Tag Archives: human testimony

Seventh Sunday of Easter, Year B

The Testimony of God

The great basketball coach John Wooden was well-known, not only for winning 10 NCAA championships, but also for his sayings on life. This was one of them:

“Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”

There is much wisdom in what he is saying. Reputations are based on the perception of others. Often their perceptions are not very accurate. Jesus warned:

“Woe to you when all speak well of you, for that is what their ancestors did to the false prophets.”   (Luke 6:26)

In his First Epistle, John writes that we have a greater testimony than human testimony:

If we receive human testimony, the testimony of God is greater; for this is the testimony of God that he has testified to his Son. Those who believe in the Son of God have the testimony in their hearts. Those who do not believe in God have made him a liar by not believing in the testimony that God has given concerning his Son. And this is the testimony: God gave us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. Whoever has the Son has life; whoever does not have the Son of God does not have life.   (1 John 5:9-12)

Are we more interested in the praise of men that the praise of God? The praise of men is fleeting at best. The public is fickle, and as we have noted, often wrong. People look at surface values and do not see the heart of a person as God does. God sees our heart and draws us to himself. He is no respecter of persons. He is not influenced about what others might think or say. What could be more comforting than the testimony of God dwelling in our heart that we are his, that he cherishes us, and that we have eternal life in him through the blood sacrifice of his Son?

Not only is human praise fleeting, but this world is passing away. In his high priestly prayer, Jesus declares that his disciples are no longer of this world, just as he is not of this world. He asks the Father that he would protect his disciples from the evil one of this world, Satan.

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one. While I was with them, I protected them in your name that you have given me. I guarded them, and not one of them was lost except the one destined to be lost, so that the scripture might be fulfilled. But now I am coming to you, and I speak these things in the world so that they may have my joy made complete in themselves. I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but I ask you to protect them from the evil one. They do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world.

If we are true Christians the world will hate us. This is becoming increasingly more obvious each day. This hate, however, cannot separate us from the love of God, nor can it take away the peace we have in our hearts. God is preparing us for a better world. In the meantime, Jesus wants his joy to be made complete in us, praying that we are one in him with the Father.

Each day, let us pause and listen to the inner testimony of God in our hearts. It is stronger than any human testimony. And it is truthful and lasting. All other testimonies are empty words from empty people. Let us remember to pray to God that they, too, might be filled with the knowledge of the love of God in Christ Jesus.

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Filed under Easter, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B

Confession of Saint Peter

jesus-peter1Who Do You Say That I Am?

In today’s readings we examine the most important question in all the world. From the Gospel of Matthew:

When Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”   (Matthew 16:13-16)

How fitting it is to have the Confession of Peter observed within the Season of the Epiphany. Peter was first among the apostles to confess that Jesus is the Messiah. The Apostle Peter’s earthly testimony compliments the heavenly one. At the baptism of Jesus God the Father spoke from heaven, testifying that Jesus is His beloved Son.

Peter’s testimony was quite remarkable. At a time when there was much confusion and speculation about who Jesus was, Peter had come to a clear and concise conclusion about Jesus’ identity. He did not do so by his own reasoning alone, however:

And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven.  (Matthew 16:17)

We remember that Peter not only confessed Jesus as the Messiah, but later he also denied Jesus. Just before the crucifixion Peter proclaimed that he would never leave or forsake Jesus. But Jesus knew better. He understands the frailties of human beings:

Jesus answered, “I tell you, Peter, before the rooster crows today, you will deny three times that you know me.”  (Luke 22:34)

Jesus gives us this warning concerning our confession:

Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven.  (Matthew 10:32-33)

Peter discovered that he could not continue in the Faith on his own strength. He needed the strength that only God could provide. We remember that Jesus forgave Peter and restored him after the resurrection. Our confession is important. Our continual confession is all important.

In Peter’s own words:

“There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among mortals by which we must be saved.”  (Acts 4:12)

Today many people are confused about who Jesus is and what may be His place in history. Many biblical “scholars” have disputed the person and ministry of Jesus. Yet, we have God’s testimony and Peter’s testimony recorded in Holy Scripture. What will be our recorded testimony? How will we confess Jesus before men? At a time when Christians are being persecuted we will need God’s help to build and strengthen our faith as He did Peter. This will be all the more true for the troubling days ahead.

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Filed under Confesson of St. Peter, Epiphany, Feast Day, Holy Day, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, Saint Peter, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B