Tag Archives: God the Father

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 13C

Track 1: I Took Them up in My Arms

Hosea 11:1-11
Psalm 107:1-9, 43
Colossians 3:1-11
Luke 12:13-21

The Children of Israel were not just the children of Israel. They were the Children of God. This is how God describes them to the Prophet Hosea:

When Israel was a child, I loved him,
    and out of Egypt I called my son.
The more I called them,
    the more they went from me;
they kept sacrificing to the Baals,
    and offering incense to idols.

Yet it was I who taught Ephraim to walk,
    I took them up in my arms;
    but they did not know that I healed them.
I led them with cords of human kindness,
    with bands of love.
I was to them like those
    who lift infants to their cheeks.
    I bent down to them and fed them.   (Hosea 11:1-11)

When Jesus went up to Jerusalem one last time to face his crucifixion, he stopped to weep over the city:

Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!   (Matthew 23:37)

In the days of Hosea, Israel had turned away from God. Over and over again, Israel continued to do so, even to the point of crucifying God’s own Son. Did they not realize that it was God who fed them, protected them, and delivered them in times of trouble?

The psalmist wrote:

They were hungry and thirsty;
their spirits languished within them.

Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,
and he delivered them from their distress.

He put their feet on a straight path
to go to a city where they might dwell.

Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy
and the wonders he does for his children.   (Psalm 107:5-8)

God is the Father of Israel. He is also our Father. He is the Father of all things. What father does not want to provide for his children, does not want to look after them, protect them, and teach them? Have we every experienced our own children ignore us or push us away at times? If so, how did that make us feel?

Unfortunately, it seems, that part of our human nature is to want to prove to ourselves that we can get along on our own. Not only did Israel forsake their Father. At times in our lives we have done the same. God patiently waits for us to return to him. He is our loving Father He wants us to discover, on our own, that we need him.

What happens if we continually we ignore the truth? Insecurity starts to set in. Worry and anxiety may then overtake us.

In today’s Gospel Jesus tells that parable about the rich fool. He tears down his barns and builds bigger barns to store up supplies for the future. Are riches ever enough? For a moment the rich fool is able to bask in his wealth. But things quickly change for him. From Luke:

I will say to my soul, `Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’ But God said to him, `You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”  (Luke 12:19-21)

Greed is not the only reason for wanting to amass a fortune. The future is uncertain. Without God, things will always be uncertain. Our earthly riches, whatever they may be, will ultimately fail us. But we have greater riches which God has given us . He has given us his only begotten Son to secure our future, both for now and for an eternity. Today, where is our treasure?

God still wants to take us in his arms. Will we let him today? Can we find in our hearts a love for God, the one who loves us and will never fail us?

 

 

Track 2: Heavenly Treasure

Ecclesiastes 1:2, 12-14; 2:18-23
Psalm 49:1-11
Colossians 3:1-11
Luke 12:13-21

In today’s Gospel Jesus tells the parable of the rich fool:

“The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, `What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, `I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, `Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’ But God said to him, `You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”   (Luke 12:16-21)

King Solomon echos a similar theme in Ecclesiastes:

I turned and gave my heart up to despair concerning all the toil of my labors under the sun, because sometimes one who has toiled with wisdom and knowledge and skill must leave all to be enjoyed by another who did not toil for it. This also is vanity and a great evil.   (Ecclesiastes 2:20-21)

A crude paraphrase might be: You cannot take it with you. Worldly riches are eventually cut off by death alone, if not otherwise. The psalmist writes:

The wickedness of those who put their trust in their goods,
and boast of their great riches?

We can never ransom ourselves,
or deliver to God the price of our life;

For the ransom of our life is so great,
that we should never have enough to pay it,

In order to live for ever and ever,
and never see the grave.

For we see that the wise die also;
like the dull and stupid they perish
and leave their wealth to those who come after them.   (Psalm 49:5-9)

Death is a great obstacle. It is a fact of life that we cannot overcome. There is only one person that has defeated death – the Lord Jesus Christ who died on a cross and rose again on the third day. Because of his victory we, too, can now overcome death.

The Apostle Paul explains that we have been buried with Christ in our baptism. When we identify with the death of Christ we no longer live to ourselves. We now have a new life in him through his resurrection. From today’s Epistle:

If you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth, for you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When C.hrist who is your life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory.   (Colossians 3:1-4)

Our riches is not of this world. We are destined for a glorious life which is eternal. Are we still storying up treasures on earth? This earth is passing away. Our old lives have already passed away if we are in Christ. Paul tells us not to look back, but to look above. We are now living in the resurrection. Death has lost its power.

