Tag Archives: Moses

Tuesday in the Fifth Week of Lent

The Power of the Cross

The serpent is a symbol of rebellion against God. In the wilderness the children of Israel rebelled. For this reason God sent poisonous serpents into their camp. Many of the Israelites died. As a remedy, God had Moses place a bronze serpent up on a pole so that everyone who was bitten would be spared if they looked upon the serpent. The first step in receiving forgiveness for one’s sin is the acknowledgment of that sin. The Israelites were required to look at a symbol of their rebellion:

So Moses made a serpent of bronze, and put it upon a pole; and whenever a serpent bit someone, that person would look at the serpent of bronze and live.   (Numbers 21:9)

Jesus is our Savior but we need to acknowledge who He is and what He has done for us. Many of the religious leaders in Jesus’s day would not acknowledge their sin. They were blinded about many things, but particularly about there sins.

They were also blinded about who Jesus was. For this reason they hung him on a cross. Jesus explained that after they had done this, they would see him in a different light:

Then said Jesus unto them, When ye have lifted up the Son of man, then shall ye know that I am he, and that I do nothing of myself; but as my Father hath taught me, I speak these things. (John 8:28)

Our acts of rebellion against God have crucified Jesus as much as anyone’s. If we truly look upon Jesus on the cross and realize his act of great sacrifice and love, then our hearts will convict us and bring us to repentance. Do we look the other way or do we see Jesus high and lifted up?

And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.   (John 3:14-15)

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Third Sunday in Lent, Year C

This Is My Name Forever

God had a special purpose for Moses. He had watched over Moses and protected him, preparing him for an encounter that we read about today. From the Book of Exodus:

Then Moses said, “I must turn aside and look at this great sight, and see why the bush is not burned up.” When the Lord saw that he had turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, “Moses, Moses!” And he said, “Here I am.” Then he said, “Come no closer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.” He said further, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.” And Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.   (Exodus 3:3-6)

God called out to Moses. When Moses discovered that God was the one who was calling him, he hid his face. We are made in the image of God, but we are not God. God’s presence can be overwhelming.

We remember God’s call to Isaiah when the prophet exclaimed:

“Woe is me! I am lost, for I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips; yet my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!”   (Isaiah 6:5)

God has been calling many of us. He has been calling us all our lives. Are we ready for our encounter with him? We may think that we already know God. That was true of Job. But Job had his encountered God, he discovered another whole dimension of God. God has a question for Job:

“Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?
    Tell me, if you have understanding.
Who determined its measurements—surely you know!
    Or who stretched the line upon it?   (Job 38:4-5)

We do not have encounters with God without a reason. God had a specific plan and purpose for Moses. Moses was called to deliver the Israelites from slavery in Egypt and lead them to a new land which God had promised to give to the descendants of Abraham.

Moses protested against his call with several excuses. His first excuse was –  “Who am I?” God has to tell Moses that it is not about who he is but who God i. Again, from Exodus:

But Moses said to God, “If I come to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” God said to Moses, “I am who I am.” He said further, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘I am has sent me to you.’” God also said to Moses, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you’:

This is my name forever,
and this my title for all generations.”   (Exodus 3:13-15)

Do we understand who the one is who calls us? His name is “Yahweh.” He is the great “I AM.”

He never had a beginning. Nobody made God. God simply is. He did not come into being because he is being. God is absolute reality. There is no reality before him. God will always be.

God is utterly independent. He depends on nothing to bring him into being or support him or counsel him or make him what he is. Everything that is not God depends totally on God. We live only by his breath.

God is constant. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. He cannot be improved. He is not becoming anything. He is who he is.

God brings us into being and sustains our lives. He calls us and gives us a ministry. It may seem too much for us, and it is. But with God all things are possible. He stands behind and supports us in all that he asks us to do.

How do we respond to him. We might say that we have not had an encounter with God. God is always at the ready. Are we now ready to listen. This Lenten Season offers us an opportunity to focus on God. He wants us to know who he is. He wants us to understand how great he is. He wants us to experience the power of his name.

From the Book of Proverbs:

The name of the Lord is a strong tower;
    the righteous run into it and are safe.   (Proverbs 18:10)

God wants us to run to him. He has heard all the excuses before. Why would we waste his time with our excuses? The psalmist wrote:

O God, you are my God; eagerly I seek you;
my soul thirsts for you, my flesh faints for you,
as in a barren and dry land where there is no water.

Therefore I have gazed upon you in your holy place,
that I might behold your power and your glory.   (Psalm 63:1-2)

Are we still hesitant to approach God? Do we not know who he is and what he can do? He is without limit. God is calling us. God is ready to empower us. He is ready to bless us. He has called us to produce good fruit for his kingdom.

Jesus told the parable of the barren fig tree:

“A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.'”   (Luke 13:5-9)

Moses tried to resist God at first, but, ultimately became the law giver. He was, perhaps, the greatest figure in the Old Testament. He was great because God was with him. He learned to trust God and walk daily with him.

God has been patient with us. But now is the time to fulfill our destiny. Now is the time to bear fruit. Now is the time to allow God to glorify himself through us. Amen.

