Tag Archives: Jerusalem

Fifth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 10C

Track 1: The Plumb Line

Amos 7:7-17
Psalm 82
Colossians 1:1-14
Luke 10:25-37

God gave a prophecy to Amos that the leadership did not want to hear.

This is what the Lord God showed me: the Lord was standing beside a wall built with a plumb line, with a plumb line in his hand. And the Lord said to me, “Amos, what do you see?” And I said, “A plumb line.” Then the Lord said,

“See, I am setting a plumb line in the midst of my people Israel; I will never again pass them by;

the high places of Isaac shall be made desolate,
and the sanctuaries of Israel shall be laid waste,
and I will rise against the house of Jeroboam with the sword.”   (Amos 7:7-9)

God has the right to judge his people. The King believed that Amos had no right to talk to him this way. He was, after all, the head of the state. He ruled over the chosen people of God. Who was Amos?

Amaziah said to Amos, “O seer, go, flee away to the land of Judah, earn your bread there, and prophesy there; but never again prophesy at Bethel, for it is the king’s sanctuary, and it is a temple of the kingdom.”   (Amos 7:12-13)

The danger for all of us is that we think that God is pleased with us. Why is God not correcting somebody else who is far worse than we are? The psalmist asked:

“How long will you judge unjustly,
and show favor to the wicked?   (Psalm 82:2)

Let us be careful what we ask for. God responds:

Now I say to you, ‘You are gods,
and all of you children of the Most High;

Nevertheless, you shall die like mortals,
and fall like any prince.'”

Arise, O God, and rule the earth,
for you shall take all nations for your own.   (Psalm 82:6-8)

God is in charge. Only he can judge justly. Our understanding is too limited. God has made us in his image and, in a way, we are like him. But he is also wholly other than we are. Only God can be the righteous judge.

But this is Old Testament. What about the New Testament? Reading from the Gospel of Luke:

Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”   (Luke 10:25-28)

Jesus tells the lawyer he has given the right answer to his question. But the clinker is that God expects us to do his commandments. He is testing us, not the other way around. He is holding up his plumb line. Do we actually keep his commandments?

The lawyer was very much aware that he did not measure up, so he was looking for a loophole in the law. Again from Luke:

But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”   (Luke 10:29)

Perhaps he thought that if he could narrow down the definition of who a neighbor might be he might get by, at least for the neighbor part. Jesus responds with his famous parable of the Good Samaritan.

Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, `Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”   (Luke 10:30-37)

Samaritans were considered outcasts by the Jews. They were no longer part of God’s chosen people, or so they believed. It must have pained the lawyer to say that a Samaritan could be his neighbor.

We cannot justify ourselves. If we are honest with ourselves we will see that we have not measured up to God’s standards and, thus, we have no right to judge whether or not someone else has measured up. Any contemporary Levites among us want to admit that we have passed by the needed on the other side? Well, we get busy.

The good news is that Jesus has measured up to God’s plumb line. Is our faith grounded in him? The Apostle Paul prayed for the Colossians:

We have not ceased praying for you and asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of God’s will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so that you may lead lives worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, as you bear fruit in every good work and as you grow in the knowledge of God. May you be made strong with all the strength that comes from his glorious power, and may you be prepared to endure everything with patience, while joyfully giving thanks to the Father, who has enabled you to share in the inheritance of the saints in the light.   (Colossians 1:9-12)

In the New Testament God expects us to bear fruit. God will enable us to do so, provided that we embrace the Lord Jesus Christ and his victory over the grave, hell, and death. Paul continues:

He has rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of his beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.   (Colossians 1::13-14).

Amen.

 

 

Track 2: The Good Samaritan

Deuteronomy 30:9-14
Psalm 25:1-9
Colossians 1:1-14
Luke 10:25-37

In today’s Gospel reading from a Luke, a lawyer asks Jesus: “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus asks him what does the law say. His answer: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” Jesus then tells him to do this and he will live. But doing is the hard part. The lawyer knows that he has fallen short.

No offense to lawyers, but they can sometimes find loopholes in the law. This lawyer was looking for one. Perhaps he thought that, if he could narrowly define who his neighbor is, he might pass muster, at least the neighbor part of the commandment:

So wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”   (Luke 10:29)

Jesus answered him with this well known parable:

“A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, `Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”   (Luke 10:30-37)

Samaritans were considered outcasts by the Jews. They were no longer part of God’s chosen people, or so they believed. It must have pained the lawyer to say that a Samaritan could be his neighbor.

The lawyer must felt that the commandment was too hard for him. But the law giver Moses speaks otherwise. From Deuteronomy we read:

“Surely, this commandment that I am commanding you today is not too hard for you, nor is it too far away. It is not in heaven, that you should say, ‘Who will go up to heaven for us, and get it for us so that we may hear it and observe it?’ Neither is it beyond the sea, that you should say, ‘Who will cross to the other side of the sea for us, and get it for us so that we may hear it and observe it?’ No, the word is very near to you; it is in your mouth and in your heart for you to observe.”   (Deuteronomy 30:11-14)

Moses was saying that, if we have the law of God written on our hearts, we should be able to keep it. The Apostle Paul paraphrased Moses in this way:

Moses writes concerning the righteousness that comes from the law, that “the person who does these things will live by them.” But the righteousness that comes from faith says, “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will ascend into heaven?’” (that is, to bring Christ down) “or ‘Who will descend into the abyss?’” (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead). But what does it say?

