Tag Archives: cleansing

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 19C

 

Track 1: A Hot Wind out of the Desert

Jeremiah 4:11-12, 22-28
Psalm 14
1 Timothy 1:12-17
Luke 15:1-10

Today, let us look at two types of winds that come from God. The first one we will look at is covered in today’s reading from Jeremiah:

At that time it will be said to this people and to Jerusalem: A hot wind comes from me out of the bare heights in the desert toward my poor people, not to winnow or cleanse– a wind too strong for that. Now it is I who speak in judgment against them.

“For my people are foolish,
they do not know me;

they are stupid children,
they have no understanding.

They are skilled in doing evil,
but do not know how to do good.”   (Jeremiah 4:11-12, 22)

This wind is not a cleansing wind. It is a wind that cannot be ignored. In fact, it brings us to our knees. Israel was not listening to God. What was prophesicd by Jeremiah came to pass:

For thus says the Lord: The whole land shall be a desolation; yet I will not make a full end. (Jeremiah 4:27)

God did not stop with this desert wind.  He has provided a cleansing wind and a winnowing wind. We remember in the Gospel of John that Jesus attempted to explain this wind to Nicodemus:

“Very truly, I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit. What is born of the flesh is flesh, and what is born of the Spirit is spirit. Do not be astonished that I said to you, ‘You must be born from above.’ The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”   (John 3:5-8)

Which wind of God is blowing in our lives today? Are we allowing the Holy Spirt of God to reshape us and refresh us? If not, we may be experiencing a strong hot wind that tells us that something is wrong. This wind does not cleanse us but it can move us to seek out the wind that does.

The Apostle Paul was once persecuting the body of Christ. God had to literally knock him off his horse and blind hm. Paul wrote:

I am grateful to Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, because he judged me faithful and appointed me to his service, even though I was formerly a blasphemer, a persecutor, and a man of violence. But I received mercy because I had acted ignorantly in unbelief, and the grace of our Lord overflowed for me with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. The saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners– of whom I am the foremost.   (1 Timothy 1:12-15)

All of us have sinned and come short of the glory of God. That does not stop God for seeking us out. In today’s Gospel reading Jesus tells the parable of the lost coin:

“What woman having ten silver coins, if she loses one of them, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it? When she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors, saying, `Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.’ Just so, I tell you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”   (Luke 15:8-10)

The parable of the Lost Coin tells us how much God wants to rescue us. He wants to cleanse us. He wants to restore us. He wants to refresh us. God the Father’s heart longs for our soul to return to hm. He will use any means possible to reach us. Oftentimes that means we may experience that hot dry wind from out of the desert. This wind is a call to repentance.

Which wind of God is blowing in our lives today? Jesus breathed on his disciples and said: Receive the Holy Spirit (John 20:22). Are we ready for Jesus to breathe on us today, perhaps for the first time? Or perhaps to refresh us, restore our health, or equip us for further ministry in his name?

 

 

Track 2: The Lost Coin

Exodus 32:7-14
Psalm 51:1-11
1 Timothy 1:12-17
Luke 15:1-10

Jesus told many parables. They were able to capture the attention of the listener. This one always grabbed me:

“What woman having ten silver coins, if she loses one of them, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it? When she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors, saying, `Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.’ Just so, I tell you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”   (Luke 15:8-10)

The scribes and Pharisees, the religious authorities of Israel, did not understand the ministry of Jesus. Nor did they want to understand it. Perhaps one of the best illustrations of this is when Jesus went to visit the tax collector Zacchaeus. From the Gospel of Luke:

All who saw it began to grumble and said, “He has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner.” Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, “Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much.” Then Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because he too is a son of Abraham. For the Son of Man came to seek out and to save the lost.”   (Luke 19:7-10)

Jesus came to seek and to save. He is still very much in that ministry. His ministry to Zacchaeus illustrates one very key factor, however. Repentance is required on the part of those who were lost. The Great King David was lost. He had committed adultery and later, murder, to cover up his sin from the eyes of his subjects. God sees everything, however. When David was confronted by Nathan the prophet, David repented from his heart before God. His repentance is found in his beautiful Psalm 51:

Have mercy on me, O God, according to your loving-kindness;
in your great compassion blot out my offenses.

Wash me through and through from my wickedness
and cleanse me from my sin.

For I know my transgressions,
and my sin is ever before me.

Against you only have I sinned
and done what is evil in your sight.  (Psalm 51:1-4)

The Apostle Paul was at one time lost. He had been persecuting the Early Church. He had zeal for the Mosaic Law. What he failed to understand was that Jesus came to fulfill that law. Paul writes:

I am grateful to Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, because he judged me faithful and appointed me to his service, even though I was formerly a blasphemer, a persecutor, and a man of violence. But I received mercy because I had acted ignorantly in unbelief, and the grace of our Lord overflowed for me with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. The saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners– of whom I am the foremost.   (1 Timothy 1:12-15)

Are we a lost coin today? If we have sinned against God he will rescue us. He will not only forgive us but he will also cleanse us restore us. Nevertheless,  our repentance must be from our heart. David’s confession in Psalm 51 goes on to say:

For behold, you look for truth deep within me,
and will make me understand wisdom secretly.

Purge me from my sin, and I shall be pure;
wash me, and I shall be clean indeed.

Make me hear of joy and gladness,
that the body you have broken may rejoice.

Hide your face from my sins
and blot out all my iniquities.

Create in me a clean heart, O God,
and renew a right spirit within me.  (Psalm 51:7-11)

Lost coins can become dirty and dull. The good news is that God can clean them and shine them up. The blood of his Son Jesus washes away all of our sins. All we need to do is to turn to Jesus with all our hearts. He has already turned to us. Amen.

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