Tag Archives: death

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 18C

Track 1: Reshaped in God’s Hands

Jeremiah 18:1-11
Psalm 139:1-5, 12-17
Philemon 1-21
Luke 14:25-33

Today’s Old Testament reading presents us a graphic picture of our creator God:

The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: “Come, go down to the potter’s house, and there I will let you hear my words.” So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel. The vessel he was making of clay was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel, as seemed good to him.

Then the word of the Lord came to me: Can I not do with you, O house of Israel, just as this potter has done? says the Lord. Just like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand, O house of Israel.   (Jeremiah 18:1-6)

God is the potter and we are the clay. That must mean that God is in charge of our lives when we yield to him. But a popular teaching in today’s church is that God will bless whatever we are doing as long as we have the faith that he will. In other words, we may be able to influence and manage God if we have the right formula.

The psalmist wrote in the Old Testament a very New Testament message:

He who sits in the heavens laughs;
    the Lord has them in derision.
Then he will speak to them in his wrath,
    and terrify them in his fury, saying,
“I have set my king on Zion, my holy hill.”

I will tell of the decree of the Lord:
He said to me, “You are my son;
    today I have begotten you.
Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage,
    and the ends of the earth your possession.
You shall break them with a rod of iron,
    and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.”   (Psalm 2:4-9)

What the psalmist is saying that God the Father has turned over his potter’s wheel to his Son. Jesus has the right and authority to mold us as he will. In order to do that he may first have to break some of us and then remold us.

Many people were initially attracted to Jesus and followed him. But did they understand the cost to them of what that meant. In today’s Gospel message Jesus made this shocking statement:

Now large crowds were traveling with Jesus; and he turned and said to them, “Whoever comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters, yes, and even life itself, cannot be my disciple. Whoever does not carry the cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.   (Luke 14:25-33)

Families are important. Jesus loved his family as he loves us all. We remember there was a time, however, when the family of Jesus wanted to stop his ministry and make him come home. From the Gospel of Mark:

Then his mother and his brothers came; and standing outside, they sent to him and called him. A crowd was sitting around him; and they said to him, “Your mother and your brothers and sisters are outside, asking for you.” And he replied, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” And looking at those who sat around him, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! Whoever does the will of God is my brother and sister and mother.”   (Mark 3:31-35)

Members of the true family of God are the ones on the master potter’s wheel. Those who are not on the wheel may call us out. They may attempt to convince us to get off the wheel, leaving us to decide: o we love God more than anything or anyone, including our own family members?

When true Christian discipleship is involved tensions may arise. The temptation may be do whatever is required to keep the peace. But here is what the Prince of Peace has proclaimed:

Do you think that I have come to bring peace to the earth? No, I tell you, but rather division! From now on five in one household will be divided, three against two and two against three; they will be divided:

father against son
    and son against father,
mother against daughter
    and daughter against mother,
mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law
    and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.”   (Luke 12:51-53)

There is only one master potter. Are we ready to go down to the potter’s house along with Jeremiah? God wants to mold us in his image. He is the potter, we are the clay. Or, like some, do we wish to change the image of God to our liking?

 

 

Track 2: Choose Life

Deuteronomy 30:15-20
Psalm 1
Philemon 1-21
Luke 14:25-33

This was the last chance for Moses to speak to the children of Israel. They would soon enter the promise land, but Moses would not be going with them. Nonetheless, Moses had a word from God that they should take with them. It was a vital word that rings down to they day:

Moses said to all Israel the words which the Lord commanded him, “See, I have set before you today life and prosperity, death and adversity. If you obey the commandments of the Lord your God that I am commanding you today, by loving the Lord your God, walking in his ways, and observing his commandments, decrees, and ordinances, then you shall live and become numerous, and the Lord your God will bless you in the land that you are entering to possess. But if your heart turns away and you do not hear, but are led astray to bow down to other gods and serve them, I declare to you today that you shall perish; you shall not live long in the land that you are crossing the Jordan to enter and possess. I call heaven and earth to witness against you today that I have set before you life and death, blessings and curses. Choose life so that you and your descendants may live, loving the Lord your God, obeying him, and holding fast to him; for that means life to you and length of days, so that you may live in the land that the Lord swore to give to your ancestors, to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.”   (Deuteronomy 30:15-20)

The psalmist wrote about the benefits of obeying the word of God:

Happy are they who have not walked in the counsel of the wicked,
nor lingered in the way of sinners,
nor sat in the seats of the scornful!

