Tag Archives: Moses

Saint Simon and Saint Jude

st simon and st jude2Called to Preach the Gospel

In today’s Old Testament reading Moses declares:

Give ear, O heavens, and I will speak; let the earth hear the words of my mouth. May my teaching drop like the rain, my speech condense like the dew; like gentle rain on grass, like showers on new growth. For I will proclaim the name of the LORD; ascribe greatness to our God! The Rock, his work is perfect, and all his ways are just. A faithful God, without deceit, just and upright is he.   (Deuteronomy 32:1-4)

Moses knew that he was blessed by the Spirit of God. Thus, he realized that he had an obligation and responsibility to teach his word.

Saint Simon and Saint Jude were blessed by God. They were called by Jesus directly to preach and teach the Gospel. Some ancient Christian writers say that Simon and Jude went together as missionaries to Persia, and were martyred there. If this is true, it explains why they are usually put together. Little else is known of their ministry. Nevertheless, they were faithful to their calling. After all, the calling of God is not to speak about who we are but about what God has done for us in Christ.

Before He was crucified Jesus told His disciples that they would receive the gift of the Holy Spirit so that they would be able to preach on his behalf. That is the work of the Holy Spirit does. Jesus said:

“When the Advocate comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who comes from the Father, he will testify on my behalf. You also are to testify because you have been with me from the beginning.”    (John 15:27)

Have we received the Holy Spirit? Have we also been called by to testify to the truth of the Gospel? The Apostle Paul wrote that Jesus came to reconcile the world unto Himself and that our testimony is important in that process:

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ and gave us the ministry of reconciliation: that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them. And he has committed to us the message of reconciliation.   (2 Corinthians 5:17-19)

The new creation that God has brought about in Christ brings reconciliation between all people. Paul writes:

Now in Christ Jesus you Gentiles, who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. For he is our peace; in his flesh he has made both groups into one and has broken down the dividing wall, that is, the hostility between us. He has abolished the law with its commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new humanity in place of the two, thus making peace, and might reconcile both groups to God in one body through the cross, thus putting to death that hostility through it. So he came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near; for through him both of us have access in one Spirit to the Father.   (Ephesians 2:13-18)

People are so divided today. Our responsibility is to bring unity in Christ because we have been given this “message of reconciliation.” We cannot do this on our own, but we have been given the Holy Spirit to guide us and direct us in this ministry. Let us follow the faithful example of men like Simon and Jude.

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, Feast Day, Gospel, Holy Day, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, Saint Jude, Saint Simon, sermon, sermon development, Year A

Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 25

Track 1: From Generation to Generation

Deuteronomy 34:1-12
Psalm 90:1-6, 13-17
1 Thessalonians 2:1-8
Matthew 22:34-46

The psalmist wrote:

Lord, you have been our refuge
from one generation to another.

Before the mountains were brought forth,
or the land and the earth were born,
from age to age you are God.

You turn us back to the dust and say,
“Go back, O child of earth.”

For a thousand years in your sight are like yesterday when it is past
and like a watch in the night.   (Psalm 90:1-4)

God is a generational God. He has plans our lives from day to da.He also has a generational plan for our lives as well. He sees the short term, but he also sees in the long term. He delivered the children of Israel from captivity and bondage in Egypt under the leadership of Moses. Generations before he promised Abraham a homeland. God was now delivering on this promise. From todays Old Testament reading:

Moses went up from the plains of Moab to Mount Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, which is opposite Jericho, and the Lord showed him the whole land: Gilead as far as Dan, all Naphtali, the land of Ephraim and Manasseh, all the land of Judah as far as the Western Sea, the Negeb, and the Plain—that is, the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees—as far as Zoar. The Lord said to him, “This is the land of which I swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, saying, ‘I will give it to your descendants’; I have let you see it with your eyes, but you shall not cross over there.”   (Deuteronomy 34:1-4)

Moses had completed his assignment. Now it was time to pass the baton to a new generation:

Joshua son of Nun was full of the spirit of wisdom, because Moses had laid his hands on him; and the Israelites obeyed him, doing as the Lord had commanded Moses.   (Deuteronomy 34:9)

Joshua would lead the children of Israel into the promise land. He had been trained under Moses. But most importantly, the hand of God was upon him. God always ensures that he has the next leader prepared to step in. But that leader must be willing to endure suffering and trials.

