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Day of Pentecost

I Will Pour out My Spirit on All Flesh

Today we celebrate the birth of the Church. We mark it as an historical event, and that it is – very significant one. Reading from Acts 2:

When the day of Pentecost had come, the disciples were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.   (Acts 2:1-4)

Clearly something supernaturally was happening. The Apostle Peter began preaching concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus. He ended up by saying:

Therefore let the entire house of Israel know with certainty that God has made him both Lord and Messiah, this Jesus whom you crucified.”   (Acts 2:36)

Many of Peter’s listeners was moved by the Spirit:

Now when they heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and to the other apostles, “Brothers, what should we do?” Peter said to them, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is for you, for your children, and for all who are far away, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to him.”    (Acts 2:37-39)

Peter said the promise was for his listeners, but also for those who are far away. What was the promise? Peter quoted the Prophet Joel:

In the last days it will be, God declares,

that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,
and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,

and your young men shall see visions,
and your old men shall dream dreams.

Even upon my slaves, both men and women,
in those days I will pour out my Spirit;
and they shall prophesy.   (Acts 2:17-18)

The promise was the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. Was this a onetime experience? Not in the Early Church. We read in the Book of Acts that the apostles were arrested for performing a healing by the Holy Spirit. When they were later released they gathered for prayer:

When they had prayed, the place in which they were gathered together was shaken; and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke the word of God with boldness.   (Acts 4:31)

There were manifestations of the outpouring of the Spirit, both on the Day of Pentecost and throughout the the buddEarly Church. The Apostle wrote about them to the Church in Corinth:

Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of services, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who activates all of them in everyone. To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good. To one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the discernment of spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. All these are activated by one and the same Spirit, who allots to each one individually just as the Spirit chooses.   (1 Corinthians 12:4-11)

But this was the Apostolic Age, some might say. It is not for today. Is the Holy Spirit doctrinal or dynamic? Jesus told Nicodemus :

The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”   (John 3:8)

The Spirit is like the wind. Is it under our control” No, the wind blows where it chooses.

Let us look at an Old Testament outpouring of the Spirit. God asks Moses to gather 70 elders and bring them to the tent of meeting:

So Moses went out and told the people the words of the Lord; and he gathered seventy elders of the people, and placed them all around the tent. 25 Then the Lord came down in the cloud and spoke to him, and took some of the spirit that was on him and put it on the seventy elders; and when the spirit rested upon them, they prophesied. But they did not do so again.   (Numbers 11:24-25)

The tent of meeting was not the only place where this outpouring occurred, however:

Two men remained in the camp, one named Eldad, and the other named Medad, and the spirit rested on them; they were among those registered, but they had not gone out to the tent, and so they prophesied in the camp. And a young man ran and told Moses, “Eldad and Medad are prophesying in the camp.” And Joshua son of Nun, the assistant of Moses, one of his chosen men, said, “My lord Moses, stop them!” But Moses said to him, “Are you jealous for my sake? Would that all the Lord‘s people were prophets, and that the Lord would put his spirit on them!”   (Numbers 11:26-30)

Do we have any Eldad’s and Medad’s in our churches today? Joshua thought they were not allowed in his day. They did not follow protocol. Does the spirit follow our protocol or does our protocol follow the Spirit? As ministers of the Gospel are we free to say, along with Moses: “Would that all the Lord‘s people were prophets, and that the Lord would put his spirit on them!” ?

Jesus spelled out the protocol:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water.” Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive; for as yet there was no Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified.   (John 7:37-39)

Jesus was glorified on the cross. He paid a great price so that we could receive the Holy Spirit. Are we thirsty?

This Sunday we celebrate an historical event. We celebrate the birth of the Church. Let us also celebrate an outpouring of the Holy Spirit today and pray for a rebirth of the Church as we welcome the Spirit into our own hearts. God has not finished with us yet. That should not keep us from celebrating Jesus’s victory over the cross, the grave, and Hell. God wants to wash over us and release in us a spring of living water.

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Third Sunday in Lent

Living Water

Today we have the familiar story, found only in the Gospel of John, of Jesus and the Samaritan woman. Jesus is tired from his journey. He encounters the woman while he is sitting down by a well:

A Samaritan woman came to draw water, and Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” (His disciples had gone to the city to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask a drink of me, a woman of Samaria?” (Jews do not share things in common with Samaritans.) Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” The woman said to him, “Sir, you have no bucket, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? Are you greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us the well, and with his sons and his flocks drank from it?” Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but those who drink of the water that I will give them will never be thirsty. The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.” The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water, so that I may never be thirsty or have to keep coming here to draw water.”   (John 4: 7-15)

So much can be said about this event. The first sermon I ever preached was about Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well. Each time I read this portion of John I see something new. This time I see a woman who is tired from her daily grind. The water jar was heavy and the well was very deep. She had to continually come back to the well to draw water. And to top it all off, she is bothered by this Jewish man who was interrupting her by asking a favor. Why was he even talking to her. After all, Jews did not normally even deal with Samaritans.

