Tag Archives: grace

Good Friday

Behold the Lamb of God

Long before the cross was even an instrument of torture and death there was prophecy concerning a certain death by crucifixion. Psalm 22 is a perfect description of the crucifixion of Jesus:

I am poured out like water,
and all my bones are disjointed;
my heart is like wax,
melting within me.

My strength is dried up like baked clay;
my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth.
You put me into the dust of death.

For dogs have surrounded me;
a gang of evildoers has closed in on me;
they pierced my hands and my feet.

I can count all my bones;
people look and stare at me.

They divided my garments among themselves,
and they cast lots for my clothing.  (Psalm 22:14-18)

What was the purpose for such an agonizing death? The Prophet Isaiah tells us:

He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not.

 Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.

But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.

All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. (Isaiah 53:3-6)

In the face of so great a sacrifice on our behalf what are we to do?

Therefore, brothers, since we have boldness to enter the sanctuary through the blood of Jesus, by the new and living way that He has inaugurated for us, through the curtain (that is, His flesh); and since we have a great high priest over the house of God, let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience and our bodies washed in pure water.  (Hebrews 10:19-23)

The cross always brings us to the point of decision. We cannot look away from it. We must look upon the Lamb of God in His agony if we are ever to be set free. What does the cross of Christ mean to us today? Is Good Friday a good day for us?

The day was a day of agony for Jesus, but it was also a day of triumph. He defeat sin, the grace, and Hell. Is his victory our victory? Not if we look away. We must see the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

See, my servant shall prosper; he shall be exalted and liftedup, and shall be very high.   (Isaiah 52:13)

Jesus told his disciples:

Now is the judgment of this world; now the ruler of this world will be driven out. And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” He said this to indicate the kind of death he was to die.   (John 12:31-33)

Are we drawn to Jesus this day? Are we drawn to his cross? He is our only hope of redemption and salvation. This day is a good day for all who believe in him.

And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.   (John 3:14-15)

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Saturday in the Second Week of Lent

Amazing Grace

How do we respond to God’s amazing grace? Scripture tells us that we have all fallen short of the glory of God. We are all in desperate need of his grace. Yet, the Pharisees had great difficulty with the fact that Jesus ate with tax collectors and sinners. Such thinking suggests that there should be limits on God’s grace.

We are familiar with parable of The Prodigal Son. He wasted his inheritance on riotous living. When the Father accepted his return that was one thing. But when the Father had a great celebration for him and killed the fatted calf, then that was quite another thing for the Father’s eldest son:

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. 26 He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him. But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends.   (Luke 15:26-29)

Where was the fairness? Do we become jealous of those of whom God has chosen to bless? None of us are worthy of his blessing. If Gos has forgiven us, are we to keep score on others?

One of the greatest blessings we have received from the Lord is the freedom to allow others to be blessed by God. Or are we to instruct God on how he should dispense his amazing grace?

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Saturday in the First Week of Lent

Covenant Keeping

The children of Israel are a covenant people. God made great promises to them which would be fulfilled as long as they kept his commandments:

This very day the Lord your God is commanding you to observe these statutes and ordinances; so observe them diligently with all your heart and with all your soul. Today you have obtained the Lord’s agreement: to be your God; and for you to walk in his ways, to keep his statutes, his commandments, and his ordinances, and to obey him. Today the Lord has obtained your agreement: to be his treasured people, as he promised you, and to keep his commandments; for him to set you high above all nations that he has made, in praise and in fame and in honor; and for you to be a people holy to the Lord your God, as he promised.   (Deuteronomy 26:16–19)

As Christians we are also a covenant people. We are in-grafted into the promises God made to Israel by our faith in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Our covenant with God is better than the Old Covenant that God made with Abraham. Nonetheless, we are still required to live by faith as was Abraham.

Yes, we have great promises and blessings, but with them come responsibilities. Living by faith means trusting in Jesus to supply us with grace to help us to keep the commandments of God. In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus made it very clear that we are to obey all the commandments from the heart. He said:

Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.   (Matthew 5:48)

We have not been given a blank check to live any way we want. Our Covenant with God under the blood of Jesus does not cover deliberate sin:

If we deliberately keep on sinning after we have received the knowledge of the truth, no sacrifice for sins is left, but only a fearful expectation of judgment and of raging fire that will consume the enemies of God.   (Hebrews 10:26-27)

Do we consider ourselves a treasured people, holy to God? If so, we will find great joy in keeping the commandments as God supplies us with his grace.

Happy are they whose way is blameless,
who walk in the law of the LORD!

Happy are they who observe his decrees
and seek him with all their hearts!   (Psalm 119:1–2)

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Friday in the First Week of Lent

Fairness

Jesus told the parable of the workers in the field. The ones who worked only the last h0ur got the same wages that the ones who worked all day long. The early workers thought that their pay was unfair. They were not prepared for the master’s response:

Take what belongs to you and go; I choose to give to this last the same as I give to you. Am I not allowed to do what I choose with what belongs to me? Or are you envious because I am generous?’ So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”   (Matthew 20:14-16)

Some of us are late bloomers. Thanks be to God for his mercy! God does not judge the way we judge. He does not keep score by the amount of work we do for him. Rather, he judges the heart. Love does not keep a record of wrongs, but rejoices in the right (1 Corinthians 13:5-6). If we need a theological explanation then here it is:

Yet you say, “The way of the Lord is unfair.” Hear now, O house of Israel: Is my way unfair? Is it not your ways that are unfair? When the righteous turn away from their righteousness and commit iniquity, they shall die for it; for the iniquity that they have committed they shall die. Again, when the wicked turn away from the wickedness they have committed and do what is lawful and right, they shall save their life. Because they considered and turned away from all the transgressions that they had committed, they shall surely live; they shall not die.   (Ezekiel 18:25-28)

It is time for us to give up score-keeping on others, and even on ourselves. The Psalmist wrote:

If you, LORD, were to note what is done amiss,
O Lord, who could stand?   (Psalm 130:2)

Jesus said:

So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled to your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.   (Matthew 5:23-24)

The Gospel should free us from all score-keeping because we have been cleansed by the blood of Jesus. We should then forgive others and seek their forgiveness as well.

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