Their delight is in the law of the Lord,
and they meditate on his law day and night.   (Psalm 1:1-2)

But, as we know, Israel did not always walk in God’s ways, observing his commandments. Because of their disobedience, Israel paid a high price. But that was the Old Covenant. What about the New Covenant? What has Jesus asked us to do? From today’s Gospel reading:

Now large crowds were traveling with Jesus; and he turned and said to them, “Whoever comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters, yes, and even life itself, cannot be my disciple. Whoever does not carry the cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.   (Luke 14:25-27)

Choosing God’s way is not a casual decision. It should be a sobering one. Moses present the choice as a life and death situation. If we do choose God’s way then we must be willing to follow through on our choice. Jesus spoke of a king preparing for war:

What king, going out to wage war against another king, will not sit down first and consider whether he is able with ten thousand to oppose the one who comes against him with twenty thousand? If he cannot, then, while the other is still far away, he sends a delegation and asks for the terms of peace. your possessions.   (Luke 14:31-32)

God makes demands on us. If we are to become disciples of Christ we must understand what those demands might mean. Many so-called “seeker churches” may want to minimize those demands. They may just scare too many church prospects away. We can talk about them later, sometime. No. Jesus is saying those demands must be considered up front. He concludes his parable of the king preparing for war this way:

So therefore, none of you can become my disciple if you do not give up all.   (Luke 14:33)

Let us consider what God gave up. He gave up his only eternal Son:

 He who did not withhold his own Son, but gave him up for all of us, will he not with him also give us everything else?

God wants to give us everything. We must be willing to open our hearts and hands to him. He is saying to us: Choose life.

For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.   (John 3:16)

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Resurrection Sunday: Principal Service, Year C

The Resurrection of the Dead

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

What a discovery it must have been for the women whom God had chosen to be the first witnesses of the resurrection. From the Gospel of Luke we read:

On the first day of the week, at early dawn, the women who had come with Jesus from Galilee came to the tomb, taking the spices that they had prepared. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in, they did not find the body. While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men in dazzling clothes stood beside them. The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen. Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.”   (Luke 24:4-7)

The women  were asked a very important question by the angels who were at the tomb: “Why do you look for the living among the dead?” Jesus had defeated death. Death could not contain him. They were looking in the place where they expected to see Jesus. But they were looking in the wrong place. He was no longer there.

From Isaiah we read:

And he will destroy on this mountain
    the shroud that is cast over all peoples,
    the sheet that is spread over all nations;
    he will swallow up death forever.   (Isaiah 25:7-8)

A shroud had been cast over all people. This a covering that weighs us down. We can imagine an infinite life. It is something most people would want. But we cannot achieve it on our own. We eventually die.

Some are saying that our consciousness could morph into a computer chip somehow. Is there a way to become immortal? Humankind keeps search. What is standing in our way?

God had told Adam and Eve that they could eat fruit from any tree in Garden of Eden except one tree. If they ate of that tree they would die. We remember how Satan tricked Eve:

But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”   (Genesis 3:4-5)

Satan lied when he said she would not die, He enticed her to sin and sin is what caused death. Science looks for a wisdom around death. Satan promised we would have the wisdom of God. But our so-called wisdom falls short. We cannot defeat death.

Does science offer us hope of immortality? Can we discover the miracle cure that extends our lives indefinitely? Many people are looking in the wrong place. Such wishful thinking is really a denial of the consequences of sin. No one can solve the problem of death who does not first solve the problem of sin. Jesus has solved them both.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have died. For since death came through a human being, the resurrection of the dead has also come through a human being; for as all die in Adam, so all will be made alive in Christ. But each in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then at his coming those who belong to Christ. Then comes the end, when he hands over the kingdom to God the Father, after he has destroyed every ruler and every authority and power. For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. The last enemy to be destroyed is death.   (1 Corinthians 15:19-26)

Only Jesus can destroy death. He came into the world that death and the fear of death would be eradicated, along with the cause of death, which is our sin.

Today, are we looking for the living among the dead? This world is fleeting. It has no answers concerning death. Where are we looking for life? Are we looking to the one who promises us life, and life more abundantly?

