Tag Archives: Joseph

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 19A

Track 1: The Lord Has Become My Salvation

Exodus 14:19-31
Psalm 114
or
Exodus 15:1b-11,20-21
Romans 14:1-12
Matthew 18:21-35

Before the grumbling in the wilderness, there was a special time for Israel when they celebrated their victory over the Egyptians by the mighty hand of God. In Exodus we read:

I will sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously;
horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.

The Lord is my strength and my might,
and he has become my salvation;

this is my God, and I will praise him,
my father’s God, and I will exalt him.   (Exodus 15:1-2)

Do we now remember the victories of the Lord in our Lives, or are we grumbling in the wilderness of sin? Life can deal some tough blows that is for sure. We can always find excuses to grumble. What about the victories? The Apostle Paul wrote that the circumstances in life count for little when compared to the glory of the resurrection. The greatest victory that we experience in our lives is that we belong to God:

We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves. If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s. For to this end Christ died and lived again, so that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.   (Romans 14:7-9)

When we lose focus of the great triumph of the cross we tend to go back to grumbling and to judging others. Paul continued:

Why do you pass judgment on your brother or sister? Or you, why do you despise your brother or sister? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God. For it is written,

“As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me,
and every tongue shall give praise to God.”

So then, each of us will be accountable to God.   (Romans 14:10-12)

The disciple Peter wanted to know how many times he had to forgive someone, as if we should keep score:

Peter came and said to Jesus, “Lord, if another member of the church sins against me, how often should I forgive? As many as seven times?” Jesus said to him, “Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven times.

The kingdom of God is not about keeping score on others. It is not about grumbling about the conditions in our lives. It is about living for God under all circumstances. This life is temporal and will soon come to an end. Now is the time to be ever more vigilant to ready ourselves to stand before the Lord. He is coming soon. Tanks be to God. In the meantime we will walk in love with a forgiving heart.

 

 

Track 2: Bad Things Turned into Good

Genesis 50:15-21
Psalm 103:(1-7), 8-13
Romans 14:1-12
Matthew 18:21-35

There was a celebrated book written by a Jewish rabbi entitle “Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People.” The book had merit, but according to Jesus the promise was wrong. When someone called him “Good Master” he asked that person why he called him “good.” Jesus said that no one was good but the “Father” alone. (Mark 10:18)

The classic Old Testament case of bad things happening to someone who seemingly did not deserve all that happened to him was Joseph. His brothers sold him into slavery in Egypt. He was put in prison there under false accusations. We pick up on the story in today’s Old Testament reading. It was a time of great famine and only Egypt was prepared for it. God had revealed the its coming to Joseph. Joseph is now second in charge of all Egypt. All stored up food supply are under his authority.

Joseph’s brothers now have to go before him to ask for mercy and assistance in a time of great crisis. Their concern is that Joseph may exact revenge upon them. As we read from Exodus notice that the brothers now want to identify with the God of their father:

Realizing that their father was dead, Joseph’s brothers said, “What if Joseph still bears a grudge against us and pays us back in full for all the wrong that we did to him?” So they approached Joseph, saying, “Your father gave this instruction before he died, ‘Say to Joseph: I beg you, forgive the crime of your brothers and the wrong they did in harming you.’ Now therefore please forgive the crime of the servants of the God of your father.”

Joseph’s reply was unexpected:

Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today. So have no fear; I myself will provide for you and your little ones.” In this way he reassured them, speaking kindly to them.   (Genesis 50:20-21)

What empowered Joseph to be so forgiving and so generous? He looked at things from God’s perspective and not a human perspective. What was intoned for evil God used for good. This can happen when we put our trust in the Lord and not try to take matters in our own hands.

All of us need the wisdom of Joseph. Two key elements were essential in Joseph’s life: trust in God and forgiveness of those who wronged him. Without trust it is hard to forgive. With trust we can more easily forgive.

Peter realized that forgiveness was important but wanted to know the limit of forgiveness. He asked Jesus how many times he should forgive someone as if we are allowed to keep score. Before we become too hard on Peter we must search our own hearts. Jesus famous reply to Peter who wanted to know if we should forgive someone seven times:

“Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven times.   (Matthew 18:22)

Today’s psalm is the prayer of someone who seeks God’s perspective:

Bless the Lord, O my soul,
and all that is within me, bless his holy Name.

