Tag Archives: Elijah

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 14A

Track 1: Why Did You Doubt?

Genesis 37:1-4, 12-28
Psalm 105, 1-6, 16-22, 45b
Romans 10:5-15
Matthew 14:22-33

Today we recall one of the great moments in the earthly ministry of Jesus:

Early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.”

Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. But when he noticed the strong wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?”   (Matthew 14:25-31)

Before we become too hard on Peter let us confess that probable none of us have ever walked on water. Jesus asked Peter: “Why did you doubt?” Why did Peter doubt at the last minute? To answer that question we must also answer: “Why do we doubt, sometimes at the last minuet?”

The strong winds and rough seas in life so easily capture our attention. The circumstances around us distract us. We lose our concentration. We quickly forget what God has done and what he is doing now. Jesus had been walking on the water, but that was not the focus of Peter now as he was sinking in the sea.

God led the children of Israel out of Egypt with many signs and wonders. He had parted the Red Sea. But when Moses went up on the mountain to be with God for forty days, the children of Israel quickly forgot what God had done for them. They made a golden calf to worship in his place. They lost their faith at the last minute so to speak.

Fortunately, when we sink into roaring seas of life Jesus does not sink with us. The psalmist reminds us:

Give thanks to the Lord and call upon his Name;
make known his deeds among the peoples.

Sing to him, sing praises to him,
and speak of all his marvelous works.

Glory in his holy Name;
let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice.

Search for the Lord and his strength;
continually seek his face.

Remember the marvels he has done,
his wonders and the judgments of his mouth,   (Psalm 105: 1-5)

Joseph could have easily lost his faith in God when his brothers sold him into slavery in Egypt. We remember that he had been given a dream in which his brothers would one day bow down to him. The psalmist goes on to remind us how this prediction came true:

Until his prediction came to pass,
the word of the Lord tested him.

The king sent and released him;
the ruler of the peoples set him free.

He set him as a master over his household,
as a ruler over all his possessions,   (Psalm 105: 19-21)

Probably very few of us will be tested in the extreme way that Joseph was tested. Nonetheless, our lives are full of tests. How do we respond? Do we forget that we serve a great God who has rescued us in the past? Do we dwell on the difficult circumstances that may surround us? Or do we look up to Jesus?

Peter was going under. He cried out to the Lord: “Save me!” Some of us need to cry out to him today. Now is the time to call upon his name, the name above all names. Now is the time to reach out to him. Now is the hour to cast all our cares upon him. Amen.

 

 

Track 2: Hiding from God

1 Kings 19:9-18
Psalm 85:8-13
Romans 10:5-15
Matthew 14:22-33

The Prophet Elijah was on the Mount of Transfiguration with Jesus and Moses. But in today’s Old Testament reading we find this same prophet hiding in a cave. He had recently had a showdown between himself and the prophets of Baal. As you may recall, he won hands down. Jezebel, however, the wife of King Ahas and worshiper of Baal, threatened his life. Elijah had fled to Mount Horeb to escape:

At Horeb, the mount of God, Elijah came to a cave, and spent the night there. Then the word of the Lord came to him, saying, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He answered, “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”   (1 Kings 19:9-10)

It appears that Elijah had given up all hope. He responds to God’s question with an explanation of what is happening on the ground, so to speak, as if God’s needs his explanation to understand what is going on. What happened to Elijah? Perhaps he took some credit for the humiliation of the prophets of Baal. He was merely God’s messenger. God defeat these prophets.

God responds to Elijah’s concerns:

“Go out and stand on the mountain before the Lord, for the Lord is about to pass by.” Now there was a great wind, so strong that it was splitting mountains and breaking rocks in pieces before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind; and after the wind an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake; and after the earthquake a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire; and after the fire a sound of sheer silence. When Elijah heard it, he wrapped his face in his mantle and went out and stood at the entrance of the cave. Then there came a voice to him that said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He answered, “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”    (1 Kings 19:11-14)

God speaks to Elijah in a still small voice to remind him of how close he is to Elijah and how close he has been always been. Elijah was never alone. God’s word was with him all along. The Apostle Paul echoes this closeness by quoting Moses from the Old Testament:

Moses writes concerning the righteousness that comes from the law, that “the person who does these things will live by them.” But the righteousness that comes from faith says, “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will ascend into heaven?’” (that is, to bring Christ down) “or ‘Who will descend into the abyss?’” (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead). But what does it say?

“The word is near you,
on your lips and in your heart”

(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.   (Romans 10:5-10)

God is with us. He is there for us. We may put our trust in him. But when we rely on ourselves or give ourselves credit for some great accomplishment, we ultimately find ourselves hiding from God, thinking that he is no longer with us. Fear of fighting our battles alone leads can lead us astray. If we are listening, God is calling us to return to him and put our whole faith and trust in him once more.

If we have never known his presence in our lives now is the time to confess him. If we believe that Jesus is Lord of all and that God the Father raised him from the dead, then let us confess: “Jesus is Lord!” If we do not believe then let us ask God to help us to believe. He is very near. We are now living because he is breathing his Spirit into us. He is residing in our hearts right now. All we have to do is call upon his name. Amen.