From generation to generation God was unfolding his plan for salvation of Israel and the entire human race. Moving forward several generations we see how God’s plan was coming into focus. The religious leaders during Jesus’ earthly ministry, however, failed to understand what God was doing. They did everything in their power to derail God’s plan. They were asking Jesus questions to trip Jesus up. But they were not ready for Jesus to question them. From today’s Gospel reading:

Now while the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them this question: “What do you think of the Messiah? Whose son is he?” They said to him, “The son of David.” He said to them, “How is it then that David by the Spirit calls him Lord, saying,

‘The Lord said to my Lord,
“Sit at my right hand,
until I put your enemies under your feet”’?

If David thus calls him Lord, how can he be his son?” No one was able to give him an answer, nor from that day did anyone dare to ask him any more questions.   (Matthew 22:41-46)

Jesus was telling the Pharisees that God’s plan for humanity began far earlier than King David and extended into a future that would never end. Through Nathan the prophet God promised David:

“When your days are complete and you lie down with your fathers, I will raise up your descendant after you, who will come forth from you, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for my name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever. Your house and your kingdom shall endure before you forever. Your throne shall be established forever” (2 Samuel 7:12 13,16)

The Pharisees were too short sighted. God was unfolding his plan before them, but they were stuck on themselves. God’s plan for salvation began long before David, long before Abraham. It began at the very beginning of creation. We read in the Book of Revelation that Jesus was the the Lamb of God, slain from the foundation of the world (Revelation 13:8). The psalmist wrote:

Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised,

One generation shall laud your works to another,
and shall declare your mighty acts.
On the glorious splendor of your majesty,
and on your wondrous works, I will meditate.
The might of your awesome deeds shall be proclaimed,
and I will declare your greatness.
They shall celebrate the fame of your abundant goodness,
and shall sing aloud of your righteousness.

The Lord is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.
The Lord is good to all,
and his compassion is over all that he has made.

All your works shall give thanks to you, O Lord,
and all your faithful shall bless you.
They shall speak of the glory of your kingdom,
and tell of your power,
to make known to all people your mighty deeds,
and the glorious splendor of your kingdom.
Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom,
and your dominion endures throughout all generations.   (Psalm 145::3-13)

We may now be living in the last generation. How do we fit into God’s plan? Are we stuck on ourselves? Are we blind to what the Lord is doing? What is our task?

Will we speak of the glory of God’s kingdom? Will we tell of his power, to make known to all people his mighty deeds? Will we tell gospel of Jesus others about God’s everlasting kingdom? God’s generation plan has come down to us. Are we not to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ until he comes again? We may need a  wider vision. We may need a longer timeline, onet hat extends throughout all eternity.

 

 

Track 2; You Shall Be Holy

Leviticus 19:1-2,15-18
Psalm 1
1 Thessalonians 2:1-8
Matthew 22:34-46

What does the Lord require of us? Reading from Leviticus:

The Lord spoke to Moses, saying:

Speak to all the congregation of the people of Israel and say to them: You shall be holy, for I the Lord your God am holy.   (Leviticus 19:1-2)

What does it mean that God is holy? The Hebrew word for holy is Kodesh (קודש). It means set apart for a specific purpose. God has created the world, but he is greater than his creation. Israel was set apart by God from the other nations of the world to be a kingdom of priests.

What does it mean that we should be holy? We are to be set apart from the world as servants of God. He is of a much higher level than we are, but he wants to raise us up to dwell with him.. We cannot achieve this level on our own. God says to us:

Consecrate yourselves and be holy, because I am the Lord your God. Keep my decrees and follow them. I am the Lord, who makes you holy.   (Leviticus 20:7-8)

How does this happen? The psalmist wrote:

Happy are they who have not walked in the counsel of the wicked,
nor lingered in the way of sinners,
nor sat in the seats of the scornful!

Their delight is in the law of the Lord,
and they meditate on his law day and night.

They are like trees planted by streams of water,
bearing fruit in due season, with leaves that do not wither;
everything they do shall prosper.   (Psalm 1:1-3)

The most powerful way to effect this change is by letting the Word of God dwell in us richly:

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God.   (Colossians 3:16

When we embrace scripture without reservation, it will energetically work God’s will in uz. The Apostle Paul wrote to the Thessalonians:

We also constantly give thanks to God for this, that when you received the word of God that you heard from us, you accepted it not as a human word but as what it really is, God’s word, which is also at work in you believers.  (1 Thessalonians 2:13)

God’s word is working inus, but we must cooperate.