Bless the Lord, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

He forgives all your sins
and heals all your infirmities;

He redeems your life from the grave
and crowns you with mercy and loving-kindness;

He satisfies you with good things,
and your youth is renewed like an eagle’s.

Let this psalm be our prayer. It helps us to remember the goodness of God in all circumstances. As we recite that goodness we remind ourselves that God can bring good out of bad situations. After all, God has redeemed our lives from the grave and crowned us with mercy and loving-kindness.

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Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 15A

Track 1: Unity in the Body of Christ

Isaiah 56:1,6-8
Psalm 67
Romans 11:1-2a, 29-32
Matthew 15: (10-20), 21-28

The psalmist wrote:

Oh, how good and pleasant it is,
when brethren live together in unity!

It is like fine oil upon the head
that runs down upon the beard,

Upon the beard of Aaron,
and runs down upon the collar of his robe.

It is like the dew of Hermon
that falls upon the hills of Zion.

For there the Lord has ordained the blessing:
life for evermore.   (Psalm 133:1-5)

There is great blessing in unity, within the body of Christ as well as within our own lives. Unfortunately, experience tells us that coming together in unity can be most difficult.

The Apostle Paul was struggling with the problem of achieving unity within the Early Church. Paul considered himself an apostle to the Gentiles, though he was trained as a Pharisee, He received criticism from the Church in Jerusalem because his converts were not following the strict practices of Judaism. Paul attempted to explain why God does not show partiality to either Jew of Gentile:

I ask, then, has God rejected his people? By no means! I myself am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham, a member of the tribe of Benjamin. God has not rejected his people whom he foreknew.

For the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable. Just as you were once disobedient to God but have now received mercy because of their disobedience, so they have now been disobedient in order that, by the mercy shown to you, they too may now receive mercy. For God has imprisoned all in disobedience so that he may be merciful to all.   (Romans 11:1-2a, 29-32)

The key to understanding unity between brothers and sisters of the Faith is that God has shown mercy to us all. Not one of us can say that we do not need his mercy. God has forgiven us by removing our sins through the shed blood of Jesus. We have earned no status with God on our own.

Mercy and forgiveness are the building blocks of unity. Joseph of the Old Testament understood this. We remember the Joseph’s brothers had sold him into slavery in Egypt. That would have been devastating for most anyone who went from favored son to being falsely accused and thrown in prison in Egypt. Joseph held on to his trust in God and eventually this paid off. Today out of Genesis we read:

Then Joseph said to his brothers, “Come closer to me.” And they came closer. He said, “I am your brother, Joseph, whom you sold into Egypt. And now do not be distressed, or angry with yourselves, because you sold me here; for God sent me before you to preserve life. For the famine has been in the land these two years; and there are five more years in which there will be neither plowing nor harvest. God sent me before you to preserve for you a remnant on earth, and to keep alive for you many survivors. So it was not you who sent me here, but God; he has made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house and ruler over all the land of Egypt. Hurry and go up to my father and say to him, ‘Thus says your son Joseph, God has made me lord of all Egypt; come down to me, do not delay. You shall settle in the land of Goshen, and you shall be near me, you and your children and your children’s children, as well as your flocks, your herds, and all that you have. I will provide for you there—since there are five more years of famine to come—so that you and your household, and all that you have, will not come to poverty.’   (Genesis 45:4-11)

As a forerunner of Christ, Joseph forgave his brothers and showed them mercy and kindness. Thus he was able to reconcile peacefully with his brothers. But there is one other thing that we might easily overlook and that is how Joseph was able to forgive his brothers. Joseph understood how his life fit into a wider plan that God had for his people. He told his brothers: “Do not be distressed, or angry with yourselves, because you sold me here; for God sent me before you to preserve life.”

