Tag Archives: Jesus

Tuesday in Easter Week

do-you-hold-the-right-hand-of-jesus

 He Calls Us Each by Name

Mary Magdalene had a remarkable relationship with Jesus. He chose her to be the first witness of his resurrection:

Mary Magdalene stood weeping outside the tomb. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had been lying, one at the head and the other at the feet. They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.” When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni!” (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, “Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, `I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.'” Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”; and she told them that he had said these things to her.  (John 20:11-18)

Mary Magdalene did not recognize Jesus at first. She knew Him as her friend and teacher. When others condemned her he forgave her and delivered her from her demons. He was there for her when she needed God. But this time she did not recognize Him. God has been there for each one of us many times in our lives. There have been times when God moved for us but we did not recognize Him. We were not fully aware what He was doing.

Then there is a time when God speaks to us directly. He calls us out by name. The risen Lord spoke her name and Mary Magdalene recognized Him. Out of His grace God calls us unto Himself. He calls each one of us. The call of God is all important, but how we respond to His call is just as important.

Mary wanted to hold on to Jesus as the friend that she knew and loved. Jesus prevented her because He had to ascend to God the Father. His mission must continue. We cannot and should not try hold Him back. He cannot be tied down to the friend that we knew yesterday. He is Lord of all. He must continue to carry out the will of the Father. He does so on our behalf. We may not understand all that He is doing, but we must put our whole trust in him. Jesus has entered into a new realm. He is now calling us up to a new level.

We may know Jesus as the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world. He surely is that, for without him we could never enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Jesus is planning and building a new world, the one in which he reigning on earth. We are destined to reign with him. Do we know him as the Lion of Judah who will soon return to for the Bride of Christ?

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Monday in Easter Week

phariseesFreedom from Fear

The Jewish leaders realized the danger of Christian belief to their power structure, and they took extraordinary steps to prevent this from happening. From the Gospel of Matthew:

Suddenly Jesus met Mary Magdalene and the other Mary and said, “Greetings!” And they came to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”

While they were going, some of the guard went into the city and told the chief priests everything that had happened. After the priests had assembled with the elders, they devised a plan to give a large sum of money to the soldiers, telling them, “You must say, `His disciples came by night and stole him away while we were asleep.’ If this comes to the governor’s ears, we will satisfy him and keep you out of trouble.” So they took the money and did as they were directed. And this story is still told among the Jews to this day.  (Matthew 28:9-15)

The tomb was empty. That was a fact. What was needed was a plausible explanation that the people might believe. Does this sound like today’s political games? Why must so much effort be made to obscure the truth? Because the truth is dangerous.

The authorities wanted to keep things under control. The Apostle Peter was not known for political correctness. On the Day of Pentecost, he boldly sp0ke of the resurrection:

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed the multitude, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. You that are Israelites, listen to what I have to say: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with deeds of power, wonders, and signs that God did through him among you, as you yourselves know– this man, handed over to you according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of those outside the law. But God raised him up, having freed him from death, because it was impossible for him to be held in its power.  (Acts 2:14,22-25)

Where is the bold leadership today that we need? As people of God let us be filled with the Spirit and be set free from the fear of worldly authorities. Let us proclaim the truth of the Gospel with boldness. Jesus is risen from the dead. Truth is on the side of Christians. Only God’s word is true. The falsehood of this world is quickly passing away. Propaganda may work for awhile, but truth eventually triumphs over propaganda. The power of our testimony is all important to the degree and the hour when people perceive the truth. The tomb is empty. The lies of the enemy are nothing but lies. We are free to worship God without fear, for the risen Lord is with us. Amen.