Therefore, my beloved, just as you have always obeyed me, not only in my presence, but much more now in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling; for it is God who is at work in you, enabling you both to will and to work for his good pleasure.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, Gospel, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year A

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 24

Track 1: Show Me Your Glory

Exodus 33:12-23
Psalm 99
1 Thessalonians 1:1-10
Matthew 22:15-22

There was a point in the wilderness when God threatened to send the children of Israel on their journey without his presence. Moses interceded for Israel, telling God that he could not go on without God’ presence. He implored God:

“If your presence will not go, do not carry us up from here. For how shall it be known that I have found favor in your sight, I and your people, unless you go with us? In this way, we shall be distinct, I and your people, from every people on the face of the earth.”   (Exodus 33:15-16)

Moses understood that, without God, he could not lead the children of Israel. In fact, we read in scripture how humble Moses was. God responded to him:

The Lord said to Moses, “I will do the very thing that you have asked; for you have found favor in my sight, and I know you by name.” Moses said, “Show me your glory, I pray.” And he said, “I will make all my goodness pass before you, and will proclaim before you the name, ‘The Lord’; and I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy. But,” he said, “you cannot see my face; for no one shall see me and live.” And the Lord continued, “See, there is a place by me where you shall stand on the rock; and while my glory passes by I will put you in a cleft of the rock, and I will cover you with my hand until I have passed by; then I will take away my hand, and you shall see my back; but my face shall not be seen.”   (Exodus 33:17-23)

Moses had found with God. He had a relationship with God. As an intercessor for Israel, he would boldly go before the throne of God. This was not done out of pride, but out of concern for others. In fact, the scriptures tells us this:

Now the man Moses was very humble, more so than anyone else on the face of the earth.  (Numbers 12:3)

Where do we stand in our relationship with God. Are we prideful? Are we humble? Can we go boldly before the throne of God to seek his help? Jesus, by his blood, has opened a door for us that Moses did not have. Are we willing to walk through it?

Yes, God has done a great work, but there are still some requirements on our part to enter his presence. The psalmist wrote:

Proclaim the greatness of the Lord our God
and fall down before his footstool;
he is the Holy One.

Moses and Aaron among his priests,
and Samuel among those who call upon his Name,
they called upon the Lord, and he answered them.

He spoke to them out of the pillar of cloud;
they kept his testimonies and the decree that he gave them.

O Lord our God, you answered them indeed;
you were a God who forgave them,
yet punished them for their evil deeds.

Proclaim the greatness of the Lord our God
and worship him upon his holy hill;
for the Lord our God is the Holy One.   (Psalm 99:5-9)

The children of Israel were only interested in the hand of God. Moses spoke to God face to face. We can be a type of Moses if we put the needs of others before our own. If I am to have the humility of Moses, I must consider others better than myself and look out for their interests (Philippians 2:3). We can be a type of Moses if we humble ourselves before God, when we acknowledge that we cannot accomplish anything without his help.

We can have a close fellowship with God when we proclaim the greatness of the Lord our God and worship him, When we seek God with all our hearts, when we please God by our actions, God will reveal himself to us in new and deeper ways. Let our prayer be: Show us your glory. It is not about u. It is all about God

 

 

Track 2: Church and State

Isaiah 45:1-7
Psalm 96:1-9, (10-13)
1 Thessalonians 1:1-10
Matthew 22:15-22

God spoke through the Prophet Jeremiah:

“For my people are foolish,
    they do not know me;
they are stupid children,
    they have no understanding.
They are skilled in doing evil,
    but do not know how to do good.”   (Jeremiah 4:22)

The most incredible thing about the nature of evil is the level of ignorance that seems to accompany it. The Pharisees proved this many times as they did in today’s Gospel reading:

The Pharisees went and plotted to entrap Jesus in what he said. So they sent their disciples to him, along with the Herodians, saying, “Teacher, we know that you are sincere, and teach the way of God in accordance with truth, and show deference to no one; for you do not regard people with partiality. Tell us, then, what you think. Is it lawful to pay taxes to the emperor, or not?” But Jesus, aware of their malice, said, “Why are you putting me to the test, you hypocrites? Show me the coin used for the tax.” And they brought him a denarius. Then he said to them, “Whose head is this, and whose title?” They answered, “The emperor’s.” Then he said to them, “Give therefore to the emperor the things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” When they heard this, they were amazed; and they left him and went away.   ()