If we are to live in unity we must learn to forgive and show mercy to others as God has shown to us. But we must also see beyond our own selfish needs. We must pray ask how God is using us for the greater good, even when we are undergoing difficult circumstances. The Apostle Paul reminds us:

Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we[a] have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have obtained access[b] to this grace in which we stand; and we boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God. And not only that, but we also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.   (Romans 5:1-5)

Powerful forces are coming against the Church today, to create division and disunity. Let us reject these forces, which are of the Devil, and strive together to live in unity. It is not always so easy. However, when we do God’s blessing falls upon us. Though the struggle may be difficult, with God, all things are possible. Joseph learned this. We have the blood of Christ on our side. All the more reason for us to show love to others. Paul wrote:

Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth. It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.   (1 Corinthians 13:4-7)

 

 

Track 2: Great Is Your Faith

Genesis 45:1-15
Psalm 133
Romans 11:1-2a, 29-32
Matthew 15: (10-20), 21-28

The Apostle Paul was struggling with the problem of achieving unity within the Early Church. Paul considered himself an apostle to the Gentiles, though he was trained as a Pharisee, He received criticism from the Church in Jerusalem because his converts were not following the strict practices of Judaism. Paul attempted to explain why God does not show partiality to either Jew of Gentile:

I ask, then, has God rejected his people? By no means! I myself am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham, a member of the tribe of Benjamin. God has not rejected his people whom he foreknew.

For the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable. Just as you were once disobedient to God but have now received mercy because of their disobedience, so they have now been disobedient in order that, by the mercy shown to you, they too may now receive mercy. For God has imprisoned all in disobedience so that he may be merciful to all.   (Romans 11:1-2a, 29-32)

In today’s Gospel reading we have a curious account of a conversation Jesus had with a Canaanite woman. The woman would not have been considered as one of God’s chosen people. She was not a practicing Jew.  At first it seems as if Jesus is trying to discourage the woman but then we begin to realize that he was testing her:

Jesus left that place and went away to the district of Tyre and Sidon. Just then a Canaanite woman from that region came out and started shouting, “Have mercy on me, Lord, Son of David; my daughter is tormented by a demon.” But he did not answer her at all. And his disciples came and urged him, saying, “Send her away, for she keeps shouting after us.” He answered, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” But she came and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, help me.” He answered, “It is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.” She said, “Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” Then Jesus answered her, “Woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish.” And her daughter was healed instantly.   (Matthew 15:21-28)

The Canaanite woman was not without faith. In someways she understood more about the ministry of Jesus than did his disciples who were trying to turn her away. She was not puffed up about her status with God. Nonetheless, she felt in her heart that Jesus might show her mercy if she asked him. The truth is that God will show anyone mercy who asked. The Apostle Paul writes:

But God, who is rich in mercy, because of His great love with which He loved us, even when we were dead in trespasses, made us alive together with Christ (by grace you have been saved), and raised us up together, and made us sit together in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, that in the ages to come He might show the exceeding riches of His grace in His kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.   (Ephesians 2:4-9)

God is no respecter of persons. The Prophet Isaiah spoke:

Thus says the Lord:
Maintain justice, and do what is right,

for soon my salvation will come,
and my deliverance be revealed.

And the foreigners who join themselves to the Lord,
to minister to him, to love the name of the Lord,
and to be his servants,

all who keep the sabbath, and do not profane it,
and hold fast my covenant–

these I will bring to my holy mountain,
and make them joyful in my house of prayer;

their burnt offerings and their sacrifices
will be accepted on my altar;

for my house shall be called a house of prayer
for all peoples.   (Isaiah 56:1,6-8)

We are the foreigners joined to the Lord. We are the ingrafted branches of Judaism. Our status before God is not about what we have done for him. Rather, our status is fully based on what Jesus has done for us.

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Tenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 14A

Track 1: Why Did You Doubt?

Genesis 37:1-4, 12-28
Psalm 105, 1-6, 16-22, 45b
Romans 10:5-15
Matthew 14:22-33

Today we recall one of the great moments in the earthly ministry of Jesus:

Early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.”

Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. But when he noticed the strong wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?”   (Matthew 14:25-31)

Before we become too hard on Peter let us confess that probable none of us have ever walked on water. Jesus asked Peter: “Why did you doubt?” Why did Peter doubt at the last minute? To answer that question we must also answer: “Why do we doubt, sometimes at the last minuet?”

The strong winds and rough seas in life so easily capture our attention. The circumstances around us distract us. We lose our concentration. We quickly forget what God has done and what he is doing now. Jesus had been walking on the water, but that was not the focus of Peter now as he was sinking in the sea.

