Tag Archives: holiness

Twenty First Sunday after Pentecost Proper 25A

Track 1: Disobedience and Obedience

Deuteronomy 34:1-12
Psalm 90:1-6, 13-17
1 Thessalonians 2:1-8
Matthew 22:34-46

It must have been a sad day for Moses:

Moses went up from the plains of Moab to Mount Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, which is opposite Jericho, and the Lord showed him the whole land: Gilead as far as Dan, all Naphtali, the land of Ephraim and Manasseh, all the land of Judah as far as the Western Sea, the Negeb, and the Plain—that is, the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees—as far as Zoar. The Lord said to him, “This is the land of which I swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, saying, ‘I will give it to your descendants’; I have let you see it with your eyes, but you shall not cross over there.”   (Deuteronomy 34:1-4)

An act of disobedience kept Moses from entering of the promise land. Yet he also had reason to rejoice. By his leadership the children of Israel were led out of Egypt. With his help they survived in the wilderness. Before we become to hard on Moses let us be reminded of what Moses accomplished with God’s help:

Never since has there arisen a prophet in Israel like Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face. He was unequaled for all the signs and wonders that the Lord sent him to perform in the land of Egypt, against Pharaoh and all his servants and his entire land, and for all the mighty deeds and all the terrifying displays of power that Moses performed in the sight of all Israel.   (Deuteronomy 34:10-12)

Moses, along with Elijah, was on the Mount of Transfiguration with Jesus. As important as he is, he cannot compare to the Messiah. In Hebrews we read:

Therefore, brothers and sisters, holy partners in a heavenly calling, consider that Jesus, the apostle and high priest of our confession, was faithful to the one who appointed him, just as Moses also “was faithful in all God’s house.” Yet Jesus is worthy of more glory than Moses, just as the builder of a house has more honor than the house itself. (For every house is built by someone, but the builder of all things is God.) Now Moses was faithful in all God’s house as a servant, to testify to the things that would be spoken later. Christ, however, was faithful over God’s house as a son, and we are his house if we hold firm the confidence and the pride that belong to hope.   (Hebrews 3:1-5)

Moses helped pave the way for the Messiah. As important as the Law of Moses is it is Jesus Christ who fulfills the Law. That is something the Pharisees did understand not did they want to understand. Jesus knew their hearts. When he raised a very significant question concerning Judaism, they were unwilling to explore the matter of the Messiah with him:

Now while the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them this question: “What do you think of the Messiah? Whose son is he?” They said to him, “The son of David.” He said to them, “How is it then that David by the Spirit calls him Lord, saying,

‘The Lord said to my Lord,
“Sit at my right hand,
until I put your enemies under your feet”’?

If David thus calls him Lord, how can he be his son?” No one was able to give him an answer, nor from that day did anyone dare to ask him any more questions.   (Matthew 22:41-46)

The Pharisees of Jesus’ day were a proud group. They wanted to define Judaism on their own terms. How many of us want to do the same today? We are about ready to enter a promised land that will last for eternity. There is no entrance into this land without the Messiah leading us. He is our Moses. Are we willing to follow him in all circumstances?

The Apostle Peter:

There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among mortals by which we must be saved.”   (Acts 4:12)

Moses did not enter the promised land, but he made a way for the children of Israel to do so who were willing to follow him. For the kingdom of heaven, Jesus has proven himself to be the way. He has gone before us. He has risen from the dead so that we, too, may be raised up to newness of life in him.

 

 

 

Track 2: Son of Man and Son of God

Leviticus 19:1-2,15-18
Psalm 1
1 Thessalonians 2:1-8
Matthew 22:34-46

In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus asks a theological question that resonates down to this day. It was so deep and so revealing that the Pharisees refused to answer it:

Now while the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them this question: “What do you think of the Messiah? Whose son is he?” They said to him, “The son of David.” He said to them, “How is it then that David by the Spirit calls him Lord, saying,

‘The Lord said to my Lord,
“Sit at my right hand,
until I put your enemies under your feet”’?