Government authorities have used the game of church and state intimidate and confuse believers. Jesus would have none of it. There is no separation between church and state in God’s mind. God is Lord of both church and state. Mary, the mother of Jesus, said in her song of praise:

He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
    and lifted up the lowly.   (Luke 1:52)

God raised up Cyrus, king of Persia, to restore the nation of Israel

Thus says the Lord to his anointed, to Cyrus,
whose right hand I have grasped

to subdue nations before him
and strip kings of their robes,

to open doors before him–
and the gates shall not be closed:

I will go before you and level the mountains,

I will break in pieces the doors of bronze
and cut through the bars of iron,

I will give you the treasures of darkness
and riches hidden in secret places,

so that you may know that it is I, the Lord,
the God of Israel, who call you by your name.

For the sake of my servant Jacob,
and Israel my chosen,

I call you by your name, I surname you, though you do not know me.

I am the Lord, and there is no other;
besides me there is no god.
I arm you, though you do not know me,

so that they may know, from the rising of the sun
and from the west, that there is no one besides me;
I am the Lord, and there is no other.   (Isaiah 45:1-6)

Cyrus was no Sunday school teacher. Yet he was anointed by God for a specific purpose. Clever government officials and politicians would have us believe that God has no hand n government. He has the whole world in his hands. Perhaps it is tme for us to be less clever and more in tune with the purposes of God.

“For my people are foolish,
    they do not know me;
they are stupid children,
    they have no understanding.
They are skilled in doing evil,
    but do not know how to do good.”   (Jeremiah 4:22)

Do we know how to do good? We cannot even know what is good until we know the Lord.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, Gospel, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year A

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 23

Track 1: The Mercy of God

Exodus 32:1-14
Psalm 106:1-6, 19-23
Philippians 4:1-9
Matthew 22:1-14

Human nature is curious thing. It was true for the children of Israel and it seems to be true for us today, at least for me. We can soon forget the great things that God has done for us. God had done great signs and wonders to deliver his people from bondage in Egypt. But in todays Old Testament reading we have this incredible scene:

When the people saw that Moses delayed to come down from the mountain, the people gathered around Aaron, and said to him, “Come, make gods for us, who shall go before us; as for this Moses, the man who brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.” Aaron said to them, “Take off the gold rings that are on the ears of your wives, your sons, and your daughters, and bring them to me.” So all the people took off the gold rings from their ears, and brought them to Aaron. He took the gold from them, formed it in a mold, and cast an image of a calf; and they said, “These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!”   (Exodus 32:1-4)

Can we put ourselves in God’s perspective? How could the children of Israel reject him after all that he had done? He was ready to release his wrath. Moses desperately intercede for Israel:

But Moses implored the Lord his God, and said, “O Lord, why does your wrath burn hot against your people, whom you brought out of the land of Egypt with great power and with a mighty hand? Why should the Egyptians say, ‘It was with evil intent that he brought them out to kill them in the mountains, and to consume them from the face of the earth’? Turn from your fierce wrath; change your mind and do not bring disaster on your people. Remember Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, your servants, how you swore to them by your own self, saying to them, ‘I will multiply your descendants like the stars of heaven, and all this land that I have promised I will give to your descendants, and they shall inherit it forever.’” And the Lord changed his mind about the disaster that he planned to bring on his people.   (Exodus 32:11-14)

We should never underestimate the power of intercessory prayer. The psalmist wrote:

We have sinned as our forebears did;
we have done wrong and dealt wickedly.

Israel made a bull-calf at Horeb
and worshiped a molten image;

And so they exchanged their Glory
for the image of an ox that feeds on grass.

They forgot God their Savior,
who had done great things in Egypt,

Wonderful deeds in the land of Ham,
and fearful things at the Red Sea.

