Tag Archives: God the Father

Fifth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 7B

Track 1: Now Is the Acceptable Time

1 Samuel 17: (1a, 4-11, 19-23), 32-49
Psalm 9:9-20
or
1 Samuel 17:57-18:5, 10-16
Psalm 133

2 Corinthians 6:1-13
Mark 4:35-41

In life we can face great obstacles, tests, and trials. David was facing a great challenge which might seem beyond him or any Israeli: The giant Goliath. Goliath was a massive Philistine soldier. He was prepared to fight anyone from Israel who was willing to face him. The victor would determine the fate of the two nations. From 1 Samuel we read:

David said to Saul, “Let no one’s heart fail because of him; your servant will go and fight with this Philistine.” Saul said to David, “You are not able to go against this Philistine to fight with him; for you are just a boy, and he has been a warrior from his youth.” But David said to Saul, “Your servant used to keep sheep for his father; and whenever a lion or a bear came, and took a lamb from the flock, I went after it and struck it down, rescuing the lamb from its mouth; and if it turned against me, I would catch it by the jaw, strike it down, and kill it. Your servant has killed both lions and bears; and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, since he has defied the armies of the living God.” David said, “The Lord, who saved me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear, will save me from the hand of this Philistine.” So Saul said to David, “Go, and may the Lord be with you!”   (1 Samuel 17:32-37)

For David, preparation was the key. He had faced dangerous situation in the past and he knew that he could call on God for help. God would answer him and come to his aid as he had done so many times before. David was prepared for an immediate response to Goliath. He was ready because he knew that God was with him and that God was ready.

Are we ready to face our Goliath’s? We cannot and should not do it alone. God must be with us. Do we have the confidence that David had that God is on our side and we are on his side?

Maybe we have not been faithful in our walk with God. Maybe we have not cultivated a personal relationship with God that David had done. We might think: If only we had done so, then we would have been prepared for the crisis. The good news of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is that, though we may not be ready, God is still ready. The Apostle Paul wrote:

As we work together with Christ, we urge you also not to accept the grace of God in vain. For he says,

“At an acceptable time I have listened to you,
and on a day of salvation I have helped you.”

See, now is the acceptable time; see, now is the day of salvation!   (2 Corinthians 6:1-2)

God is an immediate God. He is ready to act now. Are we ready? Are we ready to abandon in notion that we might that we can navigate our lives without him? The disciples of Jesus had to learn this lesson. In Mark’s Gospel we read:

A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But Jesus was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. 40 He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?”   (Mark 4:37-39)

Jesus was in the boat with his disciples. Is he in our boat? If he is not then we should invite him in – right now. Now is the acceptable time!

 

 

Track 2: Peace! Be Still!

Job 38:1-11
Psalm 107:1-3, 23-32
2 Corinthians 6:1-13
Mark 4:35-41

In today’s gospel reading the disciples of Jesus were facing a dangerous windstorm. The boat they were end was in danger of capsizing. Form Mark’s Gospel we read:

When evening had come, Jesus said to his disciples, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”  (Mark 4:35-41)

The disciples of Jesus were seasoned fishermen. They were aware of the destructive nature of the storm they were facing. What makes such storms of nature scary? They can get out of hand. We are not able to control such storms. We need a safe escape plan. Will there be enough warning and time to escape?

There are other kinds of storms in life. Everything seems to be falling apart at times. Job was facing such a storm. He knew that only God could help him. But would God help him? Would God still be able to make a difference at such an advanced stage of the crisis he was facing. He was at his wit’s end, so to speak. Job had run out of piously correct prayers. He cried out to God in desperation.

Job was not prepared for God’s answer:

The Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind:

“Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge?

Gird up your loins like a man,
I will question you, and you shall declare to me.

“Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?
Tell me, if you have understanding.   (Job 38:1-4)

In a similar state, the disciples of Jesus were facing a grave crisis. They were aso not prepared for Jesus’ answer: “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?”

What might be missing in both of these storms? God is in charge of everything, including storms. God the Father laid the foundation of the earth. He is the creator of the entire universe. God the Son was the very agent of creation. In John’s Gospel we read:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being.   (John 1:1-3)

Jesus could rebuke the wind because Jesus formed the wind. God was in control of the world because he created the world. This meant that God was also in control of the circumstances in which Job found himself. Is God in control of our circumstance? Or do we find ourselves in a storm which we believe may be out of control?

Jesus was in the boat with his disciples. They were not alone. He spoke to the storm: “Peace! Be still!” Is Jesus in our boat? He is if we call upon him. The psalmist wrote:

The Lord is a stronghold for the oppressed,
a stronghold in times of trouble.
And those who know your name put their trust in you,
for you, O Lord, have not forsaken those who seek you.   (Psalm 9:9-10)

And again:

The Lord is your keeper;
    the Lord is your shade at your right hand.
The sun shall not strike you by day,
    nor the moon by night.

The Lord will keep you from all evil;
    he will keep your life.
The Lord will keep
    your going out and your coming in
    from this time on and forevermore.   (Psalm 121:5-8)

In our lifetime our faith will be tested. But we have this assurance from our Lord:

I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution. But take courage; I have conquered the world!”   (John 16:33)

He will never leave us or forsake us. Let us never abandon our hope in him.

