Tag Archives: God the Father

First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday, Year A

A Trinitarian Understanding of God

God is a trinitarian God. We need to see him in his full dimension.

Let us observe God as creator. In the beginning, God the Father consulted God the Son and God the Holy Spirit about humankind. He said: “Let us make humankind in our likeness.”

Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”   (Genesis 1:26-27)

Each aspect of God had a role to play in creation. The Son of God was the agent of creation. In the Gospel of John we read:

 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people.   (John 1:1-4)

God the Father spoke life through his Son. The Holy Spirit also played a very important role. He carried out his assignment to bring everything into being by his power. In Genesis we read:

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.   (Genesis 1:1-2)

God has revealed himself to us through his creation. He did so by exercising his total being in the process. Thus, we cannot just relate to one part of God while ignoring his other attributes.

The Apostle Paul helps us to understand how God moves through the Trinity of his being:

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.   (2 Corinthians 13:13)

In this one blessing by Paul to the church in Corinth, we are able to see deep insights into God’s nature and character. God the Father is pure love. He best expresses that love through the grace he gives us through his Son. Jesus reveals the character of the Father. He is the voice of the Father, the Word made flesh. Jesus is the self-giving God. He sacrifices himself that we mighty have salvation in his name. We have fellowship and communion with the Father and Son through the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit hovers over us just as he hovered the formless world. He has been given to us to bring us in alignment with God’s will and restore us to fellowship with the Father.

In his last words to his disciples Jesus spoke of baptizing believers by the fullness God as expressed in the Holy Trinity. In the Gospel of Matthew we read:

The eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”   (Matthew 28:16-20)

Notice in this great commission the working of the Holy Trinity. The Church must teach all believers to obey all that Jesus has taught. Jesus, the voice of God, had taught us the true nature of God the Father and the essence of his commandments. But the power of the Holy Spirit is needed to help us to understand and obey all that Jesus has taught us.

Today’s reading from the Gospel of Matthew echoes Paul’s blessing to the Church in Corinth. Both declare the working of God through his trinitarian nature. Without and understanding of the Holy Trinity we are left without a very shallow faith indeed. While it is true that we cannot fully understand all the aspects of the Trinity, we can neither afford to ignore the Trinity. It is the Holy Trinity that helps us to focus our faith in God.

The good news is that the three persons of the Godhead are still working for us. They are still creating. Soon we shall see the culmination of their work when we are fully restored to the likeness of God. Let us be encouraged and not lose heart. Rather, let us hold onto a holy hope that God is at work in us and that he will fulfill all of his purposes for us. Amen.

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Filed under Holy Trinity, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year A

St. Philip and St. James

Greater Works Ministry

Today we celebrate the lives and ministries of the Apostles Philip and James, son of Alphaeus, often called “the Less.” He was called this name to distinguish him from James, the brother of John. Little is known about him. We know that he was chosen by Jesus and that he was among the twelve disciples on the Day of Pentecost. He was possibly an early witness to the resurrection if he is the James as recorded in 1 Corinthians 15:7.

James the Less was martyred for the Faith because he would not renounce Jesus as required by the Jewish high priest. Thus, James was faithful to the end and serves as an example for us all. Without the commitment of James and others like him we would not have the Church today.

Let us now turn to the Apostle Philip. In today’s New Testament reading, he seems to be having doubts when he asked Jesus a very important question:

Philip said to him, “Lord, show us the Father, and we will be satisfied.” Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you all this time, Philip, and you still do not know me? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, `Show us the Father’? Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works. Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; but if you do not, then believe me because of the works themselves. Very truly, I tell you, the one who believes in me will also do the works that I do and, in fact, will do greater works than these, because I am going to the Father. I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If in my name you ask me for anything, I will do it.”   (John 14:8-14)

When the words of Jesus sank in this same Philip became a great evangelist. He began performing the “greater works” which Jesus promised. The signs and wonders he performed made a great impact on the people of Samaria when he preached the word there:

Those who had been scattered preached the word wherever they went. Philip went down to a city in Samaria and proclaimed the Messiah there. When the crowds heard Philip and saw the signs he performed, they all paid close attention to what he said. For with shrieks, impure spirits came out of many, and many who were paralyzed or lame were healed. So there was great joy in that city.   (Acts 8:4-8)

How did the skeptic Philip grow into such a powerful ministry? He meditated on the teachings of Jesus. Jesus explained that the greater works that Philip and others were called to do would be accomplished in the same manner as Jesus’ own ministry on earth. Jesus did not do the works. He explained:

“The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works.”   (John 14:10)

Are we ready to step into the “greater works” ministry? We must first step into Jesus and the Father by faith. Then we must receive the promise from the Father which is the Holy Spirit. If a skeptic like Philip could answer the call then why should we remain a skeptic when there is an exciting ministry ahead?

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