Tag Archives: eternal life

Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year C

The Water of Life

Who are we following today? There are many voices promising many things, but can they deliver? And what do they actually have to give? There is only one person who can deliver eternal life. Are we listening to his voice? The Pharisees and scribes were not:

The Jews gathered around him and said to him, “How long will you keep us in suspense? If you are the Messiah, tell us plainly.” Jesus answered, “I have told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in my Father’s name testify to me; but you do not believe, because you do not belong to my sheep. My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of my hand.   (John 10:24-28)

The shepherd boy who wrote this psalm listened to the voice of shepherd greater than him. David said:

The Lord is my shepherd;
I shall not be in want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures
and leads me beside still waters.

He revives my soul
and guides me along right pathways for his Name’s sake.   (Psalm 23:1-3)

Who is our shepherd? Whose voice are we listening to? There is only one voice that gives a drink from the water or like. Are we thirsty for this gift? John, the revelator writes:

Then one of the elders addressed me, saying, “Who are these, robed in white, and where have they come from?” I said to him, “Sir, you are the one that knows.” Then he said to me, “These are they who have come out of the great ordeal; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.

For this reason they are before the throne of God,
and worship him day and night within his temple,
and the one who is seated on the throne will shelter them.

They will hunger no more, and thirst no more;
the sun will not strike them,
nor any scorching heat;

for the Lamb at the center of the throne will be their shepherd,
and he will guide them to springs of the water of life,

and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes.”   (Revelation 7:13-17)

There is a gift that brings us eternal life. But we must follow the Good Shepherd. We must listen to his voice. He is the one who leads us to this gift.

We remember the encounter that Jesus had with a Samaritan woman at the well. She wonder why a Jew would be asking her to give him water because Jews did not speak with Samaritans.

Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” The woman said to him, “Sir, you have no bucket, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? Are you greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us the well, and with his sons and his flocks drank from it?” Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but those who drink of the water that I will give them will never be thirsty. The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.”   (John 4:10-14)

What is this gift that Jesus talks about? The Gospel of John tells us:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water.’” Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive; for as yet there was no Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified.   (John 7:37-39)

Jesus purchased this gift for us by his sacrifice on a cruel cross. Do we want it? If so, then we must follow the Good Shepherd. We must listen to his voice. We must follow where he leads us. We must put our full faith and trust in him.

Distracting voices with vain promises can stand in the way. One the most distracting voices is the voice of religion. We remember when Jesus confronted the woman at the well about the life she was living. She answered him this way:

The woman said to him, “Sir, I see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you say that the place where people must worship is in Jerusalem.”   (John 4:19-20)

Jesus quickly dismissed any questions about religion:

Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father seeks such as these to worship him. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming” (who is called Christ). “When he comes, he will proclaim all things to us.” Jesus said to her, “I am he, the one who is speaking to you.”   (John 4:21-26)

The woman’s conversion followed because she put religion aside and listened to the voice of the Good Shepherd. Today is the hour for us to focus on what is real and lasting. In a time of confusing voices we must learn to hear the Master’s voice. Jesus said:

My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish.   (John 10:27-28)

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C

Resurrection Sunday: Principal Service, Year C

The Resurrection of the Dead

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

What a discovery it must have been for the women whom God had chosen to be the first witnesses of the resurrection. From the Gospel of Luke we read:

On the first day of the week, at early dawn, the women who had come with Jesus from Galilee came to the tomb, taking the spices that they had prepared. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in, they did not find the body. While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men in dazzling clothes stood beside them. The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen. Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.”   (Luke 24:4-7)

The women  were asked a very important question by the angels who were at the tomb: “Why do you look for the living among the dead?” Jesus had defeated death. Death could not contain him. They were looking in the place where they expected to see Jesus. But they were looking in the wrong place. He was no longer there.

From Isaiah we read:

And he will destroy on this mountain
    the shroud that is cast over all peoples,
    the sheet that is spread over all nations;
    he will swallow up death forever.   (Isaiah 25:7-8)

A shroud had been cast over all people. This a covering that weighs us down. We can imagine an infinite life. It is something most people would want. But we cannot achieve it on our own. We eventually die.

Some are saying that our consciousness could morph into a computer chip somehow. Is there a way to become immortal? Humankind keeps search. What is standing in our way?

God had told Adam and Eve that they could eat fruit from any tree in Garden of Eden except one tree. If they ate of that tree they would die. We remember how Satan tricked Eve:

But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”   (Genesis 3:4-5)

Satan lied when he said she would not die, He enticed her to sin and sin is what caused death. Science looks for a wisdom around death. Satan promised we would have the wisdom of God. But our so-called wisdom falls short. We cannot defeat death.

Does science offer us hope of immortality? Can we discover the miracle cure that extends our lives indefinitely? Many people are looking in the wrong place. Such wishful thinking is really a denial of the consequences of sin. No one can solve the problem of death who does not first solve the problem of sin. Jesus has solved them both.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have died. For since death came through a human being, the resurrection of the dead has also come through a human being; for as all die in Adam, so all will be made alive in Christ. But each in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then at his coming those who belong to Christ. Then comes the end, when he hands over the kingdom to God the Father, after he has destroyed every ruler and every authority and power. For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. The last enemy to be destroyed is death.   (1 Corinthians 15:19-26)

Only Jesus can destroy death. He came into the world that death and the fear of death would be eradicated, along with the cause of death, which is our sin.

Today, are we looking for the living among the dead? This world is fleeting. It has no answers concerning death. Where are we looking for life? Are we looking to the one who promises us life, and life more abundantly?

