and so that you may multiply greatly in a land flowing with milk and honey, as the Lord, the God of your ancestors, has promised you.   (Deuteronomy 6:1-3)

We remember what happened to the children of Israel. They lost their way in the wilderness. Many people today, including church goers, have lost their way. Perhaps we as parents, mentors, and church leaders are, at least, partly responsible. Our young people are bombarded by the media with practically everything that is opposed to the faith.

God saw this forming and he gave Moses the remedy:

Hear, O Israel: The Lord is our God, the Lord alone. You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might. Keep these words that I am commanding you today in your heart. Recite them to your children and talk about them when you are at home and when you are away, when you lie down and when you rise. Bind them as a sign on your hand, fix them as an emblem on your forehead, and write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.   (Deuteronomy 6:4-9)

We are to teach our children the commandments of God and not rely on others to do so. We are to take every opportunity during at our disposal. The media is taking opportunity to do otherwise. The way of the world has become the culture. The world makes so many empty promises. Sooner or later we discover that we have been lied to, In his Sermon on the Mount Jesus said:

“Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the road is easy that leads to destruction, and there are many who take it. For the gate is narrow and the road is hard that leads to life, and there are few who find it.   (Matthew 7:13-14)

Our eternal life is at stake. Nonetheless, the joy we find in this life is tied to the commandments of God. The psalmist wrote:

Happy are they whose way is blameless,
who walk in the law of the Lord!

Happy are they who observe his decrees
and seek him with all their hearts!   (Psalm 119:1-2)

The scribe in today’s Gospel reading was not far from the Kingdom. We want to be as close the the Kingdom as possible. Jesus is the way. He is the gate that is narrow. Let us enter into him and steer as many people as possible to him, especially our families. Amen.

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