Tag Archives: Millennial Reign

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 28C

Track 1: The Peaceable Kingdom

Isaiah 65:17-25
Canticle 9
2 Thessalonians 3:6-13
Luke 21:5-19

God has promised us blessings far beyond this world. We read in the Book of Isaiah:

For I am about to create new heavens
and a new earth;
the former things shall not be remembered
or come to mind.
But be glad and rejoice forever
in what I am creating;
for I am about to create Jerusalem as a joy,
and its people as a delight.   (Isaiah 65:17-18)

The new earth prophesied by Isaiah stands out in stark contrast to our current earth:

No more shall there be in it
an infant that lives but a few days,
or an old person who does not live out a lifetime;
for one who dies at a hundred years will be considered a youth,
and one who falls short of a hundred will be considered accursed.
They shall build houses and inhabit them;
they shall plant vineyards and eat their fruit.
They shall not build and another inhabit;
they shall not plant and another eat;
for like the days of a tree shall the days of my people be,
and my chosen shall long enjoy the work of their hands.
They shall not labor in vain,
or bear children for calamity;
for they shall be offspring blessed by the Lord —
and their descendants as well.   (Isaiah 65:20-23)

We know that our current life on earth falls far short of what we can imagine that it should be. There must be a better life coming. This longing opens a door to potential deception. Governments, politician, and even certain churches tells us that if we follow them, we will have a utopia on earth. Do we believe them?

The Apostle Paul writes that we should set aside this notion:

I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory about to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the children of God; for the creation was subjected to futility, not of its own will but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to decay and will obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. We know that the whole creation has been groaning in labor pains until now; and not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly while we wait for adoption, the redemption of our bodies.  (Romans 8:18-23)

We are under the bondage of decay because of our disobedience to God. Only God can set us free. His promise to us is that he will. Are we ready for his peaceful kingdom?

Isaiah prophesied:

The wolf and the lamb shall feed together,
the lion shall eat straw like the ox;
but the serpent—its food shall be dust!
They shall not hurt or destroy
on all my holy mountain,
says the Lord.   (Isaiah 65:25)

The Peaceful Kingdom or political utopia? One of these is a lie. If we are talking about this present age without the intervention of God, then we will see no peace. This does not stop people from promising peace if we do what they say. Though the false promises have never worked, it has not stopped politicians from making them.

It is not just the politicians who are making false promises. Many churches are preaching Dominion Theology – that is to say that Christians will have power and authority over all aspects of life. This supposedly will occur before the second coming of Jesus.

Jesus did not forecast this to happen. In fact, it is just the opposite. From the Gospel of Matthew:

“Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.

For I have come to set a man against his father,
and a daughter against her mother,
and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law;
and one’s foes will be members of one’s own household.”   (Matthew 10:34-36)

From today’s Gospel reading in Luke:

When some were speaking about the temple, how it was adorned with beautiful stones and gifts dedicated to God, Jesus said, “As for these things that you see, the days will come when not one stone will be left upon another; all will be thrown down.”

They asked him, “Teacher, when will this be, and what will be the sign that this is about to take place?” And he said, “Beware that you are not led astray; for many will come in my name and say, `I am he!’ and, `The time is near!’ Do not go after them.

“When you hear of wars and insurrections, do not be terrified; for these things must take place first, but the end will not follow immediately.” Then he said to them, “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and plagues; and there will be dreadful portents and great signs from heaven.   (Luke 21:5-11)

In the last age we will see these things take place. In fact, they are already taking place.

“But before all this occurs, they will arrest you and persecute you; they will hand you over to synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors because of my name. This will give you an opportunity to testify. So make up your minds not to prepare your defense in advance; for I will give you words and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to withstand or contradict. You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, by relatives and friends; and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your souls.”   (Luke 21:12-19)

The poem of William Alexander Percy, written in 1924, contains these lines:

The peace of God, it is no peace,
But strife closed in the sod,
Yet, brothers, pray for but one thing–
The marvelous peace of God.

This marvelous peace will only occur in the Millennial Reign of Christ. If we are to participate in this peace we must first participate in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. We will be betrayed. Are we prepared to be hated? Will we be silenced because of our so-called hate speech? Or will we endure to the end and gain our souls? We will endure, but only if we are embracing the Lord Jesus. He is embracing us if we let him. And he will see us through in this age. And in the age to come we will rule with him in his Peaceable Kingdom on earth.

 

 

Track 2: Not One Stone Will Be Left upon Another

Malachi 4:1-2a
Psalm 98
2 Thessalonians 3:6-13
Luke 21:5-19

The temple in Jerusalem was the hub of Jewish life. Everything in Judaism was centered around the temple. The temple was, for the Jewish people, the house of God. It represented God to the Jewish people. How devastating it must have been for the disciples of Jesus to hear about its coming destruction.