So he would have destroyed them,
had not Moses his chosen stood before him in the breach,
to turn away his wrath from consuming them.   (Psalm 106:6, 19-23)

Do we not need intercession for our nation today? If we reject God he will ultimately reject us. Jesus told this parable concerning the rejection of God’s mercy:

Once more Jesus spoke to the people in parables, saying: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding banquet for his son. He sent his slaves to call those who had been invited to the wedding banquet, but they would not come. Again he sent other slaves, saying, ‘Tell those who have been invited: Look, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready; come to the wedding banquet.’ But they made light of it and went away, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his slaves, mistreated them, and killed them. The king was enraged. He sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his slaves, ‘The wedding is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore into the main streets, and invite everyone you find to the wedding banquet.’ Those slaves went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both good and bad; so the wedding hall was filled with guests.   (Matthew 22:1-10)

The parable is about the wrath of God as well as his mercy. God goes out of his way to show mercy, especially to those who can acknowledge his mercy and loving kindness. When I look back on my life I see nothing but mercy and loving kindness. I see God acting on my behalf when I did little to deserve his help. Often times I failed to even ask for his help.

God tempers his judgement with mercy, especially when we call upon him from the heart. The Apostle Paul tells us how to do that. Paul writes:

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 4:4-7)

We can have peace in our hearts when we remember how God has shown mercy to us in the past. Israel forgot. We, too, can easily forget. Thus, when we pray, we should not let any difficult circumstances steal our joy in the Lord. Let us settle it now: God is good, all the time. Doubt and unbelief can so easily creep in when we do not focus on the mercy of God.

Jesus’ parable ends with a dire warning:

“But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing a wedding robe, and he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding robe?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”   (Matthew 22:11-14)

We should not take the mercy of God for granted. Out of his mercy God has provided salvation for us all. He had given us his Son Jesus as a sacrifice for our sins upon a cruel cross in order that we might be able to stand before on the day of judgement. God will be looking not at us, but at this Son Jesus in us, provided that we are wearing a robe of righteousness. This robe has been purchased for us by the blood of Jesus. We must wear it. We must allow Jesus to robe us each day. He wants to continually wash away all our sins. This means our confession of them and prayers for help in overcoming them is required. Our choice today is the peace of God in our hearts or the turmoil that comes when we worship the golden calf of this world.

 

 

 

Track 2: The Wedding Banquet

Isaiah 25:1-9
Psalm 23
Philippians 4:1-9
Matthew 22:1-14

Today’s Gospel speaks to our time:

Once more Jesus spoke to the people in parables, saying: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding banquet for his son. He sent his slaves to call those who had been invited to the wedding banquet, but they would not come. Again he sent other slaves, saying, ‘Tell those who have been invited: Look, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready; come to the wedding banquet.’ But they made light of it and went away, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his slaves, mistreated them, and killed them. The king was enraged. He sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his slaves, ‘The wedding is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore into the main streets, and invite everyone you find to the wedding banquet.’ Those slaves went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both good and bad; so the wedding hall was filled with guests.   (Matthew 22:1-10)

This parable is about the end times. It is about the day and hour in which we live. It is about the Messianic banquet in heaven for all true believers. It is about Jesus returning to the earth and ruing from Jerusalem. The Prophet Isaiah wrote about this time:

On this mountain the Lord of hosts will make for all peoples
a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wines,
of rich food filled with marrow, of well-aged wines strained clear.

And he will destroy on this mountain
the shroud that is cast over all peoples,
the sheet that is spread over all nations;
he will swallow up death forever.

Then the Lord God will wipe away the tears from all faces,
and the disgrace of his people he will take away from all the earth,
for the Lord has spoken.

It will be said on that day, Lo, this is our God; we have waited for him, so that he might save us.
This is the Lord for whom we have waited;
let us be glad and rejoice in his salvation.   (Isaiah 25:6-9)

The millennial reign of Christ will be a glorious time when Jesus returns to right all wrongs. But this time is reserved for true believers only. We should not take the mercy of God for granted. Jesus ends  his parable with a dire warning:

“But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing a wedding robe, and he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding robe?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”   (Matthew 22:11-14)

Out of his mercy God has provided salvation for us all. He has given us his Son Jesus as a sacrifice for our sins upon a cruel cross in order that we might be able to stand before on the day of judgement. God will be looking not at us, but at this Son Jesus in us, provided that we are wearing a robe of righteousness. This robe has been purchased for us by the blood of Jesus. We must wear it. We must allow Jesus to robe us each day. He wants to continually wash away all our sins. This means our confession of them and prayers for help in overcoming them is required. Our choice today is the peace of God in our hearts or the turmoil that comes when we worship the golden calf of this world.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, Gospel, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year A