Tag Archives: humility

Seventh Sunday of Easter, Year B

The Testimony of God

The great basketball coach John Wooden was well-known, not only for winning 10 NCAA championships, but also for his sayings on life. This was one of them:

“Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”

There is much wisdom in what he is saying. Reputations are based on the perception of others. Often their perceptions are not very accurate. Jesus warned:

“Woe to you when all speak well of you, for that is what their ancestors did to the false prophets.”   (Luke 6:26)

In his First Epistle, John writes that we have a greater testimony than human testimony:

If we receive human testimony, the testimony of God is greater; for this is the testimony of God that he has testified to his Son. Those who believe in the Son of God have the testimony in their hearts. Those who do not believe in God have made him a liar by not believing in the testimony that God has given concerning his Son. And this is the testimony: God gave us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. Whoever has the Son has life; whoever does not have the Son of God does not have life.   (1 John 5:9-12)

Are we more interested in the praise of men that the praise of God? The praise of men is fleeting at best. The public is fickle, and as we have noted, often wrong. People look at surface values and do not see the heart of a person as God does. God sees our heart and draws us to himself. He is no respecter of persons. He is not influenced about what others might think or say. What could be more comforting than the testimony of God dwelling in our heart that we are his, that he cherishes us, and that we have eternal life in him through the blood sacrifice of his Son?

Not only is human praise fleeting, but this world is passing away. In his high priestly prayer, Jesus declares that his disciples are no longer of this world, just as he is not of this world. He asks the Father that he would protect his disciples from the evil one of this world, Satan.

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one. While I was with them, I protected them in your name that you have given me. I guarded them, and not one of them was lost except the one destined to be lost, so that the scripture might be fulfilled. But now I am coming to you, and I speak these things in the world so that they may have my joy made complete in themselves. I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but I ask you to protect them from the evil one. They do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world.

If we are true Christians the world will hate us. This is becoming increasingly more obvious each day. This hate, however, cannot separate us from the love of God, nor can it take away the peace we have in our hearts. God is preparing us for a better world. In the meantime, Jesus wants his joy to be made complete in us, praying that we are one in him with the Father.

Each day, let us pause and listen to the inner testimony of God in our hearts. It is stronger than any human testimony. And it is truthful and lasting. All other testimonies are empty words from empty people. Let us remember to pray to God that they, too, might be filled with the knowledge of the love of God in Christ Jesus.

Leave a comment

Filed under Easter, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B

Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year B

The Good Shepherd

In this world we are either hired hands or true shepherds. Jesus said:

“I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. The hired hand, who is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away—and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. The hired hand runs away because a hired hand does not care for the sheep.”   (John 10:11-13)

Fortunately, for us, Jesus was not a hired hand. He went the distance for us, even to dying on a cruel cross. He is our example. The Apostle John tells us that we are to emulate Jesus:

We know love by this, that he laid down his life for us — and we ought to lay down our lives for one another. How does God’s love abide in anyone who has the world’s goods and sees a brother or sister in need and yet refuses help?   (1 John 3:16-17)

What keeps us from doing this? The answer may be that we do not know Jesus as our shepherd. In this challenging world we face many dangers and upsetting circumstances. It is easy to become so much concerned for ourselves that we have little time and energy for others. King David wrote a psalm that reminds us who our caretaker is:

The Lord is my shepherd;
I shall not be in want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures
and leads me beside still waters.

He revives my soul
and guides me along right pathways for his Name’s sake.

Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I shall fear no evil;
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

You spread a table before me in the presence of those who trouble me;
you have anointed my head with oil,
and my cup is running over.

Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.   (Psalm 23)

In today’s first reading, the chief priests tried to get Peter and John to abandon their faith in Christ Jesus. That wa

If we this day are judged for a good deed done to a helpless man, by what means he has been made well, let it be known to you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead, by Him this man stands here before you whole. This is the ‘stone which was rejected by you builders, which has become the chief cornerstone.’ Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.”   (Acts 4:9-12)

Abandoning Jesus was not an option for Peter and John, regardless of the circumstances in which they found themselves. Is Jesus our cornerstone? Is he the author and finisher of our faith? Are we willing to abandoned all our personal cares and trust Jesus as our good shepherd. The Apostle Peter wrote:

Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, so that he may exalt you in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him, because he cares for you.   (1 Peter 5{6-7)

The Apostle Paul echos Peter:

Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 4:5-7)

Jesus is our peace and freedom from anxiety. Without him we can do nothing. We cannot love others without first loving our Lord. When we bathe in his love, mercy, and forgiveness, his love flows out from us to others. His love never fails. He is the good shepherd who will never leave his sheep.