If David thus calls him Lord, how can he be his son?” No one was able to give him an answer, nor from that day did anyone dare to ask him any more questions.   (Matthew 22:41-46)

What is at steak here? The Messiahship, the Holy Trinity, the authority of Christ, the identity of Christ, the purpose of Christ, or all of the above. God had a made a promise to King David that one of his descendants would have an eternal throne. David’s kingdom would never cease. How was this to take place?

On the Day of Pentecost, the Apostle Peter’s sermon shed great light on the subject of Messiah. Peter explained that King David, because he was a prophet, spoke of the resurrection of one of his descendants:

“Fellow Israelites, I may say to you confidently of our ancestor David that he both died and was buried, and his tomb is with us to this day. Since he was a prophet, he knew that God had sworn with an oath to him that he would put one of his descendants on his throne. Foreseeing this, David spoke of the resurrection of the Messiah, saying,

‘He was not abandoned to Hades,
    nor did his flesh experience corruption.’

This Jesus God raised up, and of that all of us are witnesses. Being therefore exalted at the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, he has poured out this that you both see and hear. For David did not ascend into the heavens, but he himself says,

‘The Lord said to my Lord,
“Sit at my right hand,
     until I make your enemies your footstool.”’

Therefore let the entire house of Israel know with certainty that God has made him both Lord and Messiah this Jesus whom you crucified.”   (Acts 2:32-36)

By the resurrection, God the Father made Jesus, the descendant of David, both Lord and Messiah. Jesus became Lord. Some scholars have argues that this statement goes against the Holy Trinity in that Jesus was not always Lord. How could someone who descended from David be Lord of David when he had not yet been resurrected from the dear?

The statement: ‘The Lord said to my Lord, “Sit at my right hand, until I make your enemies your footstool”’ plays a key role. Translating from the Hebrew, the first Lord in the statement is Yahweh, God the Father. God the Father spoke to someone who was already Lord of King David.

To understand the role of the Messiah, we need to understand his dual nature. The Apostle Paul explains this very well in the first chapter of Romans:

Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy scriptures, the gospel concerning his Son, who was descended from David according to the flesh and was declared to be Son of God with power according to the spirit of holiness by resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord, through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles for the sake of his name, including yourselves who are called to belong to Jesus Christ,   (Romans 1:1-6)

Although Jesus was descended from David by the flesh, another element was also involved. Jesus was born of a virgin by the power of the Holy Spirit. Before his birth on earth he was the Son of God. John’s Gospel makes this very clear:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

If Jesus was Lord in heaven, why did he have to become Lord again by the resurrection? Because when he came to earth he emptied himself of his divinity. The Apostle Paul writes:

Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
    did not regard equality with God
    as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
    taking the form of a slave,
    being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
    he humbled himself
    and became obedient to the point of death—
    even death on a cross.

Therefore God also highly exalted him
    and gave him the name
    that is above every name,
so that at the name of Jesus
    every knee should bend,
    in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue should confess
    that Jesus Christ is Lord,
    to the glory of God the Father.   (Philippians 2:5-11)

Jesus is both Son of God and Son of Man. Jesus question to the Pharisees was more than a Christological exercise. It has everything to do with our understanding of the Messiah. Jesus lived and died as one of us. He understands us and intercedes for us before the Father.

It was fitting that God, for whom and through whom all things exist, in bringing many children to glory, should make the pioneer of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For the one who sanctifies and those who are sanctified all have one Father. For this reason Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers and sisters, saying,

“I will proclaim your name to my brothers and sisters,
    in the midst of the congregation I will praise you.”   (Hebrews 2:10-12)

David’s Lord is our Lord. Are we ready to put our full trust in him? He has proven himself to both God and man. He is waiting to prove that we are his brothers and sisters before the Father in heaven, but we must follow him. He has gone before us to pave the way and show us that he is the way. Amen.

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Feast of Trumpets

The Trumpet Shall Sound

Blow the trumpet in Zion;
    sound the alarm on my holy mountain!
Let all the inhabitants of the land tremble,
    for the day of the Lord is coming, it is near—
a day of darkness and gloom,
    a day of clouds and thick darkness!
Like blackness spread upon the mountains
    a great and powerful army comes;
their like has never been from of old,
    nor will be again after them
    in ages to come.   (Joel 2:1-2)

I have been called to sound an alarm.