God led the children of Israel out of Egypt with many signs and wonders. He had parted the Red Sea. But when Moses went up on the mountain to be with God for forty days, the children of Israel quickly forgot what God had done for them. They made a golden calf to worship in his place. They lost their faith at the last minute so to speak.

Fortunately, when we sink into roaring seas of life Jesus does not sink with us. The psalmist reminds us:

Give thanks to the Lord and call upon his Name;
make known his deeds among the peoples.

Sing to him, sing praises to him,
and speak of all his marvelous works.

Glory in his holy Name;
let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice.

Search for the Lord and his strength;
continually seek his face.

Remember the marvels he has done,
his wonders and the judgments of his mouth,   (Psalm 105: 1-5)

Joseph could have easily lost his faith in God when his brothers sold him into slavery in Egypt. We remember that he had been given a dream in which his brothers would one day bow down to him. The psalmist goes on to remind us how this prediction came true:

Until his prediction came to pass,
the word of the Lord tested him.

The king sent and released him;
the ruler of the peoples set him free.

He set him as a master over his household,
as a ruler over all his possessions,   (Psalm 105: 19-21)

Probably very few of us will be tested in the extreme way that Joseph was tested. Nonetheless, our lives are full of tests. How do we respond? Do we forget that we serve a great God who has rescued us in the past? Do we dwell on the difficult circumstances that may surround us? Or do we look up to Jesus?

Peter was going under. He cried out to the Lord: “Save me!” Some of us need to cry out to him today. Now is the time to call upon his name, the name above all names. Now is the time to reach out to him. Now is the hour to cast all our cares upon him. Amen.

 

 

Track 2: Hiding from God

1 Kings 19:9-18
Psalm 85:8-13
Romans 10:5-15
Matthew 14:22-33

The Prophet Elijah was on the Mount of Transfiguration with Jesus and Moses. But in today’s Old Testament reading we find this same prophet hiding in a cave. He had recently had a showdown between himself and the prophets of Baal. As you may recall, he won hands down. Jezebel, however, the wife of King Ahas and worshiper of Baal, threatened his life. Elijah had fled to Mount Horeb to escape:

At Horeb, the mount of God, Elijah came to a cave, and spent the night there. Then the word of the Lord came to him, saying, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He answered, “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”   (1 Kings 19:9-10)

It appears that Elijah had given up all hope. He responds to God’s question with an explanation of what is happening on the ground, so to speak, as if God’s needs his explanation to understand what is going on. What happened to Elijah? Perhaps he took some credit for the humiliation of the prophets of Baal. He was merely God’s messenger. God defeat these prophets.

God responds to Elijah’s concerns:

“Go out and stand on the mountain before the Lord, for the Lord is about to pass by.” Now there was a great wind, so strong that it was splitting mountains and breaking rocks in pieces before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind; and after the wind an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake; and after the earthquake a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire; and after the fire a sound of sheer silence. When Elijah heard it, he wrapped his face in his mantle and went out and stood at the entrance of the cave. Then there came a voice to him that said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He answered, “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”    (1 Kings 19:11-14)

God speaks to Elijah in a still small voice to remind him of how close he is to Elijah and how close he has been always been. Elijah was never alone. God’s word was with him all along. The Apostle Paul echoes this closeness by quoting Moses from the Old Testament:

Moses writes concerning the righteousness that comes from the law, that “the person who does these things will live by them.” But the righteousness that comes from faith says, “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will ascend into heaven?’” (that is, to bring Christ down) “or ‘Who will descend into the abyss?’” (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead). But what does it say?

“The word is near you,
on your lips and in your heart”

(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.   (Romans 10:5-10)

God is with us. He is there for us. We may put our trust in him. But when we rely on ourselves or give ourselves credit for some great accomplishment, we ultimately find ourselves hiding from God, thinking that he is no longer with us. Fear of fighting our battles alone leads can lead us astray. If we are listening, God is calling us to return to him and put our whole faith and trust in him once more.

If we have never known his presence in our lives now is the time to confess him. If we believe that Jesus is Lord of all and that God the Father raised him from the dead, then let us confess: “Jesus is Lord!” If we do not believe then let us ask God to help us to believe. He is very near. We are now living because he is breathing his Spirit into us. He is residing in our hearts right now. All we have to do is call upon his name. Amen.

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