Tag Archives: Christ crucified

Fifth Sunday of Easter

Evangelism

To be sure, some Christians are called and gifted to serve as an evangelist. But every Christian has a part in the ministry of evangelism. Some might say that they just do not know how to do it. That is where the Holy Spirit comes in. He is the greatest evangelist. Perhaps we should rely on him do the work of evangelism through us.

Today’s appointed scripture gives us an excellent case study on evangelism. Beginning with the Book of Acts:

An angel of the Lord said to Philip, “Get up and go toward the south to the road that goes down from Jerusalem to Gaza.” (This is a wilderness road.) So he got up and went. Now there was an Ethiopian eunuch, a court official of the Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, in charge of her entire treasury. He had come to Jerusalem to worship and was returning home; seated in his chariot, he was reading the prophet Isaiah. Then the Spirit said to Philip, “Go over to this chariot and join it.” So Philip ran up to it and heard him reading the prophet Isaiah. He asked, “Do you understand what you are reading?” He replied, “How can I, unless someone guides me?” And he invited Philip to get in and sit beside him.   (Acts 8:26-31)

To do evangelism we need to be put in position to do so. We need to be led by the Spirit of where He wants us to do evangelism. Next, we need to do evangelism in context. Evangelism by the numbers, following a set of rules, tends to be unproductive in most cases . If is is forced it can turn people off.

Philip did not have a preconceived plan. He simply responded to the leading of the Spirit. The Holy Spirit had already prepared the heart of the Ethiopian eunuch. Again, from Acts:

Now the passage of the scripture that he was reading was this:

“Like a sheep he was led to the slaughter,
and like a lamb silent before its shearer,
so he does not open his mouth.

In his humiliation justice was denied him.
Who can describe his generation?
For his life is taken away from the earth.”

The eunuch asked Philip, “About whom, may I ask you, does the prophet say this, about himself or about someone else?” Then Philip began to speak, and starting with this scripture, he proclaimed to him the good news about Jesus.   (Acts 8:32-34)

The message of the cross is the core of evangelism. The Apostle Paul wrote:

When I came to you, brothers and sisters, I did not come proclaiming the mystery of God to you in lofty words or wisdom. For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ, and him crucified.   (1 Corinthians 2:1-2)

In his First Epistle, the Apostle John wrote:

God’s love was revealed among us in this way: God sent his only Son into the world so that we might live through him. In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the atoning sacrifice for our sins.   (1 John 4:9-10)

Evangelism is not about asking someone to attend a church or a Bible study, That is all well and good. It is not getting someone to say the sinners prayer, especially if they do not understand the depth and breadth of their sin, Rather, evangelism is about converting souls. Only the Holy Spirit can do that. But souls are not ready until they are aware of the magnitude of their sin and the price God has paid to cleanse them of all unrighteousness. Only the message of the cross will bring about this awareness.

Evangelism does not stop at the cross, however. It is also an invitation of come into union with the Lord Jesus Christ. Reading from today’s Gospel of John:

Jesus said to his disciples, ”I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinegrower. He removes every branch in me that bears no fruit. Every branch that bears fruit he prunes to make it bear more fruit. You have already been cleansed by the word that I have spoken to you. Abide in me as I abide in you. Just as the branch cannot bear fruit by itself unless it abides in the vine, neither can you unless you abide in me. I am the vine, you are the branches. Those who abide in me and I in them bear much fruit, because apart from me you can do nothing.    (John 15:1-5)

The Christian faith asked for a commitment on our part. We are asked to live a new life of love and holiness. We cannot do this on our own. Jesus  cleanses us from our sins. He also calls requites  us to forsake sin.

As Christians, we are asked to produce fruit of the Holy Spirit. Part of that fruit is leading others to Christ by our words and example.