“Cry aloud, spare not; lift up your voice like a trumpet; tell My people their transgression, and the house of Jacob their sins.”   (Isaiah 58:1)

The Prophet Isaiah speaks about the human voice being a trumpet. God requires his watchmen to speak a warning. The Prophet Ezekiel was given a similar charge:

The word of the Lord came to me: “Son of man, speak to your people and say to them, If I bring the sword upon a land, and the people of the land take a man from among them, and make him their watchman, and if he sees the sword coming upon the land and blows the trumpet and warns the people, then if anyone who hears the sound of the trumpet does not take warning, and the sword comes and takes him away, his blood shall be upon his own head. He heard the sound of the trumpet and did not take warning; his blood shall be upon himself. But if he had taken warning, he would have saved his life. But if the watchman sees the sword coming and does not blow the trumpet, so that the people are not warned, and the sword comes and takes any one of them, that person is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood I will require at the watchman’s hand.

“So you, tson of man, I have made a watchman for the house of Israel. Whenever you hear a word from my mouth, you shall give them warning from me. If I say to the wicked, O wicked one, you shall surely die, cand you do not speak to warn the wicked to turn from his way, cthat wicked person shall die in his iniquity, but his blood I will require at your hand. But if you warn the wicked to turn from his way, and he does not turn from his way, dthat person shall die in his iniquity, ebut you will have delivered your soul.   (Ezekiel 33:1–9)

Watchmen must blow the trumpet. He or she has no option, otherwise their soul would be accountable before God.

Likewise the Prophet Joel echoes a warning, a warning that reverberates down through the ages:

“Blow the trumpet in Zion;
    sanctify a fast;
call a solemn assembly;
    gather the people.
Sanctify the congregation;
    assemble the aged;
gather the children,
    even infants at the breast.
Let the bridegroom leave his room,
    and the bride her canopy.

Between the vestibule and the altar
    let the priests, the ministers of the Lord, weep.
Let them say, “Spare your people, O Lord,
    and do not make your heritage a mockery,
    a byword among the nations.
Why should it be said among the peoples,
    ‘Where is their God?’”   (Joel 2:15-17)

What is the warning that God is giving us. We must repent. Even the church leadership must repent. The judgment of God starts with the church. The Apostle Peter writes:

For the time has come for judgment to begin with the household of God; if it begins with us, what will be the end for those who do not obey the gospel of God?   (1 Peter 4:17)

Church, we have failed to preach the Gospel faithfully. We have failed to preach holy living. What have we been preaching? Self-help sermons? Prosperity? The Early Church members sold their property to give to the poor.

Have we forgotten that the church was built on the blood of martyrs? These people were only rich in the Spirit. Stephen was stoned for his holiness. Today we say people are poor because they have no faith. But Jesus said: “Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (Matthew 5:3)

God is calling ministers to prepare his people. Many Christians are not prepared. Not all Christians will be ready when the Lord returns for his bride. We remember the Parable of the Ten Bridesmaids:

“Then the kingdom of heaven will be like this. Ten bridesmaids[a] took their lamps and went to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. When the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them; but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps. As the bridegroom was delayed, all of them became drowsy and slept. But at midnight there was a shout, ‘Look! Here is the bridegroom! Come out to meet him.’ Then all those bridesmaids got up and trimmed their lamps. The foolish said to the wise, ‘Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out.’ But the wise replied, ‘No! there will not be enough for you and for us; you had better go to the dealers and buy some for yourselves.’ And while they went to buy it, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went with him into the wedding banquet; and the door was shut. Later the other bridesmaids[d] came also, saying, ‘Lord, lord, open to us.’ But he replied, ‘Truly I tell you, I do not know you.’ Keep awake therefore, for you know neither the day nor the hour.   (Matthew 25:1-13)

Half of the bridesmaids did not have oil in their lamps, representing the Holy Spirit. If we are distracted by the things of this world, if we are not focused on the soon return of the Lord, we are in danger. This is not the time to be living as a nominal or casual Christian. 

