Tag Archives: Millennial Reign

Last Sunday after Pentecost: Year A Christ the King

The  Shepherd King

Ezekiel 34:11-16, 20-24
Psalm 100  or Psalm 95:1-7a
Ephesians 1:15-23
Matthew 25:31-46

The concept of kingship maybe difficult for most Americans. After all, the American Revolution was a rebellion against the King of England. The King just had too much authority. “Taxation without representation.”

The children of Israel of the Old Testament wanted a king. They wanted to have a king like the other nations that surround them. God did not think this was a good idea, but they persisted. Thus, God anointed Saul as their first king. He started out as a ruler who listed to God and had his blessing. Saul became disobedient, however. He wanted to be his own man. By the end of his reign he was into witchcraft and the worship of demons.

History often repeats itself. How many devil worshipers do we have in the political leadership of our day? Power is a dangerous temptation.

God chose a shepherd boy to replace Saul as king. David became not only became king but his throne was established forever. From the Prophet Isaiah we read:

For a child has been born for us,
    a son given to us;
authority rests upon his shoulders;
    and he is named
Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
    Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
His authority shall grow continually,
    and there shall be endless peace
for the throne of David and his kingdom.
    He will establish and uphold it
with justice and with righteousness
    from this time onward and forevermore.
The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.   (Isaiah 9:6-7)

David was a man after God’s own heart. Yet David had some serious flaws as do we all. A descendant of David would become the flawless Shepherd King. His name is Jesus and we celebrate his kingship today.

What makes Jesus different from all other kings? He cares for his subjects. The kings of this earth have led God’s people astray:

All we like sheep have gone astray;
    we have all turned to our own way,
and the Lord has laid on him
    the iniquity of us all.   (Isaiah 53:6)

Jesus is the shepherd king who came to restore us. From Ezekiel we read:

Thus says the Lord God: I myself will search for my sheep, and will seek them out. As shepherds seek out their flocks when they are among their scattered sheep, so I will seek out my sheep. I will rescue them from all the places to which they have been scattered on a day of clouds and thick darkness. I will bring them out from the peoples and gather them from the countries, and will bring them into their own land; and I will feed them on the mountains of Israel, by the watercourses, and in all the inhabited parts of the land. I will feed them with good pasture, and the mountain heights of Israel shall be their pasture; there they shall lie down in good grazing land, and they shall feed on rich pasture on the mountains of Israel. I myself will be the shepherd of my sheep, and I will make them lie down, says the Lord God. I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the strayed, and I will bind up the injured, and I will strengthen the weak, but the fat and the strong I will destroy. I will feed them with justice.   (Ezekiel 34:11-16)

Jesus is not only Shepherd for his sheep, he is also the judge of false rulers and leaders. Before he can establish his millennial reign on the earth he must establish justice on the earth. From Revelation we read:

Then I saw heaven opened, and there was a white horse! Its rider is called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he judges and makes war. His eyes are like a flame of fire, and on his head are many diadems; and he has a name inscribed that no one knows but himself. He is clothed in a robe dipped in blood, and his name is called The Word of God. And the armies of heaven, wearing fine linen, white and pure, were following him on white horses. From his mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations, and he will rule them with a rod of iron; he will tread the wine press of the fury of the wrath of God the Almighty.  On his robe and on his thigh he has a name inscribed, “King of kings and Lord of lords.”   (Revelation 19:11-16)

As his sheep we must help our Shepherd. He is the Good Shepherd, but we are his under-shepherds. When Jesus restored his disciple Peter he asked him a question:

A second time he said to him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.”   (John 21:16-17)

The Shepherd King is all about caring for the sheep. That must be our mission as well. Jesus had stated that our treatment of others will largely determine whether we are sheep or goats:

Then he will say to those at his left hand, ‘You that are accursed, depart from me into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”   (Matthew 25:41-46)

Is Jesus our shepherd? Are we his sheep?

This age is rapidly fading. The old kingships are under judgment. Look around and see. Soon the millennial of our Lord Jesus will begin, as soon as the old is swept away. Where will we stand. Jesus is looking for under-shepherds in his reign. He is looking for those who worship and serve him alone.

Come, let us sing to the Lord;
let us shout for joy to the Rock of our salvation.

Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving
and raise a loud shout to him with psalms.

For the Lord is a great God,
and a great King above all gods.

In his hand are the caverns of the earth,
and the heights of the hills are his also.

The sea is his, for he made it,
and his hands have molded the dry land.