From today’s Gospel in Luke:

When some were speaking about the temple, how it was adorned with beautiful stones and gifts dedicated to God, Jesus said, “As for these things that you see, the days will come when not one stone will be left upon another; all will be thrown down.”   (Luke 21:5-6)

The thinking must have been that if we have the actual house of God in our midst then we must have God himself as well. The temple legitimized the Jewish people, their traditions and way of life.

We remember how God spoke through the Prophet Jeremiah:

Stand in the gate of the Lord’s house, and proclaim there this word, and say, Hear the word of the Lord, all you people of Judah, you that enter these gates to worship the Lord. Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Amend your ways and your doings, and let me dwell with you in this place. Do not trust in these deceptive words: “This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.”   (Jeremiah 7:1-4)

The temple of of the Lord did not legitimize anything. God was not married to the temple. He was not the God of a building. He was God of a chosen people. Before Jerusalem, Shiloh had represented God. God told Jeremiah:

Go now to my place that was in Shiloh, where I made my name dwell at first, and see what I did to it for the wickedness of my people Israel. And now, because you have done all these things, says the Lord, and when I spoke to you persistently, you did not listen, and when I called you, you did not answer, therefore I will do to the house that is called by my name, in which you trust, and to the place that I gave to you and to your ancestors, just what I did to Shiloh. And I will cast you out of my sight, just as I cast out all your kinsfolk, all the offspring of Ephraim.   (Jeremiah 7:11-15)

Did the Jews trust in only a buiding? Do we trust in a building? Do we trust in an institution? Institutions fail. Institutions can become corrupted. Can churches become corrupt?

If our hope is in an institution or in even a church, how secure are we? In today’s Old Testament reading we are warned that anything that works against the righteousness of God will ultimately be destroyed:

See, the day is coming, burning like an oven, when all the arrogant and all evildoers will be stubble; the day that comes shall burn them up, says the Lord of hosts, so that it will leave them neither root nor branch. But for you who revere my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings.   (Malachi 4:1-2a)

The Lord Jesus Christ himself is our savior. The psalmist wrote:

Sing to the Lord a new song,
for he has done marvelous things.

With his right hand and his holy arm
has he won for himself the victory.

The Lord has made known his victory;
his righteousness has he openly shown in the sight of the nations.   (Psalm 98:1-3)

Jesus has won the victory for us – not an institution, not even a church. He alone is our salvation for all who put their trust in him. He is our temple.

The Apostle John had a revelation of the Temple of God:

I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it. Its gates will never be shut by day — and there will be no night there. People will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations. But nothing unclean will enter it, nor anyone who practices abomination or falsehood, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s book of life.   (Revelation 21:22-27)

Amen.

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All Saints’ Day, Year C

Get Ready for Battle

Daniel 7:1-3,15-18
Psalm 149
Ephesians 1:11-23
Luke 6:20-31

The Prophet Daniel was a great intercessor f0r his people. He was carried away into Babylon where he continually prayed for the future of Israel. In today’s Old Testament reading, Daniel speaks of a dream he had about the future. Four empires would rise on the earth before the end times:

In the first year of King Belshazzar of Babylon, Daniel had a dream and visions of his head as he lay in bed. Then he wrote down the dream: I, Daniel, saw in my vision by night the four winds of heaven stirring up the great sea, and four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another.

As for me, Daniel, my spirit was troubled within me, and the visions of my head terrified me. I approached one of the attendants to ask him the truth concerning all this. So he said that he would disclose to me the interpretation of the matter: “As for these four great beasts, four kings shall arise out of the earth. But the holy ones of the Most High shall receive the kingdom and possess the kingdom for ever—for ever and ever.”   (Daniel 7:1-3,15-18)

The message to Daniel was clear. Even though there would be a succession of four secular dynasties on the earth, the final ruler would be the Lord himself along with his holy followers.

Satan, of course, is aware of this plan. He has made every close follower of Jesus a target. Jesus speaks of this in his beatitudes in the Gospel of Luke:

“Blessed are you when people hate you, and when they exclude you, revile you, and defame you on account of the Son of Man. Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, for surely your reward is great in heaven; for that is what their ancestors did to the prophets.”   (Luke 6:22-23)

“Woe to you when all speak well of you, for that is what their ancestors did to the false prophets.