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Last Sunday after Epiphany, Year C

The Veil Was Torn Apart

During this Season of Epiphany we have been looking at various examples of how God manifested his presence and power. Today, we look at the Mount of Transfiguration experience of Peter, James, and John. These disciples had been taught directly by Jesus. They knew him as a great teacher of the Law of Moses. They had witnessed his healings and miracles first hand. They were starting to realize that Jesus was the promised Messiah. But they were not prepared for what was about to take place on the mountain. Reading from Luke:

About eight days after Peter had acknowledged Jesus as the Christ of God, Jesus took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray. And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly they saw two men, Moses and Elijah, talking to him. They appeared in glory and were speaking of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. Now Peter and his companions were weighed down with sleep; but since they had stayed awake, they saw his glory and the two men who stood with him. Just as they were leaving him, Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah”–not knowing what he said. While he was saying this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were terrified as they entered the cloud. Then from the cloud came a voice that said, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!”   (Luke 9:28-35)

The disciples saw Jesus in his glorious state, standing with Moses and Elijah. They were overwhelmed.

Moses had gone up to the mountain to talk with God. When he came down the Israelites were not prepared for what they saw:

Moses came down from Mount Sinai. As he came down from the mountain with the two tablets of the covenant in his hand, Moses did not know that the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God. When Aaron and all the Israelites saw Moses, the skin of his face was shining, and they were afraid to come near him.   (Exodus 34:29-35)

The Israelites saw the reflected glory 0n the face of Moses. Just a hint of God’s glory could overwhelm the onlooker. Again, from Exodus:

Afterward all the Israelites came near, and he gave them in commandment all that the Lord had spoken with him on Mount Sinai. When Moses had finished speaking with them, he put a veil on his face; but whenever Moses went in before the Lord to speak with him, he would take the veil off, until he came out; and when he came out, and told the Israelites what he had been commanded, the Israelites would see the face of Moses, that the skin of his face was shining; and Moses would put the veil on his face again, until he went in to speak with him.   (Exodus 34:29-35)

God is a holy God and we are sinners. God has had to veil himself so that anyone who has contact with him would not be destroyed. He established a temple arrangement in which the Ark of the Covenant would remain behind a curtain or veil in a room called the “most holy place.” Only the high priest could enter this place. He did it only once a year to offer the atoning sacrifice for the sins of the people.

How do we approach God today? Do we look to God through a veil? The Apostle Paul tells us that is unnecessary:

Since, then, we have such a hope, we act with great boldness, not like Moses, who put a veil over his face to keep the people of Israel from gazing at the end of the glory that was being set aside. But their minds were hardened. Indeed, to this very day, when they hear the reading of the old covenant, that same veil is still there, since only in Christ is it set aside.   (2 Corinthians 3:12-14)

Even today, preachers and teachers speak about going behind a veil to get in touch with God. There is no veil. The veil has been torn apart. From the Gospel of Matthew:

Then Jesus cried again with a loud voice and breathed his last. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. The earth shook, and the rocks were split. The tombs also were opened, and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised.   (Matthew 27:50-52)

We are allowed to look upon the glory of God. We are called to look upon the glory of God. The Apostle Paul has written:

Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And all of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another; for this comes from the Lord, the Spirit.   (2 Corinthians 3:17-18)

We become who or what we worship. Do we look upon glory or do we celebrate the flesh? But what about the high priest idea? We are not high priests. No we are not, but we have a high priest standing in for us. From the Book of Hebrews:

For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who in every respect has been tested as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore approach the throne of grace with boldness, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.   (Hebrews 4:15-16)

Are we ready to approach the throne of grace without any restrictions? Again, from Hebrews:

Therefore, my friends, since we have confidence to enter the sanctuary by the blood of Jesus, by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain (that is, through his flesh), and since we have a great priest over the house of God, et us approach with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast to the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who has promised is faithful.   (Hebrews 10:19-23)

God is calling us. How will we respond? In fear or in joy?

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First Sunday after Christmas, Year C

The Word Became Flesh

The Gospel of John does not have an Infancy narrative as do the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. Rather, John speaks of a time before the birth of the Christ Child. He writes of the One who pre-existed the world and was the very agent of all creation:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

Do we know Jesus beyond the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes? Many of His own Jewish people did not comprehend who Jesus was when they were privileged to see him in person:

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him.  (John 1:10-11)

The remarkable thing is that the creator God entered he world of His own creation on our behalf. He did so on our behalf. In Jesus, God made himself vulnerable to humankind, in order to reveal his true nature and heart:

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:14)

Though the Gospel of John does not speak about the infancy of Jesus, it does allude to a different sort of infancy narrative. It speaks of our infancy narrative. We are reborn as children of God in him. The Apostle Paul writes:

But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God.   (Galatians 4:4-7)

Do we recognize who Jesus is? Has his Spirit entered into our hearts? Only by his Spirit can we be reborn. We cannot become righteous on our own. The law of God can never make us righteous. It serves as our education concerning righteousness. Jesus, alone, is the one who makes us righteous. John writes:

From his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. The law indeed was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known.   (John 1:16-19)

As an infant Jesus was wrapped in swaddling clothes. From the Gospel of Luke:

And Mary brought forth her firstborn Son, and wrapped Him in swaddling cloths, and laid Him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.   (Luke 2:7)

Have we been wrapped by Jesus? The psalmist wrote:

I will greatly rejoice in the Lord,
my whole being shall exult in my God;

for he has clothed me with the garments of salvation,
he has covered me with the robe of righteousness,

as a bridegroom decks himself with a garland,
and as a bride adorns herself with her jewels.   (Isaiah 61:10)

As infants, we need the swaddling of the Holy Spirit. All we need to do is recognize our need and allow a loving Savior to wrap us in his love. The Christmas Season is a special time to experience the warmth of Jesus. At times we may feel all alone, but he is always with us. He is Immanuel, God with us. Let us bask in the glory and glow of his presence. Amen.

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