Come, let us bow down, and bend the knee,
and kneel before the Lord our Maker.

For he is our God,
and we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand.   (Psalm 95:1-7a)

If we are worrying about qualifying for the millennial then we do not know Jesus. He is the one who qualifies:

Now may the God of peace, who brought back from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, make you complete in everything good so that you may do his will, working among us that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be the glory forever and ever. Amen.   (Hebrews 13:20-21)

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Filed under Christ the King, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year A

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 23A

Track 1: Interceding for the Nation

Exodus 32:1-14
Psalm 106:1-6, 19-23
Philippians 4:1-9
Matthew 22:1-14

Back to the wilderness, we pick up where we left off. Moses is up on the mountain with God when God reveals to him the sin of the people:

The Lord said to Moses, “Go down at once! Your people, whom you brought up out of the land of Egypt, have acted perversely; they have been quick to turn aside from the way that I commanded them; they have cast for themselves an image of a calf, and have worshiped it and sacrificed to it, and said, ‘These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt! The Lord said to Moses, “I have seen this people, how stiff-necked they are. Now let me alone, so that my wrath may burn hot against them and I may consume them; and of you I will make a great nation.”   (Exodus 32:7-10)

Fortunately for Israel Moses was able to dissuade God from what he wanted to do. The psalmist extolls the importance of Moses as an intercessor for Israel:

Israel made a bull-calf at Horeb
and worshiped a molten image;

And so they exchanged their Glory
for the image of an ox that feeds on grass.

They forgot God their Savior,
who had done great things in Egypt,

Wonderful deeds in the land of Ham,
and fearful things at the Red Sea.

So he would have destroyed them,
had not Moses his chosen stood before him in the breach,
to turn away his wrath from consuming them.   (Psalm 106:19-23)

[O America, how much your intercessors have provided covering for your idolatry!]

The psalmist also hints at the underlying cause of Israel’s idolatry. The people forgot who they were. They were made in the image of God and did not come from other forms of life. Now they were acting like a godless nation. They also forgot who brought them out of Egypt. How could they go so wrong so quickly? The answer lies in today’s reading from Exodus:

When the people saw that Moses delayed to come down from the mountain, the people gathered around Aaron, and said to him, “Come, make gods for us, who shall go before us; as for this Moses, the man who brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.”   ()

God sometimes delays what he is going to do in order to test our faith. Do we have faith in him in all circumstances, or do the circumstances overcome our faith? The Apostle Paul wrote:

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 4:4-7)

Though we may not always be aware of it, God is near. He is with us. He is Emmanuel. Paul is suggesting that prayer will keep us from despair. If we lose faith, we are in danger of going back to our old idolatries and familiar spirits. What have these ever accomplished for us? They only lead us further astray without providing any lasting satisfaction or peace.

The Apostle Paul reminds us that there is spiritual exercise we can do while we wait upon the Lord. We can count our blessings:

Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.   (Philippians 4:8-9))

Perhaps it is time to turn off the 24 hour news cycle. Perhaps it is time to focus on what is good. Let us not so easily give up the lessons and wisdom which God has imparted to us. As Christians, the world is looking to us for hope and light, whether people realize it or not. We are the salt of the earth. It is no time to lose our savor.

We are living in the last days. Jesus told the parable about the wedding banquet. Many were invited but were distracted by the cares of this world. Then there was the guest who made it in the door but was later thrown out because he was not wearing a wedding garment. Is that not the casual Christian who does not understand the requirements of living for Christ? Is that any of us here today?

 

 

Track 2: The Wedding Garment

Isaiah 25:1-9
Psalm 23
Philippians 4:1-9
Matthew 22:1-14

The Prophet Isaiah was also a psalmist. Today we read one of his eschatological psalms. He writes about a feast that will be celebrated at some time in the future, presumably in Jerusalem:

On this mountain the Lord of hosts will make for all peoples
a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wines,
of rich food filled with marrow, of well-aged wines strained clear.

And he will destroy on this mountain
the shroud that is cast over all peoples,
the sheet that is spread over all nations;
he will swallow up death forever.