“The word is near you,
    on your lips and in your heart”

(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.” For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. For, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.”   (Romans 10:5-13)

The promise for us is that, when we call on the name of the Lord, we shall be saved. I do not know about you, but, if I am going to keep the law the way Jesus said we should, I need to call upon him daily. He alone can do what I am not able to do. The Apostle Paul wrote to the Colossians:

In our prayers for you we always thank God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, for we have heard of your faith in Christ Jesus and of the love that you have for all the saints, because of the hope laid up for you in heaven. You have heard of this hope before in the word of the truth, the gospel that has come to you. Just as it is bearing fruit and growing in the whole world, so it has been bearing fruit among yourselves from the day you heard it and truly comprehended the grace of God.   (Colossians 1:3-8)

Jesus asks us to do good. We often get discouraged because we often fail. But let us not lose heart. We can do good with his help, if we hold on to the promise that God has made to us. If we hold on to the hope that is in the Gospel, then we will not lose hope. If we fully comprehend the grace which God has given us, how he has gone more than the extra mile for us, surely we can follow his example and give more of ourselves. He does not give up on us. We should not give up on him.

But what happens when we do fail? The Apostle John writes:

If we confess our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive us our sins and cleanse usfrom all unrighteousness.   (1 John 1:9)

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C

Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday

Remember Me When You Come into Your Kingdom

The Liturgy of the Palms

The Liturgy of the Word

It was the best of times. Jesus entered triumphantly into Jerusalem. From Luke’s Gospel we read:

As he rode along, people kept spreading their cloaks on the road. As he was now approaching the path down from the Mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to praise God joyfully with a loud voice for all the deeds of power that they had seen, saying,

“Blessed is the king
who comes in the name of the Lord!

Peace in heaven,
and glory in the highest heaven!”

Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, order your disciples to stop.” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the stones would shout out.”   (Luke 19:36-40)

It was the worst of times. How could the Jewish people, in less than a week, go from “Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!” to “Crucify Him?” Crucifixion was reserved for the worst criminals of the state. Jesus, the triumphant leader, became Jesus, the criminal whom they crucified. Do we ever leave the comfort of praising God in church and find ourselves later in the week taking the Lord’s name in vain?

How could the people change so quickly we ask. In defense of those who got caught up in the frenzy, we must remember that chief priests and religious leaders of the day had much to do with inciting the crowd. Truth is the first casualty with tyrannical leaders. We see that very clearly today.

Even Jesus’s most loyal disciples would leave him as Jesus had foretold. We read from Luke’s Gospel:

“Simon, Simon, listen! Satan has demanded[c] to sift all of you like wheat, but I have prayed for you that your own faith may not fail; and you, when once you have turned back, strengthen your brothers.” And he said to him, “Lord, I am ready to go with you to prison and to death!” Jesus said, “I tell you, Peter, the cock will not crow this day, until you have denied three times that you know me.”   (Luke 22:31-34)

Jesus understands our weaknesses. He has a plan for us to overcome them when we place our trust in him. It is never too late to repent. With his help we can change. For one criminal hanging on a cross beside Jesus time had run out. Perhaps it was too late for him:

One of the criminals who were hanged there kept deriding him and saying, “Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us!” But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed have been condemned justly, for we are getting what we deserve for our deeds, but this man has done nothing wrong.” Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” He replied, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”   (Luke 23:39-43)

This criminal found himself empty. Life had emptied him. He had nowhere to go. He was hanging on a cross. He had no one to turn to but Jesus. He was desperate. He had no time for religion. He was facing death and the consequences of his life choices. He could only say: “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” That was enough. Jesus made up the difference.

If we are still concerned about what others may say about us, then it is time for us to die to ourselves. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited,

but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
being born in human likeness.

And being found in human form,
he humbled himself
and became obedient to the point of death–
even death on a cross.   (Philippians 2:5-8)

Jesus had died to his own will. There was one more thing to do before he died physical:

It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon, while the sun’s light failed; and the curtain of the temple was torn in two. Then Jesus, crying with a loud voice, said, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” Having said this, he breathed his last. When the centurion saw what had taken place, he praised God and said, “Certainly this man was innocent.” And when all the crowds who had gathered there for this spectacle saw what had taken place, they returned home, beating their breasts. But all his acquaintances, including the women who had followed him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things.   (Luke 23:44-49)

Jesus commended his spirit to God the Father. By doing so he defeated sin, the grave and hell. He followed the Father’s plan. He died for the sins of the people. There was no more price to pay. He paid it all.