We are living in urgent times. Can we not read the signs? Once again we read from Joel:

I will show portents in the heavens and on the earth, blood and fire and columns of smoke. The sun shall be turned to darkness, and the moon to blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord comes. Then everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.   (Joel 2:30-32)

Does this ring a bell? The four blood moons? The total eclipse across America?

But concerning the times and the seasons, brethren, you have no need that I should write to you. For you yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so comes as a thief in the night. For when they say, “Peace and safety!” then sudden destruction comes upon them, as labor pains upon a pregnant woman. And they shall not escape. But you, brethren, are not in darkness, so that this Day should overtake you as a thief. You are all sons of light and sons of the day. We are not of the night nor of darkness.   (1 Thessalonians 5;1-5)

Peace and safety is the theme of this year’s UN Day of Peace. Those who do not see the signs of the time do not want to see them.

The Epistles of Peter are short and compact, but they speak just as loudly to us today as they did to the Early Church:

The end of all things is near; therefore be serious and discipline yourselves for the sake of your prayers. Above all, maintain constant love for one another, for love covers a multitude of sins. Be hospitable to one another without complaining. Like good stewards of the manifold grace of God, serve one another with whatever gift each of you has received. Whoever speaks must do so as one speaking the very words of God; whoever serves must do so with the strength that God supplies, so that God may be glorified in all things through Jesus Christ. To him belong the glory and the power forever and ever. Amen.   (1 Peter 4:7-11)

Since all these things are to be dissolved in this way, what sort of persons ought you to be in leading lives of holiness and godliness, waiting for and hastening the coming of the day of God, because of which the heavens will be set ablaze and dissolved, and the elements will melt with fire? But, in accordance with his promise, we wait for new heavens and a new earth, where righteousness is at home.   (2 Peter 3:9-13)

The messages of many churches in America has been about the cares of this life. This life is passing away very quickly. From the Gospel of Luke let us heed the warning of our Lord Jesus Christ:

“But take heed to yourselves, lest your hearts be weighed down with carousing, drunkenness, and cares of this life, and that Day come on you unexpectedly. For it will come as a snare on all those who dwell on the face of the whole earth. Watch therefore, and pray always that you may be counted worthy to escape all these things that will come to pass, and to stand before the Son of Man.”   (Luke 21:34-36)

Now is the time to escape this world, not embrace it:

So if you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth, for you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is your[a] life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory.

Put to death, therefore, whatever in you is earthly: fornication, impurity, passion, evil desire, and greed (which is idolatry). On account of these the wrath of God is coming on those who are disobedient. These are the ways you also once followed, when you were living that life. But now you must get rid of all such things—anger, wrath, malice, slander, and abusive[d] language from your mouth. Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have stripped off the old self with its practices and have clothed yourselves with the new self, which is being renewed in knowledge according to the image of its creator.   (Colossians 3:1-10)

This is not a time to despair over the things of this earth, but a time to rejoice in the fellowship of saints:

Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,

In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.

For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality.   (1 Corinthians 15:51-53)

Amen!

 

The Jewish Feast Days were given to Moses on Mount Sinai. They are days appointed by God for the Jewish people, but they have a great deal to do with the Christian Church and the whole world.

The Feast Days may be divided into three Spring and three Fall Feast Days. Beginning with the Spring ones: The Jewish Passover, which celebrated the death angle passing over the children of Israel in Egypt, was prophetically filled on Good Friday where the blood of  Jesus shed on the cross caused God’s judgment to passover us. The Feast of Unleavened Bread represents Jesus’ burial and the Feast of First Fruits has to do with His resurrection. Jesus is the first fruit of the resurrection. Those who believe in Him will follow. Pentecost celebrated the giving of the Law of Moses. It is also the prophetic fulfillment of the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, when God would write His law on our hearts. This date also marks the beginning of the Christian Church.