Then the Lord God will wipe away the tears from all faces,
and the disgrace of his people he will take away from all the earth,
for the Lord has spoken.   (Isaiah 25:6-8)

Isaiah writes about a time when death will no longer be a factor. This sounds very much like a celebration of the millennial reign of Jesus. As Christians we should be waiting in expectation for this prophecy to be fulfilled. Those who are waiting for this event are, according to the prophet, will be the ones in attendance:

It will be said on that day, Lo, this is our God; we have waited for him, so that he might save us.
This is the Lord for whom we have waited;
let us be glad and rejoice in his salvation.   Isaiah 25:9)

Jesus tells a parable in today’s Gospel reading which highlights this very same theme:

Once more Jesus spoke to the people in parables, saying: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding banquet for his son. He sent his slaves to call those who had been invited to the wedding banquet, but they would not come. Again he sent other slaves, saying, ‘Tell those who have been invited: Look, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready; come to the wedding banquet.’ But they made light of it and went away, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his slaves, mistreated them, and killed them. The king was enraged. He sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his slaves, ‘The wedding is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore into the main streets, and invite everyone you find to the wedding banquet.’ Those slaves went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both good and bad; so the wedding hall was filled with guests.   (Matthew 22:1-10)

Notice who the guests were – ordinary people, both good and bad. God calls all who will listen. He is no respecter of persons. The people who would not come were too occupied with worldly cares. Some were even hostile to the point of killing those servants who were offering the invitation. This is very much the day in which we are living. The culture is now hostile to Christians.

Where do we stand today? Are we waiting for the return of our Lord Jesus with great expectation? This is not the time for being a causal or nominal Christian. There may be those who think that they have had their ticket punched. They are members of a church. They have been baptized. Of this group, there are those who thought they had a license to live however they liked without consequences. The parable addresses their condition at its conclusion:

“But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing a wedding robe, and he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding robe?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”   (Matthew 22:11-14)

Everyone is called by God for the messianic banquet. Not everyone is listening. Some hear the invitation but are distracted by other things more important to them. Some do not want an invitation because they are at odds with God. While still others believe they can get in the door at the last minute with the least amount of commitment. Jesus has provided us a robe of righteousness, but we must wear it.

The true Christian will be waiting with great expectation out of love for the Lord of hosts:

It will be said on that day, Lo, this is our God; we have waited for him, so that he might save us.
This is the Lord for whom we have waited;
let us be glad and rejoice in his salvation.   (Isaiah 25:-9)

Is that true of us?

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Labor Day

pottery1The Dignity of Work 

Ecclesiasticus 38:27-32a
Psalm 107:1-9 or Psalm 90:1-2, 16-17
1 Corinthians 3:10-14
Matthew 6:19-24

God is our creator. He is the master craftsman of the universe. We are made in his image. Thus, a large part of our life on earth is the discovery of the God-given talent and creativity which he has placed within us, This discovery gives us joy but also contributes to the wellbeing of others.

King Solomon wrote about the skills of the potter:

He molds the clay with his arm and makes it pliable with his feet; he sets his heart to finish the glazing, and he takes care in firing the kiln. All these rely on their hands, and all are skillful in their own work. Without them no city can be inhabited, and wherever they live, they will not go hungry.   (Ecclesiasticus 38:29-32)

We are familiar with King Solomon. He was the wisest and the most wealthy ruler of his time, or perhaps any time. Yet, Solomon found that all that material wealth was “vanity and striving after wind.” It did not satisfy. Again he wrote:

So I saw that there is nothing better than that all should enjoy their work, for that is their lot; who can bring them to see what will be after them? (Ecclesiastes 3:22)

This Labor Day let us pause and rest. But let us also enjoy and appreciate our work and that of others. Any type of work is honorable. If we are still on the discovery to find our God-given vocation, we should not give us. God is with us. The psalmist wrote:

May the graciousness of the LORD our God be upon us; prosper the work of our hands; prosper our handiwork.   (Psalm 90:17)

There is great dignity in any kind of work. All work if for the betterment of society. To not work is a drag on society and on others. The Ap0stle Paul warned:

For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, and we did not eat anyone’s bread without paying for it; but with toil and labor we worked night and day, so that we might not burden any of you. This was not because we do not have that right, but in order to give you an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: Anyone unwilling to work should not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work.   (2 Thessalonians 3:7-11)

While on the earth Jesus never stopped working:

“My Father is still working, and I also am working.”   (John 5:17)
We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”   (John 9:4-5)
We need to follow his example. Soon the darkness will come upon us. We want to be working up to that day in the Kingdom of God. Then we will be prepared to work for him in his millennial reign.
Today, let us pause and give thanks for all our workers and citizen saints who keep us going. Let us also pray for better days ahead.

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