Tag Archives: Good Shepherd

Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year B

The Good Shepherd

In this world we are either hired hands or true shepherds. Jesus said:

“I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. The hired hand, who is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away—and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. The hired hand runs away because a hired hand does not care for the sheep.”   (John 10:11-13)

Fortunately, for us, Jesus was not a hired hand. He went the distance for us, even to dying on a cruel cross. He is our example. The Apostle John tells us that we are to emulate Jesus:

We know love by this, that he laid down his life for us — and we ought to lay down our lives for one another. How does God’s love abide in anyone who has the world’s goods and sees a brother or sister in need and yet refuses help?   (1 John 3:16-17)

What keeps us from doing this? The answer may be that we do not know Jesus as our shepherd. In this challenging world we face many dangers and upsetting circumstances. It is easy to become so much concerned for ourselves that we have little time and energy for others. King David wrote a psalm that reminds us who our caretaker is:

The Lord is my shepherd;
I shall not be in want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures
and leads me beside still waters.

He revives my soul
and guides me along right pathways for his Name’s sake.

Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I shall fear no evil;
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

You spread a table before me in the presence of those who trouble me;
you have anointed my head with oil,
and my cup is running over.

Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.   (Psalm 23)

In today’s first reading, the chief priests tried to get Peter and John to abandon their faith in Christ Jesus. That wa

If we this day are judged for a good deed done to a helpless man, by what means he has been made well, let it be known to you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead, by Him this man stands here before you whole. This is the ‘stone which was rejected by you builders, which has become the chief cornerstone.’ Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.”   (Acts 4:9-12)

Abandoning Jesus was not an option for Peter and John, regardless of the circumstances in which they found themselves. Is Jesus our cornerstone? Is he the author and finisher of our faith? Are we willing to abandoned all our personal cares and trust Jesus as our good shepherd. The Apostle Peter wrote:

Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, so that he may exalt you in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him, because he cares for you.   (1 Peter 5{6-7)

The Apostle Paul echos Peter:

Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 4:5-7)

Jesus is our peace and freedom from anxiety. Without him we can do nothing. We cannot love others without first loving our Lord. When we bathe in his love, mercy, and forgiveness, his love flows out from us to others. His love never fails. He is the good shepherd who will never leave his sheep.

Paul wrote:

For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.   (Romans 8:38-39)

Apart from Jesus we are just hired hands at best. When the going gets tough we may abandon our Lord. But we are not hired hands. We are the under-shepherds of Christ. Let us go out and love others into the kingdom of God.

Leave a comment

Filed under Easter, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B