Paul wrote:

For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.   (Romans 8:38-39)

Apart from Jesus we are just hired hands at best. When the going gets tough we may abandon our Lord. But we are not hired hands. We are the under-shepherds of Christ. Let us go out and love others into the kingdom of God.

Leave a comment

Filed under Easter, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B

Second Sunday of Easter, Year B

Attitude of Disbelief or Fellowship of the Spirit

Thomas had an attitude. The other disciples of Jesus had seen their risen Lord, but Thomas was not with them at the time. He was skeptical, saying:

“Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”   (John 20:25)

What was Thomas’s problem? Unbelief was one. Perhaps Thomas thought he was right and everyone else was wrong. He had not been on  the scene when Jesus first appeared to his disciples. Yet he must have believed that he knew more than those who saw Jesus alive. Do we see anyone in our churches like that today? They just know more than the rest of us.

Maybe we are being unfair to Thomas, He had been faithfully following Jesus. The whole experience of the cross, perhaps, was just too much for him to take in. He must have questiioned: Why did the Messiah have to go through that?

Our human understanding has limitations – grave limitations! People who are caught up in this world fai to understand that they are living in spiritual blindness. Without the light of Christ we cannot see. In his first letter the Apostle John wrote:

This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that God is light and in him there is no darkness at all. If we say that we have fellowship with him while we are walking in darkness, we lie and do not do what is true; but if we walk in the light as he himself is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin. If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.   (1 John 1:1-2:2)

If we are to fully participate in the fellowship of the Holy Spirit and the body of Christ, which is the Church, we must be willing to be exposed by the light of Christ. Only if we walk in the light, John says, do we have fellowship with one another. We are all sinners. No one is more important than another. We have not arrived. We must be willing to confess our sins. Only then can God forgive us and cleanse us.

There is no unity when we are score keepers of others. There is no unity when we think we are better than others or know more than them. If we are transparent, if we are humble, if we are lovers of God and lovers of our neighbors, then and only then is true fellowship possible.

Here is Luke’s description of the Early Church:

Now the whole group of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one claimed private ownership of any possessions, but everything they owned was held in common. With great power the apostles gave their testimony to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great grace was upon them all.   (Acts 4:32-33)

Are we willing to be of one heart and soul? This cannot be legislated by any government. True sharing and mutual affection is from the heart – the heart of God. Thomas was outside the group, not just in a different location. He was outside of fellowship of his fellow believers because he could not accept their testimony.

Jesus forgave him. He forgives us all. But we must be transparent. We must be willing to confess our sins. It is time to check our attitudes. It is time to take off our masks. We are not better than any other believer, nor or we worse. In the Book of James we read:

Therefore confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another, so that you may be healed. The prayer of the righteous is powerful and effective.   (James 5:16)

A healthy community of believers is made up of grateful, humble people who believe in the gifts and grace of God. They are too excited about telling the good news of Christ’s love to others than to allow the circumstances of this life and the attitudes of the flesh to get in the way.

The psalmist wrote:

Oh, how good and pleasant it is,
when brethren live together in unity!   (Psalm 133:1)

Our churches must be a place of refuse, a place of acceptance, a place where we find forgiveness and the mercy of God. Are we going to stand in the way of that just because we have the Thomas attitude? That attitude is more than must doubt. It is one of a false sense of superiority and a blindness to one’s own faults.

The Apostle Paul wrote to his young protégé Timothy:

If then there is any encouragement in Christ, any consolation from love, any sharing in the Spirit, any compassion and sympathy, make my joy complete: be of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility regard others as better than yourselves. Let each of you look not to your own interests, but to the interests of others. Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

 

who, though he was in the form of God,
    did not regard equality with God
    as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
    taking the form of a slave,
    being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
    he humbled himself
    and became obedient to the point of death —
    even death on a cross.   (Philippians 2:1-8)

Leave a comment

Filed under Easter, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B