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Filed under homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year A

The Transfiguration

10trans1-e1298272085244Changed into His Likeness


There was a moment when Jesus manifested His glory on the earth. We long for that moment to happen again. In today’s Gospel we read:

About eight days after Jesus had foretold his death and resurrection, Jesus took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray. And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. (Luke 9:28-29)

God called Moses to come up His holy mountain:

Then Moses went up on the mountain, and the cloud covered the mountain. The glory of the LORD settled on Mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it for six days; on the seventh day he called to Moses out of the cloud. Now the appearance of the glory of the LORD was like a devouring fire on the top of the mountain in the sight of the people of Israel. Moses entered the cloud, and went up on the mountain. Moses was on the mountain for forty days and forty nights. (Exodus 24:15-18)

Something happens on the mount of God. His presence and His glory are there. God’s glory is like a “devouring fire.” It changes the participant. When Moses returned to the people his face shown with the glory of God.

Peter was on the mount of transfiguration. This was not just a metaphorical experience. It was an actual event. We have his testimony in his own words:

We did not follow cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we had been eyewitnesses of his majesty. For he received honor and glory from God the Father when that voice was conveyed to him by the Majestic Glory, saying, “This is my Son, my Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.” (2 Peter 1″16-17)

God calls us up to His holy mount for a purpose – His purpose! There are those who are merely looking for spiritual thrills. False churches and false revivals have been birthed by misunderstandings and misinterpretations of the Holy. Many have been led astray by lying spirits and false angels because they were seeking signs and wonders rather than the Lord Jesus Christ, not realizing that Satan himself can disguise himself as an angel of light. The Apostle Paul reminds us:

Do not let anyone who delights in false humility and the worship of angels disqualify you.Such a person also goes into great detail about what they have seen; they are puffed up with idle notions by their unspiritual mind. They have lost connection with the head, from whom the whole body, supported and held together by its ligaments and sinews, grows as God causes it to grow.   (Colossians 2:18-19)

Is God calling us to come to His mount of transfiguration? Are we ready? We are not to seek spiritual experiences per se. Rather, let us seek Jesus and His glory.

Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord. (2 Cor. 3:17-18)

We are transformed by whom or what we worship. Let our worship be the Lord Jesus Christ and Him only. He is the culmination of all the Law and the Prophets. Let us focus on Him and listen to His words. Let us look into His face and be transformed from glory to glory.

Very soon Jesus will be calling His Bride. We must wait with expectation with our oil lamps full. We want to be full of the Holy Spirit and emptied from the pleasures and distractions of this world. The ultimate transfiguration for us will be when we receive a glorified body in heaven.

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Last Sunday after Epiphany, Year A

carl_heinrich_bloch_the_transfiguration1A Called to the Mountaintop

Have we received a call from God to come up to the mountaintop? If so, we would be in good company.

The LORD said to Moses, “Come up to me on the mountain, and wait there; and I will give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction.” So Moses set out with his assistant Joshua, and Moses went up into the mountain of God.   (Exodus 24:12-13)

God calls us up to His mountain. He is calling everyone to do so. Her calls us each by name. Are we listening? Peter, James, and John were listening. We read in Matthew:

Six days later, Jesus took with him Peter and James and his brother John and led them up a high mountain, by themselves.   (Matthew 17:)

There is a purpose for a mountaintop experience. Moses was called by God to receive His commandments which established the Old Covenant. Peter, James, and John were called by Jesus up to the Mount of Transfiguration to understand the New Covenant.

On the mountain we learn the purposes and plans of God, if we are attentive. In today’s Gospel we read:

Then Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good for us to be here; if you wish, I will make three dwellings here, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” While he was still speaking, suddenly a bright cloud overshadowed them, and from the cloud a voice said, “This is my Son, the Beloved; with him I am well pleased; listen to him!” When the disciples heard this, they fell to the ground and were overcome by fear. But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Get up and do not be afraid.” And when they looked up, they saw no one except Jesus himself alone.  (Matthew 17:4-8)

Peter had become distracted. He was overwhelmed by the experience. He knew the event was important and he wanted to preserve it. Nonetheless, Peter missed the significance of this event, at least initially. Many Christians today are seeking signs and wonders. These were meant for unbelievers. As Christians we must learn to value what is significant to our spiritual growth and what is central to the will of God. After the resurrection Peter wrote:

We did not follow cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we had been eyewitnesses of his majesty. For he received honor and glory from God the Father when that voice was conveyed to him by the Majestic Glory, saying, “This is my Son, my Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.” We ourselves heard this voice come from heaven, while we were with him on the holy mountain.   (2 Peter 1:16-18)

What was the significant message of the Mount of Transfiguration? Mose and Elijah represented the Law of God and the Prophets. Neither the Law nor the Prophets can grant us salvation. Jesus is the fulfillment of the Law and the Prophets. Salvation is only by grace through faith in Him.

There is also a very significant byproduct of a mountain top experience with God. When Moses came down from Mount Sinai his face shone because he had been in the presence of God. For this reason he wore a veil over his face. As we follow Jesus we are not meant to wear a veil. We are called to shine with the glory of God.

And we all, who with unveiled faces contemplate the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his image with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.   (2 Corinthians 3:18)

Jesus has purchased the right for us to come up to the mountain of God. Are we willing to spend some of our time with Him. If so, He will change us more and more into His likeness. On the mountain top we are transformed. (We become who or what we worship.) All this is in preparation for the time we, too, will be transfigured. We will be carried away to the Father’s house for a lasting celebration.

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