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St. Philip and St. James

Greater Works Ministry

Today we celebrate the lives and ministries of the Apostles Philip and James, son of Alphaeus, often called “the Less.” James was called this name to distinguish him from James, the brother of John. Little is known about him. We know that he was chosen by Jesus and that he was among the twelve disciples on the Day of Pentecost. He was possibly an early witness to the resurrection if he is the James as recorded in 1 Corinthians 15:7.

James the Less was martyred for the Faith because he would not renounce Jesus as required by the Jewish high priest. Thus, James was faithful to the end and serves as an example for us all. Without the commitment of James, and others like him, we would not have the Church today.

Let us now turn to the Apostle Philip. In today’s New Testament reading, he seems to be having doubts when he asked Jesus a very important question:

Philip said to him, “Lord, show us the Father, and we will be satisfied.” Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you all this time, Philip, and you still do not know me? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, `Show us the Father’? Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works. Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; but if you do not, then believe me because of the works themselves. Very truly, I tell you, the one who believes in me will also do the works that I do and, in fact, will do greater works than these, because I am going to the Father. I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If in my name you ask me for anything, I will do it.”   (John 14:8-14)

When the words of Jesus sank in this same Philip became a great evangelist. He began performing the “greater works” which Jesus promised. The signs and wonders he performed made a great impact on the people of Samaria when he preached the word there:

Those who had been scattered preached the word wherever they went. Philip went down to a city in Samaria and proclaimed the Messiah there. When the crowds heard Philip and saw the signs he performed, they all paid close attention to what he said. For with shrieks, impure spirits came out of many, and many who were paralyzed or lame were healed. So there was great joy in that city.   (Acts 8:4-8)

How did the skeptic Philip grow into such a powerful evangelist? He meditated on the teachings of Jesus. Jesus explained that the greater works that Philip and others were called to do would be accomplished in the same manner as Jesus accomplished them in his own ministry on earth. Jesus said:

“The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works.”   (John 14:10)

Jesus did not do the works. God the Father, in him, did the works. This may sound strange but we remember that the Son of God gave up all his divinity and spiritual power when he came to the earth. Jesus relied on prayer and his close relationship with the Father.

Are we ready to step into the “greater works” ministry? We must first step into Jesus and the Father by faith. Then we must receive the promise from the Father which is the Holy Spirit. If a skeptic like Philip could answer the call then why should we remain a skeptic when there is an exciting ministry ahead waiting for us?

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First Sunday after Christmas: Year B

Sons and Daughters of God

Should God be called our Father? Jesus got into a dialogue with the Pharisees over this question. He was explaining to his disciples that they must continue in the Word of God in order to know the truth and then be set free:

“If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples; and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.”   (John 8:31-32)

Jesus was speaking about being set free from the power of sin. The Pharisees objected to what Jesus was saying because, in their minds, they were already set free. After all, they were descendants of Abraham. Jesus challenged their statement by telling them they had another father all together:

Jesus said to them, “If you were Abraham’s children, you would do the works of Abraham.But now you seek to kill Me, a Man who has told you the truth which I heard from God. Abraham did not do this. You do the deeds of your father.”

Then they said to Him, “We were not born of fornication; we have one Father—God.”

Jesus said to them, “If God were your Father, you would love Me, for I proceeded forth and came from God; nor have I come of Myself, but He sent Me. Why do you not understand My speech? Because you are not able to listen to My word. You are of your father the devil, and the desires of your father you want to do. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he speaks a lie, he speaks from his own resources, for he is a liar and the father of it.   (John 8:39-44)

Sin separates us from God which precludes God from being our spiritual Father. We broke away from God as Father when we chose to serve the god of this world. At the beginning of his Gospel John explains what is required to get back to God being our Father:

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.   (John 1:10-13)

God, through drastic measures, adopted us as his sons and daughters. The Apostle Paul writes about this adoption:

But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God.   (Galatians 4:4-7)

In order to be adopted by God we must be willing to received the Holy Spirit in our hearts. The adoption process takes us out of the world on sin and places us in a new home created by his Son. This process is carried out over time. Jesus said that we must continue in his word. We need the power of the Holy Spirit to become the children of God. Becoming is a process.

We need to understand how this adoption works. God has chosen us. We must be willing to choose the One who gave himself up for our adoption. We must continually choose Jesus over the god of this world. That is something the Pharisees were unwilling to do. In their minds, they had already arrived. How many Christians believe this same thing today? How many churches teach it.

Are we still a slave to sin? If we are then we must continue to cry out: “Abba! Father!” God will change ours hearts when we cry out to him. Jesus said:

“So I say to you, Ask, and it will be given you; search, and you will find; knock, and the door will be opened for you. For everyone who asks receives, and everyone who searches finds, and for everyone who knocks, the door will be opened. Is there anyone among you who, if your child asks for a fish, will give a snake instead of a fish? Or if the child asks for an egg, will give a scorpion? If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit[f] to those who ask him!”   (Luke 11:9-13)

God gives us power to overcome sin. He gives us power to become the children of God. He gives power to those who continue in his Word. If we call him Father, then we must go to him and not the god of this world. He has adopted us through the blood of his Son. Have we received his adoption?

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