Apostle Peter, by revelation from God, gained an understanding of the resurrection is for everyone. When God revealed to him that even Gentiles could be saved, he proclaimed:

They put Jesus to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”   (Acts 10:39-43)

The resurrection of Jesus Christ is the answer to death. The grave could not hold Jesus, nor can it hold us who believe in his resurrection.

The Lord has risen indeed! We have been chosen by God to make the same discovery of the women at the tomb. His tomb is empty. The only tomb left is a world without Jesus.

Are we still at the tomb or have we discovered that Jesus has risen from the dead? If we have, let us go and tell someone. Jesus has defeated sin, hell, and the grave. We are set free sin and death.

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Leave a comment

April 21, 2019 · 12:03 am

Wednesday in the Fourth Week of Lent

An Everlasting Kingdom

We live in a very temporary world that is quickly fading away. The danger in this world is to worship the things that merely hint at the glory and majesty of God rather than God himself. The Psalmist wrote:

All your works praise you, O Lord,
and your faithful servants bless you.

They make known the glory of your kingdom
and speak of your power;

That the peoples may know of your power
and the glorious splendor of your kingdom.

Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom;
your dominion endures throughout all ages.   (Psalm 145:10–13)

Jesus said that we must be prepared for an eternal kingdom that does not fade away::

Very truly, I tell you, the hour is coming, and is now here, when the dead will hear the voice of the Son of God, and those who hear will live. For just as the Father has life in himself, so he has granted the Son also to have life in himself; and he has given him authority to execute judgment, because he is the Son of Man. Do not be astonished at this; for the hour is coming when all who are in their graves will hear his voice and will come out—those who have done good, to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil, to the resurrection of condemnation.   (John 5:25-29)

God is still calling his people. He wants to offer us an eternal kingdom guaranteed by his Son. Do we hear this voice?

saying to the prisoners, “Come out,”
    to those who are in darkness, “Show yourselves.”
They shall feed along the ways,
    on all the bare heights shall be their pasture;
10 they shall not hunger or thirst,
    neither scorching wind nor sun shall strike them down,
for he who has pity on them will lead them,
    and by springs of water will guide them.   (Isaiah 49:9–10)

Now is the time to answer God’s call. Let us come out of the darkness of this world and enter into his glorious kingdom and light.

Leave a comment

Filed under Jesus, lectionary, Lent, Lenten daily readings, Lenten study, Year A

Fourth Sunday of Advent: Year C

His Mercy Is for Those Who Fear Him

During this Advent season we have been preparing our hearts for the coming of the Christ Child. Our reparations are all important. They get us into the flow of God’s Spirit. God is the master planner. If we are listening, he is the one who prepares us in every way for this life and for the life to come.

We might be taking our Advent preparation lightly. God does not take his preparation lightly. His preparation for us began long ago. From the Prophet Micah we read:

You, O Bethlehem of Ephrathah,
who are one of the little clans of Judah,

from you shall come forth for me
one who is to rule in Israel,

whose origin is from of old,
from ancient days.   (Micah 5:2-3)

The prophet writes about a Messiah whose “origin is from old.” The Apostle Paul tells us that the Messiah was planned for us from the beginning of time:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, just as he chose us in Christ before the foundation of the world to be holy and blameless before him in love. He destined us for adoption as his children through Jesus Christ, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace that he freely bestowed on us in the Beloved.   (Ephesians 1:3-6)

The children of Israel were trained in a sacrificial system that taught them the seriousness to which God regards sin. Sin brought death into the world for which it must be punished. Jesus has supplanted the sacrifices of lambs because he is the lamb of God that was slain for us. When John the Baptist first saw Jesus he said:

The next day he saw Jesus coming toward him and declared, “Here is the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world! This is he of whom I said, ‘After me comes a man who ranks ahead of me because he was before me.’ ”  (John 1:29-30)

In Hebrews we read:

When Christ came into the world, he said,

“Sacrifices and offerings you have not desired,
but a body you have prepared for me;

in burnt offerings and sin offerings
you have taken no pleasure.

Then I said, ‘See, God, I have come to do your will, O God’
(in the scroll of the book it is written of me).”   (Hebrews 10:5-7)

Mary, the mother of Jesus, could not fully understand what God was preparing through her son, but she willing submitted herself to his divine plans:

“My soul magnifies the Lord,
    and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant.
    Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed;
for the Mighty One has done great things for me,
    and holy is his name.
His mercy is for those who fear him
    from generation to generation.
He has shown strength with his arm;
    he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts.
He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
    and lifted up the lowly;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
    and sent the rich away empty.   (Luke 1:47-55)

Mary gave herself to God, trusting him. We should have a greater understanding now than what Mary did at the time of the birth of Jesus. Are we interring into the preparation that God has made on our behalf? Christianity is not a spectator sport. Christian discipleship is a daily entering into God’s presence through the door which Jesus has provided.

We are not just preparing for Christmas. We are preparing for the age to come. Only Jesus can carry us there. John the Revelator on the Island of Patmos saw a vision of this age:

I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it. Its gates will never be shut by day — and there will be no night there. People will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations. But nothing unclean will enter it, nor anyone who practices abomination or falsehood, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s book of life.   (Revelation 21)

We are shown our destination. It is only through Jesus that the gates of heaven are open. Today, let us heed his voice. He calls to us:

I reprove and discipline those whom I love. Be earnest, therefore, and repent. Listen! I am standing at the door, knocking; if you hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to you and eat with you, and you with me. To the one who conquers I will give a place with me on my throne, just as I myself conquered and sat down with my Father on his throne.   (Revelation 3:19-21)

Are we ready to give praise to God along with the Mother of Jesus:

for the Mighty One has done great things for me,
and holy is his name.

His mercy is for those who fear him
from generation to generation.   (Luke 1:49-50)

Leave a comment

Filed under Advent, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C