Paul writes:

When this perishable body puts on imperishability, and this mortal body puts on immortality, then the saying that is written will be fulfilled:

“Death has been swallowed up in victory.”
“Where, O death, is your victory?
    Where, O death, is your sting?”   (1 Corinthians 15:54-56)

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First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday

The Ministry of the Holy Trinity 

Today it is Trinity Sunday. It has been said that if anyone is able to explain the Holy Trinity they are probably a heretic. To be sure, the Trinity is certainly difficult to explain, or even to understand. Yet the scriptures clearly depict God in three persons. In today’s readings we have glimpses of how the three person of the Godhead interact with each other.

Let us first look at the act of creation. From Genesis:

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form, and void; and darkness [a]was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.   (Genesis 1:1-2)

Here we have a picture of the Holy Spirit waiting to carry out the plans of the God the Father. We see that the Spirit was there in the beginning. He is often referred to as the Wisdom of God. Reading from Proverbs:

Does not wisdom call,
and does not understanding raise her voice?

On the heights, beside the way,
at the crossroads she takes her stand;

beside the gates in front of the town,
at the entrance of the portals she cries out:

“To you, O people, I call,
and my cry is to all that live.

The Lord created me at the beginning of his work,
the first of his acts of long ago.

Ages ago I was set up,
at the first, before the beginning of the earth.

When he established the heavens, I was there,
when he drew a circle on the face of the deep,

when he made firm the skies above,
when he established the fountains of the deep,

when he assigned to the sea its limit,
so that the waters might not transgress his command,

when he marked out the foundations of the earth,
then I was beside him, like a master worker;

and I was daily his delight,
rejoicing before him always,

rejoicing in his inhabited world
and delighting in the human race.”   (Proverbs 8:1-4, 22-31)

Notice that the Spirit to took delight in the creation of humankind. The Spirit was very much involved in the creation. God the Father spoke to each Person of the Trinity when he said: “Let us.”

Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”   (Genesis 1:26)

Where was God the Son in all this? Reading from the first chapter of John’s Gospel:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

Jesus, the Word of God,  is said to be the agent of creation. Not only that, he became the Word made flesh. He entered into his own creation of our behalf.

It the Holy Trinity some theological concept far above our understanding? No, the Trinity is Emmanuel, God with us. The Trinity impinges upon our daily lives. How is that so? From today’s reading from John:

Jesus said to the disciples, “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own, but will speak whatever he hears, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, because he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine. For this reason I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.”   (John 16:12-15)

By the Holy Spirit, God will share his very essence with us. The Spirit will share all that the God the Father has – the very essence that was been given to Jesus and give it to us. Are we ready to move beyond gauge spiritual concepts and move into fellowship with all of God? This is our heritage.

The psalmist writes:

When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers,
the moon and the stars you have set in their courses,

What is man that you should be mindful of him?
the son of man that you should seek him out?

You have made him but little lower than the angels;
you adorn him with glory and honor.   (Psalm 8:4-6)

God wants to adorn us with glory and honor. Do we believe that? If so, are we boldly ready to claim our inheritance? The Apostle Paul writes:

Since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand; and we boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God. And not only that, but we also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.   (Romans 5:1-5)

We are destined to share the glory of God. It is not something that we alone can accomplish. The Holy Trinity is working on our behalf. We need all three Persons of the Trinity. We need the commandments of God the Father. He has set the standard which will never change. He requires us to be holy. We need the ministry of God the Son to forgive us and remit all our sins as we confess them to God. By our faith alone Jesus continues to work on our behalf, interceding for us before the Father. We need the Holy Spirit, the third person of the God Head, to implant the law of God in our hearts and empower us for service. Jesus is returning for a Church without spot or wrinkle.

Have we in the Church been faithful in teaching the fullness of the Gospel? If we have left out anyone the Persons of the Trinity then we need to make some corrections. We should not dissect the Gospel into Liturgical, Evangelical, and Pentecostal. We need all three. Trinity Sunday asks us to look at the whole of the Gospel.

Thanks be to God for the sacred work of the Holy Trinity. God is still forming us into his image. The world around us is working to undermine what God is doing. This world is passing away. God will create a new heaven and a new earth. Let us put our whole trust in God alone.

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Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C