Are we excited about the kingdom of God? Are we excited about the good news of Christ that we want to tell others? Becoming of being a disciple of Christ is bearing fruit. Jesus makes this promise to all who commit their lives to him:

If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask for whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. My Father is glorified by this, that you bear much fruit and become my disciples.”   (John 15:7-8)

The days of superficiality are over. The Ethiopian eunuch was excited about the good news of Christ. He could not wait to be baptized. Reading from Acts:

As they were going along the road, they came to some water; and the eunuch said, “Look, here is water! What is to prevent me from being baptized?” He commanded the chariot to stop, and both of them, Philip and the eunuch, went down into the water, and Philip[c] baptized him. When they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord snatched Philip away; the eunuch saw him no more, and went on his way rejoicing.   (Acts 8:36-39)

Today, let us dwell on the awareness of what Jesus has done for us and the price he has paid. What are we willing to give to him?

Help us, dear Lord, to grow in grace, fully committed to you, so that we may bring forth lasting fruit in your name.  Amen.

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Third Sunday of Easter

By Faith in His Name

Peter and John had performed a great miracle. At the gate of the Temple they healed a man who was lame from birth. Many people observed what they did, though it was not what they did. Reading from Acts:

Peter addressed the people, “You Israelites, why do you wonder at this, or why do you stare at us, as though by our own power or piety we had made him walk? The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, the God of our ancestors has glorified his servant Jesus, whom you handed over and rejected in the presence of Pilate, though he had decided to release him. But you rejected the Holy and Righteous One and asked to have a murderer given to you, and you killed the Author of life, whom God raised from the dead. To this we are witnesses. And by faith in his name, his name itself has made this man strong, whom you see and know; and the faith that is through Jesus has given him this perfect health in the presence of all of you.   (Acts 3:12-16)

.The risen Lord was real to Peter and John. They knew he was still with them, even though he had ascended to the Father. This was not the case at first. Jesus had to reprimand them for their unbelief. Reading from Luke:

Jesus himself stood among the disciples and said to them, “Peace be with you.” They were startled and terrified, and thought that they were seeing a ghost. He said to them, “Why are you frightened, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? Look at my hands and my feet; see that it is I myself. Touch me and see; for a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have.” And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. While in their joy they were disbelieving and still wondering, he said to them, “Have you anything here to eat?” They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate in their presence.   (Luke 24:36-43)

The disciples saw Jesus first as a ghost and were frightened. Jesus had to prove to them that he had a body and was truly alive. He then opened their minds to understand what his death and resurrection meant:

Then he said to them, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you—that everything written about me in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms must be fulfilled.” Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures, and he said to them, “Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things.   ()

The disciples were taught directly by Jesus for three years but they did not fully grasp what his ministry was about. Now they understood who he was and is. Jesus had become more real to them than ever before. He was the same person they knew before, but now he was also the Lord of all. His name was above every name. His purpose was instilled in them. They learned the power and authority that they had in his name. When they did they could carry on his work on the earth with great confidence that they were standing in for him until he returned in glory.

:Peter could now boldly preach the Gospel of Christ: Again, reading from Acts:

“And now, friends, I know that you acted in ignorance, as did also your rulers. In this way God fulfilled what he had foretold through all the prophets, that his Messiah would suffer. Repent therefore, and turn to God so that your sins may be wiped out.”   ()

Jesus became real in the disciples, now apostles. They remembered that Jesus promised:

I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.   (John 14:13)

Of course, there will always be opposition from the enemy. The bolder we become, the more he will try to stop us. The Jewish authorities forbid that the apostles speak about the name of Jesus anymore. Under threat of persecution, the apostles had a prayer meeting. They prayed, in part:

And now, Lord, look at their threats, and grant to your servants[k] to speak your word with all boldness, while you stretch out your hand to heal, and signs and wonders are performed through the name of your holy servant[l] Jesus.” When they had prayed, the place in which they were gathered together was shaken; and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke the word of God with boldness.   (Acts 3:29-31)

The age of the apostles is not over.. We, too, have been given power and authority in the name of Jesus. We were not there to see Jesus resurrected from the dead. We did not hear his great commission to preach the Gospel to all the world. But we have the testimony of men and women who gave their all because Jesus was so real to them. Is the risen Lord real to us? Has he become our cornerstone? Is he our foundation? Is he the head of our church. If so, leet us step out in boldness. The risen Lord is with us. He needs us to carry on the ministry in his name.

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