At times we may feel exhausted. We have been pushed beyond our limits? This is how the children of Israel must have felt. They thought they were stuck in a desert with no future. They were going to die for lack of water:

The people quarreled with Moses, and said, “Give us water to drink.” Moses said to them, “Why do you quarrel with me? Why do you test the Lord?” But the people thirsted there for water; and the people complained against Moses and said, “Why did you bring us out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and livestock with thirst?” So Moses cried out to the Lord, “What shall I do with this people? They are almost ready to stone me.” The Lord said to Moses, “Go on ahead of the people, and take some of the elders of Israel with you; take in your hand the staff with which you struck the Nile, and go. I will be standing there in front of you on the rock at Horeb. Strike the rock, and water will come out of it, so that the people may drink.” Moses did so, in the sight of the elders of Israel.    (Exodus 17:2-6)

What happened to belief in the promises of God? God has shown them signs and wonders. They had left Egypt without a sick person among them. But now they were lost and abandoned by God. Do any of us fit that category?

We need food and drink. Indeed, but life teaches us that we need more. Jesus was talking about a supernatural supply he called of living water? He is the living water. Just as Moses struck the rock at mountain of God. God, the Father, would strike him. He is our rock and our fortress. But he was wounded for our transgressions.

Jesus would soon face the cross. He was in Jerusalem, celebrating the Festival of Booths. Reading from John 6:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water.’”  Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive; for as yet there was no Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified.   (John 7:37-39)

Jesus would pour out his Spirit into our hearts. We would be given living water. Our hearts would become a reservoir of supernatural supply. But first he had to be glorified on the cross to atone for all our sins.

Have we been filled by Jesus or are we letting religion get in the way? When Jesus gently confronted the Samaritan w0man concerning her sin, this is how the conversation went:

Jesus said to her, “Go, call your husband, and come back.” The woman answered him, “I have no husband.” Jesus said to her, “You are right in saying, ‘I have no husband’; for you have had five husbands, and the one you have now is not your husband. What you have said is true!” The woman said to him, “Sir, I see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you say that the place where people must worship is in Jerusalem.” Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father seeks such as these to worship him. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.”   (John 4:16-24)

The woman first retreat to religion. Does she cling to it in defense? Without our traditions we are free to look at the deep truths of God. Fortunately she raised her heartfelt question:

The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming” (who is called Christ). “When he comes, he will proclaim all things to us.” Jesus said to her, “I am he, the one who is speaking to you.”   (John 4:25-26)

Where do we stand today? Have we runout of our own resources? If so we have an alternative. Jesus said to the Samaritan woman:

“If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.”   (John 4:10)

Do we know about the gift of the Holy Spirit? If so, have we asked Jesus? Perhaps we have, but let us keep asking him. Jesus is the giver of the gift. In this gift we find the rest we are looking for us. Indeed, it will be in us a spring of water gushing up to eternal life. The psalmist wrote:

Harden not your hearts,
as your forebears did in the wilderness,
at Meribah, and on that day at Massah,
when they tempted me.

They put me to the test,
though they had seen my works.

Forty years long I detested that generation and said,
“This people are wayward in their hearts;
they do not know my ways.”

So I swore in my wrath,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”   (Psalm 95:8-11)

God wants us to enter into his rest today, and every day. Thanks be to God who gives us living water through Christ our Lord.

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The Baptism of Our Lord

Fulfilling All Righteousness

In the Season of Epiphany, the baptism of our Lord Jesus stands out as the epiphany of the epiphanies. It reveals both the identity of Jesus and his mission. Reading from today’s Gospel of Matthew:

Jesus came from Galilee to John at the Jordan, to be baptized by him. John would have prevented him, saying, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” But Jesus answered him, “Let it be so now; for it is proper for us in this way to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he consented. And when Jesus had been baptized, just as he came up from the water, suddenly the heavens were opened to him and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting on him. And a voice from heaven said, “This is my Son, the Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.”   (Matthew 3:13-17)

John understood who Jesus was and his mission. Jesus is the Messiah. He is one who would baptize with the Holy Spirit and with fire. Why would Jesus have to undergo John’s baptism of water? Jesus provides the answer:

“Let it be so now; for it is proper for us in this way to fulfill all righteousness.”

What did Jesus mean? God the Father wanted to make all of us righteous as he is righteous. The baptism of Jesus is very much a part of his plan. Let us see how.

Jesus needed to be baptized as an example for us, but he also the anointing of the Holy Spirit to carry on his ministry on earth. We have to understand that when Jesus was borne of a woman he was fully human. He had given up all of his divinity and position in heaven. We read from Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians that Jesus:

though he was in the form oaf God,
    did not regard equality with God
    as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
    taking the form of a slave,
    being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
    he humbled himself
    and became obedient to the point of death—
    even death on a cross.   (Philippians 2:6-8)

Jesus needed the power of the Holy Spirit. He needed to understand fully God’s word. All of his miracles and teaching came from the Father through the Spirit. He needed the guidance of the Spirit.