Where do we stand today? Do we desert Jesus in times of crisis as did Peter? We are living in a time of crisis where the Christian faith does not have a high approval rating. This may not new for most of the world, but it is for America. Are we willing to put our faith on the line?

At the time of the crucifixion many of Jesus followers deserted him. Others stood at a distance and watched. Maybe we are keeping our distance? Just to avoid any unpleasantries? This is no time for distance between us and Jesus. Distance leads to fear and weakness. It could ultimately our loss of faith.

Jesus won the victory. Again, he defeated sin, the grave and hell. How do we make his victory our victory? By putting our full trust in him. We are no different from the criminal on the cross. We have no other option. It may appear that we have some time left to think about it. But we do not. We have no guarantees for tomorrow. Now is the time of salvation.

Jesus had to restore and strengthen all his disciples. They became the great apostles of the New Testament. What he did for them he will do for us today. Are we willing to die to ourselves? Are we willing to take up our own cross daily and follow him? As we contemplate the Passion of Christ we see the great love that he has for us poured out on a cruel cross. What will be our love gift to him in return?

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, Lent, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Palm Sunday, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, The Passion, Year C

Second Sunday in Lent, Year C

Enemies of the Cross

The Apostle Paul wrote to the Church in Philippi about certain people who were the enemies of the cross of Christ:

Brothers and sisters, join in imitating me, and observe those who live according to the example you have in us. For many live as enemies of the cross of Christ; I have often told you of them, and now I tell you even with tears. Their end is destruction; their god is the belly; and their glory is in their shame; their minds are set on earthly things. But our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.    (Philippians 3:17-20)

Who were these enemies of the cross? Do they still exist today? To answer this question we must understand what the cross means. It means we have failed as human beings.

But now, apart from law, the righteousness of God has been disclosed, and is attested by the law and the prophets, the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction, since all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God; they are now justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a sacrifice of atonement[ by his blood, effective through faith.   (Romans 3:21-25)

Because we have sinned does not make us enemies of the cross. The real enemies of the cross are those who think they are righteous without the cross. The Pharisees believed that they were righteous because they kept the law of God. They were pious. They were religious. And they were judgmental of others. Their type still lives today, even in our churches.

As Jesus approached the city of Jerusalem one last time he wept over the city:

Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! See, your house is left to you. And I tell you, you will not see me until the time comes when you say, ‘Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord.'”   (Luke 13:34-35)

Jesus was facing death in Jerusalem. The Jewish leadership had rejected him. They had not just rejected him, they rejected his ministry. They believed that they did not need anything from Jesus because they had all that they wanted from their understanding of Judaism.

The Pharisees had a cursory understanding of the Law. But, as Jesus accused them, they neglected the weighty matters. From the Gospel of Matthew we read:

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint, dill, and cummin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faith. It is these you ought to have practiced without neglecting the others.   (Matthew 23:23)

The Pharisees failed to understand that God required righteousness. This could be imparted into them by God alone. It took the atoning act of Jesus on the cross, and it required their acceptance, appreciation, adoration, and praise. They would have none of it.

God was looking for Abrahams. From today’s Old Testament reading:

The word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision, “Do not be afraid, Abram, I am your shield; your reward shall be very great.” But Abram said, “O Lord God, what will you give me, for I continue childless, and the heir of my house is Eliezer of Damascus?” And Abram said, “You have given me no offspring, and so a slave born in my house is to be my heir.” But the word of the Lord came to him, “This man shall not be your heir; no one but your very own issue shall be your heir.” He brought him outside and said, “Look toward heaven and count the stars, if you are able to count them.” Then he said to him, “So shall your descendants be.” And he believed the Lord; and the Lord reckoned it to him as righteousness.    (Genesis 15:1-6)

God made of covenant with Abraham. All Abraham had to do was to believe it and receive it. Abraham had some doubts, at first, because it seemed as if he would have no offspring through whom the promise of God could be brought forth. God makes us promises, but we must believe him. The greatest promise he makes to us is forgiveness, salvation, and life eternal with him. We must believe him and we must trust him to bring this about.

Are we enemies of the cross today? That depends. Are we smug in our faith? Do we focus on the faults of others and overlook at own faults? If any of this is true about us, then we have misunderstood the cross altogether. Jesus said:

“If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me.   (Luke 9:23)

If we do not wish to follow Jesus in this way, then we are enemies of the cross. The cross demands that we deny ourselves. We do not have all the answers. We cannot make ourselves righteous by our good works. God demands more than we will ever be able to do on our own. He requires our faith and trust that he alone can make us righteous. We must believe in Jesus, but we must also follow him. Abraham believed and followed God. God reckoned it to him as righteousness.

During this Season of Lent, it is traditional for many to give up something they enjoy as an act of penance or spiritual discipline. If successful, the temptation might be that they become prideful about it. What about denying ourselves instead? What about giving up our right to be right? What about placing ourselves entirely in the hands of God? That frees him to fashion in the likeness of his Son, as only he can do.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, Lent, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C