The Fall Feasts of Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles have not yet been fulfilled prophetically,. In reverse order: Tabernacles signified God’s dwelling with His people in the wilderness. It will not be prophetically fulfilled  until the Second Coming and the Millennial Reign of Jesus Christ. The Day of Atonement which celebrated Israel’s separation from sin could very well picture the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, when we are received as his bride without spot or w wrinkle. The Feast of Trumpets which represented new beginnings for the Jewish people may very well represent the rapture of the bride of Christ.

Unlike the Spring Feasts, where prophetic events actually occurred on their dates, the Fall Feast dates may not necessarily telegraph the actual dates of their prophetic fulfillment. They do, however, point to those events. The close of the Church age, the catching away of the bride, and beginning of the Great Tribulation are events that mere moments away compared to the length of the Church Age in which we live.

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Holy Cross Day

Day of Judgment

The Prophet Isaiah forecast a time when God would hold a court to judge humankind for sin. Isaiah was speaking to the nation of Israel, but Israel was a proxy for all the nations of the world.

Through Isaiah God made this declaration:

Declare and present your case;
let them take counsel together!

Who told this long ago?
Who declared it of old?

Was it not I, the Lord?
There is no other god besides me,

a righteous God and a Saviour;
there is no one besides me.   (Isaiah 45:21)

We are asked by God to present our case to him. God is also saying that he is qualified to judge our case because he is creator and has established all life. There is no other god besides him. Furthermore, his very nature and character qualifies him. He will be fair because he is not only a righteous God, but he is also our Savior.

A righteous God must be fair, but he must also be just. He must declare the injustice caused by sin. Sin cannot ignored or swept under the rug. “For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” according to Romans 6:23.

How is God able to accomplish a most difficult task, that of being both compassionate and just?

Before his verdict of guilty and penalty of death, God provided a path of escape. He did so through his Son Jesus Christ. The Apostle Paul reminds us of the cruel crucifixion of Jesus by his own choice and desire:

Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited,

but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
being born in human likeness.

And being found in human form,
he humbled himself
and became obedient to the point of death—
even death on a cross.

Therefore God also highly exalted him
and gave him the name
that is above every name,

so that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,

and every tongue should confess
that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.   (Philippians 2:5-11)

In today’s Gospel reading we see a link between the judgement of God and a route of escape:

Jesus said, “Now is the judgment of this world; now the ruler of this world will be driven out. And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” He said this to indicate the kind of death he was to die.   (John 12:31-33)

On the cross the sins of the whole world were judged. Jesus bore our sins for us while hanging from a cross and received the Father’s judgement.  That final of judgement of sin was once and for all, for all who believe. The Apostle Paul’s full quote from Romans is this:

“For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.”   (Romans 6:23)

Have we allow God to judge our sins through his Son Jesus? If so, we must acknowledge it. We must turn towards Jesus. One more God spoke through the Prophet Isaiah:

Turn to me and be saved,
all the ends of the earth!
For I am God, and there is no other.

By myself I have sworn,
from my mouth has gone forth in righteousness
a word that shall not return:

“To me every knee shall bow,
every tongue shall swear.”

Only in the Lord, it shall be said of me,
are righteousness and strength;

all who were incensed against him
shall come to him and be ashamed.

In the Lord all the offspring of Israel
shall triumph and glory.   (Isaiah 45:22-25)

Do we want triumph and glory? The only judgement of God that is left is the judgement of fallen angels. That judgement is not meant for us. Do we ignore such a great gift of salvation established on a Holy Cross? If Jesus humbled himself, why can we not humble ourselves? In Hebrews we read:

Therefore we must pay greater attention to what we have heard, so that we do not drift away from it. For if the message declared through angels was valid, and every transgression or disobedience received a just penalty, how can we escape if we neglect so great a salvation? It was declared at first through the Lord, and it was attested to us by those who heard him, while God added his testimony by signs and wonders and various miracles, and by gifts of the Holy Spirit, distributed according to his will..   (Hebrews 2:1-4)

It is the cross that makes us holy. We have been washed in the blood of Jesus.  God’s judgment day was on the day Jesus died on that cross. If we refuse what Christ has done for us we nullify the power of the cross and join ourselves with fallen angels who await the lake of fire.

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