“But I say to you that listen, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. If anyone strikes you on the cheek, offer the other also; and from anyone who takes away your coat do not withhold even your shirt. Give to everyone who begs from you; and if anyone takes away your goods, do not ask for them again. Do to others as you would have them do to you.   (Luke 6:26-31)

We are in a battle against the forces of evil. But our weapons are not the same as theirs. The Apostle Paul wrote to the Church at Conrinth:

I, Paul, am the one you call “shy” when I am face to face with you. But when I am away from you, you think I am “bold” toward you. I am coming to see you. Please don’t make me be as bold as I expect to be toward some people. They think that I live the way the people of this world live. I do live in the world. But I don’t fight my battles the way the people of the world do. The weapons I fight with are not the weapons the world uses. In fact, it is just the opposite. My weapons have the power of God to destroy the camps of the enemy.   (2 Corinthians 10:2-4)

What power is Paul writing about? The people of God are given ultimate authority over the dark forces in this world. Our weapon is a two-edged sword. This sword is the word of God. We read about it in the Book of Revelation. The Apostle John had a vision:

Then I turned to see whose voice it was that spoke to me, and on turning I saw seven golden lampstands, and in the midst of the lampstands I saw one like the Son of Man, clothed with a long robe and with a golden sash across his chest. His head and his hair were white as white wool, white as snow; his eyes were like a flame of fire, his feet were like burnished bronze, refined as in a furnace, and his voice was like the sound of many waters. In his right hand he held seven stars, and from his mouth came a sharp, two-edged sword, and his face was like the sun shining with full force.   (Revelation 1:12-16)

This sword is the word of God. The author of the Book of Hebrews writes:

Indeed, the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing until it divides soul from spirit, joints from marrow; it is able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And before him no creature is hidden, but all are naked and laid bare to the eyes of the one to whom we must render an account.   (Hebrews 4:12-13)

As disciples we have access to this sharp, two-edged sword, Paul writes in today’s Epistle reading:

I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power. God put this power to work in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and above every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the age to come. And he has put all things under his feet and has made him the head over all things for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all.   (Ephesians 1:17-23)

Are we ready for battle? Are we ready use this sword of the Spirt? The Church has too often been silent and not spoken out against the evil of this world. God is challenging us today:

Take up the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to withstand on that evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm. Stand therefore, and fasten the belt of truth around your waist, and put on the breastplate of righteousness. As shoes for your feet put on whatever will make you ready to proclaim the gospel of peace. With all of these, take the shield of faith, with which you will be able to quench all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.   (Ephesians 6:13-17)

If we are to reign with Christ then we must learn to fight as Christ fights. We must take up the sword of the Spirit. We must speak the word of God boldly and not shrink back. Darkness can no longer hide the evil of this world when we speak the truth of God’s word. The world will say that we are using “hate speech.” What is hateful is Satan’s plan  to keep people in the dark. People are desperate for the truth.

The psalmist wrote:

Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;
let them be joyful on their beds.

Let the praises of God be in their throat
and a two-edged sword in their hand;

To wreak vengeance on the nations
and punishment on the peoples;

To bind their kings in chains
and their nobles with links of iron;

To inflict on them the judgment decreed;
this is glory for all his faithful people.
Hallelujah!   (Psalm 149:5-9)

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Labor Day

The Dignity of Work 

Ecclesiasticus 38:27-32a
Psalm 107:1-9 or Psalm 90:1-2, 16-17
1 Corinthians 3:10-14
Matthew 6:19-24

God is our creator. He is the master craftsman of the universe. We are made in his image. Thus, a large part of our life on earth is the discovery of the God-given talent and creativity which he has placed within us. This discovery gives us joy but also contributes to the wellbeing of others.

King Solomon wrote about the skills of the potter:

He molds the clay with his arm and makes it pliable with his feet; he sets his heart to finish the glazing, and he takes care in firing the kiln. All these rely on their hands, and all are skillful in their own work. Without them no city can be inhabited, and wherever they live, they will not go hungry.   (Ecclesiasticus 38:29-32)

We are familiar with King Solomon. He was the wisest and the most wealthy ruler of his time, or perhaps of any time. Yet, Solomon found that all that material wealth was “vanity and striving after wind.” It did not satisfy. Again he wrote:

So I saw that there is nothing better than that all should enjoy their work, for that is their lot; who can bring them to see what will be after them? (Ecclesiastes 3:22)

Solomon was saving the our work itself should provide us satisfaction. The doing is more rewarding than the wages and what they can provide. Thus, whatever we do, let us do it unto the Lord, offering him praise and thanksgiving.

This Labor Day let us pause and rest. But let us also enjoy and appreciate our work and that of others. If we are still on the discovery to find our God-given vocation, we should not give us. God is with us. The psalmist wrote:

May the graciousness of the LORD our God be upon us; prosper the work of our hands; prosper our handiwork.   (Psalm 90:17)

There is great dignity in any kind of work. All work if for the betterment of society. To not work is a drag on society and on others. The Apostle Paul warned:

For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, and we did not eat anyone’s bread without paying for it; but with toil and labor we worked night and day, so that we might not burden any of you. This was not because we do not have that right, but in order to give you an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: Anyone unwilling to work should not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work.   (2 Thessalonians 3:7-11)

While on the earth Jesus never stopped working:

“My Father is still working, and I also am working.”   (John 5:17)
We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”   (John 9:4-5)
We need to follow his example. Soon the darkness will come upon us. We want to be working up to that day in the Kingdom of God. Then we will be prepared to work for him in his millennial reign.
Today, let us pause and give thanks for all our workers and citizen saints who keep us going.

 

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