Apostle Peter, by revelation from God, gained an understanding of the resurrection is for everyone. When God revealed to him that even Gentiles could be saved, he proclaimed:

They put Jesus to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”   (Acts 10:39-43)

The resurrection of Jesus Christ is the answer to death. The grave could not hold Jesus, nor can it hold us who believe in his resurrection.

The Lord has risen indeed! We have been chosen by God to make the same discovery of the women at the tomb. His tomb is empty. The only tomb left is a world without Jesus.

Are we still at the tomb or have we discovered that Jesus has risen from the dead? If we have, let us go and tell someone. Jesus has defeated sin, hell, and the grave. We are set free sin and death.

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

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April 21, 2019 · 12:03 am

Resurrection Sunday: Easter Early Service

Freedom from Fear and Death

One of the following readings from the Old Testament:

Genesis 1:1-2:4a [The Story of Creation] 
Genesis 7:1-5, 11-18, 8:6-18, 9:8-13 [The Flood] 
Genesis 22:1-18 [Abraham’s sacrifice of Isaac] 
Exodus 14:10-31; 15:20-21 [Israel’s deliverance at the Red Sea] 
Isaiah 55:1-11 [Salvation offered freely to all] 
Baruch 3:9-15, 3:32-4:4 or Proverbs 8:1-8, 19-21; 9:4b-6 [Learn wisdom and live]
Ezekiel 36:24-28 [A new heart and a new spirit]
Ezekiel 37:1-14 [The valley of dry bones] 
Zephaniah 3:14-20 [The gathering of God’s people] 

Romans 6:3-11 
Matthew 28:1-10 
Psalm 114

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

Today we celebrate the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. The good news of the Gospel is that his resurrection is also our resurrection. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his.   (Romans 6:3-11)

Jesus died for us so that we will no longer be slaves to sin and death. Again, Paul wrote:

We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin. For whoever has died is freed from sin. But if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.   (Romans 6:3-11)

Slavery to sin and death engenders fear. Fear had taken over the disciples of Jesus after his crucifixion, In their minds all had been lost. The miracle worker was with them no more. It took his resurrection appearance to change their fear and sorrow into joy.

The women had gone to Jesus’s tomb on the first day of the week. They were the first to see the resurrected Lord. We read in Matthew:

Suddenly Jesus met them and said, “Greetings!” And they came to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”   (Matthew 28:9-10)

We live in a fearful world today. But as Christians, we do not have to live in fear. The resurrection changes everything. If we are still living in fear we need is a resurrection appearance of Jesus.We may or many not see him in his physical person now, but we can see him through the eyes of faith, provided that we have allowed his Spirit enter into our hearts. If we are still clinging to the old self which refuses to die then we will probably not encounter him. It is time to turn away from our flesh. It does not satisfy us.

In fact, our flesh enslaves us through fear. We cannot find the Lord with our mind. It is much too limited. God wants us to have the mind of Christ.

Isaiah wrote:

Seek the Lord while he may be found,
    call upon him while he is near;
let the wicked forsake their way,
    and the unrighteous their thoughts;
let them return to the Lord, that he may have mercy on them,
    and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.
For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
    nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord.
For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
    so are my ways higher than your ways
    and my thoughts than your thoughts.  (Isaiah 55:6-9)

The flesh cannot thrive in the joy of the resurrection. God will give us a revelation of the resurrection when we seek him alone. When he does all fear is dispelled.

Jesus came to earth and shared our flesh and blood. He was like us in every way but did not sin. By his death he destroyed sin and death. From Hebrews we read:

Since, therefore, the children share flesh and blood, he himself likewise shared the same things, so that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil, and free those who all their lives were held in slavery by the fear of death.   (Hebrews 2:14-15)

Jesus did not die for us to remain as we are. He has gifts for those who believe. The psalmist wrote:

You ascended the high mount,
    leading captives in your train
    and receiving gifts from people,
even from those who rebel against the Lord God’s abiding there.
Blessed be the Lord,
    who daily bears us up;
    God is our salvation.

Today, Jesus is saying to us: “Do not be afraid. I have risen.” Let us listen for his voice. We will say to us as he said to the women: “Go and tell others that you have seen me.”

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

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