If Jesus was like us in every way, except that he did not sin, how much more must we need to receive the same baptism that Jesus did? We need the Holy Spirit to guide us into holy living. We cannot be righteous on our own effort. We with the power and direction of the Spirit. We need the baptism with the Holy Sprit and with the fire of God to burn away our dross.

How do we then, receive this baptism. We need Jesus, himself, to be the one who baptizes us. Jesus spoke of this in the Gospel of John when he met the Samaritan woman at the well. Remember, she had questioned him why he would ask her for a drink of water because Jews did not associate with Samaritans. Jesus answered her:

If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” The woman said to him, “Sir, you have no bucket, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? Are you greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us the well, and with his sons and his flocks drank from it?” Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but those who drink of the water that I will give them will never be thirsty. The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.”   (John 4:10-14) 

What is this living water. Jesus further explains in John chapter seven:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart[l] shall flow rivers of living water.’” Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive; for as yet there was no Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified.   (John 7:37-39)

In order for God to pour out his Spirit on all flesh, sin had to be dealt with. Jesus removed all of our sins with his sacrifice on the cross. We simply have to believe that he did. There is another step, however, We need to submit to Jesus. We need the baptism with the Holy Spirit that only Jesus can provide. He, alone, is the baptizer with the Holy Spirit and with fire.

The psalmist wrote:

The Lord sits enthroned above the flood;
the Lord sits enthroned as King for evermore.

The Lord shall give strength to his people;
the Lord shall give his people the blessing of peace.   (Psalm 29:10-11)

Are we ready for the flood of living water? It is required to fulfill all righteousness. Let us ask Jesus to baptize us with the Spirt. Let us ask him daily. Jesus says to  us:

“If you know the gift of God, and who I am,’ you will ask me and I will give you living water.”

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Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year C

The Water of Life

Who are we following today? There are many voices promising many things, but can they deliver? And what do they actually have to give? There is only one person who can deliver eternal life. Are we listening to his voice? The Pharisees and scribes were not:

The Jews gathered around him and said to him, “How long will you keep us in suspense? If you are the Messiah, tell us plainly.” Jesus answered, “I have told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in my Father’s name testify to me; but you do not believe, because you do not belong to my sheep. My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of my hand.   (John 10:24-28)

The shepherd boy who wrote this psalm listened to the voice of shepherd greater than him. David said:

The Lord is my shepherd;
I shall not be in want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures
and leads me beside still waters.

He revives my soul
and guides me along right pathways for his Name’s sake.   (Psalm 23:1-3)

Who is our shepherd? Whose voice are we listening to? There is only one voice that gives a drink from the water or like. Are we thirsty for this gift? John, the revelator writes:

Then one of the elders addressed me, saying, “Who are these, robed in white, and where have they come from?” I said to him, “Sir, you are the one that knows.” Then he said to me, “These are they who have come out of the great ordeal; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.

For this reason they are before the throne of God,
and worship him day and night within his temple,
and the one who is seated on the throne will shelter them.

They will hunger no more, and thirst no more;
the sun will not strike them,
nor any scorching heat;

for the Lamb at the center of the throne will be their shepherd,
and he will guide them to springs of the water of life,

and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes.”   (Revelation 7:13-17)

There is a gift that brings us eternal life. But we must follow the Good Shepherd. We must listen to his voice. He is the one who leads us to this gift.

We remember the encounter that Jesus had with a Samaritan woman at the well. She wonder why a Jew would be asking her to give him water because Jews did not speak with Samaritans.

Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” The woman said to him, “Sir, you have no bucket, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? Are you greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us the well, and with his sons and his flocks drank from it?” Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but those who drink of the water that I will give them will never be thirsty. The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.”   (John 4:10-14)

What is this gift that Jesus talks about? The Gospel of John tells us:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water.’” Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive; for as yet there was no Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified.   (John 7:37-39)

Jesus purchased this gift for us by his sacrifice on a cruel cross. Do we want it? If so, then we must follow the Good Shepherd. We must listen to his voice. We must follow where he leads us. We must put our full faith and trust in him.

Distracting voices with vain promises can stand in the way. One the most distracting voices is the voice of religion. We remember when Jesus confronted the woman at the well about the life she was living. She answered him this way:

The woman said to him, “Sir, I see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you say that the place where people must worship is in Jerusalem.”   (John 4:19-20)

Jesus quickly dismissed any questions about religion:

Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father seeks such as these to worship him. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming” (who is called Christ). “When he comes, he will proclaim all things to us.” Jesus said to her, “I am he, the one who is speaking to you.”   (John 4:21-26)

The woman’s conversion followed because she put religion aside and listened to the voice of the Good Shepherd. Today is the hour for us to focus on what is real and lasting. In a time of confusing voices we must learn to hear the Master’s voice. Jesus said:

My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish.   (John 10:27-28)

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