SaveSave

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Resurrection Sunday: Easter Evening Service

Word and Sacrament

Jesus resurrection appearance to those travelers on the road to Emmaus has great theological significance. They were met by Jesus, who listened to their discussion concerning the resurrection. The travelers had been unable to understand or even believe some of the things that they had heard. After patiently listening to them, Jesus said:

“Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures.   (Luke 24:25-27)

The travelers wanted to hear more from Jesus and they encouraged Him to continue talking to them:

As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.” So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together. They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.  (Luke 24:28-35)

It is clear that the travelers were seekers of the truth. That is an ingredient that only we can provide. God will do the rest, but He depends on us to seek after Him. Often we may be confused, yet such confusion should lead us to search out the truth. The Apostle Paul explains that we must be open to new revelations concerning Christ:

Clean out the old yeast so that you may be a new batch, as you really are unleavened. For our paschal lamb, Christ, has been sacrificed. Therefore, let us celebrate the festival, not with the old yeast, the yeast of malice and evil, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.   (1 Corinthians 5:7-8)

Jesus did not fully reveal who He was until the breaking of the bread. This was the first service of Holy Communion after Jesus was raised from the dead. When Jesus broke the bread, which symbolized the breaking of His body upon the cross, the eyes of the travelers to Emmaus were opened. That is when they could say: “The Lord has risen indeed.”

We cannot overstate the importance of Communion in our Christian lives. From what Jesus has said, Communion is not optional.

Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them. Just as the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me.   (John 6:53-57)

Word or Sacrament – which one is significant? The answer is both. The worship of the Church is about Word and Sacrament preaching and the Holy Communion. The travelers on the road to Emmaus were intrigued and inspired by the teaching of Jesus along the way. They gained a more complete understanding of who Jesus was and is through their participation in the service of Holy Communion.

Jesus is risen. He still speaks to us today through his word. He is also alive and his real presence is active within the bread and wine of Holy Communion. Let us embrace all of Jesus.

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

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Holy Saturday

8940635-largeO Grave Where Is Thy Victory?

Job was a good man, but he was aware of his sins. He realized that God had every reason to pass judgment on him:

“I wish you would hide me in a grave!
    I wish you would cover me up until your anger passes by!
I wish you would set the time for me to spend in the grave
    and then bring me back up!
If someone dies, will they live again?
    All the days of my hard work
    I will wait for the time when you give me new life.   (Job 14:13-14)

Jesus died and hid in a grave for us:

At the place where Jesus was crucified, there was a garden. A new tomb was there. No one had ever been put in it before. That day was the Jewish Preparation Day, and the tomb was nearby. So they placed Jesus there.   (John 19:41-42)

Jesus bore our shame. He suffered the consequences of our sins, even to the extent of descending into Hell. His ministry did not stop there. His mission remained the same: “To seek and to save those who are lost.” The Apostle Peter makes it clear that the Gospel was proclaimed even to the dead:

Since therefore Christ suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same intention (for whoever has suffered in the flesh has finished with sin), so as to live for the rest of your earthly life no longer by human desires but by the will of God. You have already spent enough time in doing what the Gentiles like to do, living in licentiousness, passions, drunkenness, revels, carousing, and lawless idolatry. They are surprised that you no longer join them in the same excesses of dissipation, and so they blaspheme. But they will have to give an accounting to him who stands ready to judge the living and the dead. For this is the reason the gospel was proclaimed even to the dead, so that, though they had been judged in the flesh as everyone is judged, they might live in the spirit as God does.  (1 Peter 4:1-6)

We must be judged in the flesh in order to live in the Spirit. The good news is that Jesus has been judged for us. Jesus does not leave us in our flesh, but lifts us high into the Kingdom of God. The Apostle Paul writes:

Therefore it says,

“WHEN HE ASCENDED ON HIGH,
HE LED CAPTIVE A HOST OF CAPTIVES,
AND HE GAVE GIFTS TO MEN.”

(Now this expression, “He ascended,” what does it mean except that He also had descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is Himself also He who ascended far above all the heavens, so that He might fill all things.)   (Ephesians 4:8-10)

Are we ready to come out of the grave? Are we ready to receive the gifts of the Holy Spirit? Are we ready to become citizens, no longer of this earth, but in heaven? If so, we must embrace him. Job said:

For I know that my Redeemer lives,
and that at the last he[c] will stand upon the earth;
and after my skin has been thus destroyed,
then in my flesh I shall see God,
whom I shall see on my side,
and my eyes shall behold, and not another.   (Job 19:25-27)

We look forward to the resurrection of the dead. Jesus’ resurrection has become our resurrection.

O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.   (1 Corinthians 15:55-57 KJV)

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