Tag Archives: calling of God

Saint Simon and Saint Jude

st simon and st jude2Called to Preach the Gospel

In today’s Old Testament reading Moses declares:

Give ear, O heavens, and I will speak; let the earth hear the words of my mouth. May my teaching drop like the rain, my speech condense like the dew; like gentle rain on grass, like showers on new growth. For I will proclaim the name of the LORD; ascribe greatness to our God! The Rock, his work is perfect, and all his ways are just. A faithful God, without deceit, just and upright is he.   (Deuteronomy 32:1-4)

Moses knew that he was blessed by the Spirit of God. Thus, he realized that he had an obligation and responsibility to teach his word.

Saint Simon and Saint Jude were blessed by God. They were called by Jesus directly to preach and teach the Gospel. Some ancient Christian writers say that Simon and Jude went together as missionaries to Persia, and were martyred there. If this is true, it explains why they are usually put together. Little else is known of their ministry. Nevertheless, they were faithful to their calling. After all, the calling of God is not to speak about who we are but about what God has done for us in Christ.

Before He was crucified Jesus told His disciples that they would receive the gift of the Holy Spirit so that they would be able to on His behalf because that is what the Holy Spirit does. Jesus said:

“When the Advocate comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who comes from the Father, he will testify on my behalf. You also are to testify because you have been with me from the beginning.”    (John 15:27)

Have we received the Holy Spirit? Have we also been called by to testify to the truth of the Gospel? The Apostle Paul wrote that Jesus came to reconcile the world unto Himself and that our testimony is important in that process:

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ and gave us the ministry of reconciliation: that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them. And he has committed to us the message of reconciliation.   (2 Corinthians 5:17-19)

The new creation that God has brought about in Christ brings reconciliation between all people. Paul writes:

Now in Christ Jesus you Gentiles, who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. For he is our peace; in his flesh he has made both groups into one and has broken down the dividing wall, that is, the hostility between us. He has abolished the law with its commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new humanity in place of the two, thus making peace, and might reconcile both groups to God in one body through the cross, thus putting to death that hostility through it. So he came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near; for through him both of us have access in one Spirit to the Father.   (Ephesians 2:13-18)

People are so divided today. Our responsibility is to bring unity in Christ because we have been given this “message of reconciliation.” We cannot do this on our own, but we have been given the Holy Spirit to guide us and direct us in this ministry. Let us follow the faithful example of men like Simon and Jude.

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Third Sunday after the Epiphany, Year B

Follow Me

There are times when the call of God may interrupt our lives. This was true for Simon and his brother Andrew. From today’s Gospel we read:

As Jesus passed along the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, “Follow me and I will make you fish for people.” And immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John, who were in their boat mending the nets. Immediately he called them; and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men, and followed him. (Mark 1:16-20)

These fishermen left their nets and their livelihood to follow a man whose purpose and direction was unknown to them. Nevertheless, they were able to put their trust in him.

The Prophet Jonah was called by God to go to the city of Nineveh. In this case, Johan understood what God was asking but he did not like it. As we remember, he ran in the other direction from Nineveh. Nineveh was a notorious city. It was hated by the Jews for good reason. How could God be asking him to preach revival to this city Jonah must have thought.

When God calls us he does not easily give up. From Jonah we read:

The word of the Lord came to Jonah a second time, saying, “Get up, go to Nineveh, that great city, and proclaim to it the message that I tell you.” So Jonah set out and went to Nineveh, according to the word of the Lord. Now Nineveh was an exceedingly large city, a three days’ walk across. Jonah began to go into the city, going a day’s walk. And he cried out, “Forty days more, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!” And the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast, and everyone, great and small, put on sackcloth.   (Jonah 3:1-5)

God may give us impossible assignments. If the calling is from God then it is guaranteed to be impossible without his help. What is amazing about many biblical examples of the calling of God led to the fulfillment of impossible tasks. Nonetheless, the obedience of those who were called was absolutely essential.

What keeps us from obeying the call of God? We remember the rich young man who wanted to follow Jesus but had too many possessions to give up. God has blessed our nation. Worldly possessions may just be a hindrance to us in answering God’s call.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

I mean, brothers and sisters, the appointed time has grown short; from now on, let even those who have wives be as though they had none, and those who mourn as though they were not mourning, and those who rejoice as though they were not rejoicing, and those who buy as though they had no possessions, and those who deal with the world as though they had no dealings with it. For the present form of this world is passing away.   (1 Corinthians 7:29-31)

Paul was saying: ignore the circumstances in which you may find yourself. This world is passing away anyway. Follow God.

Our obedience to God can help to bring great changes in the lives of others. When God calls us he calls us for a reason. His reason is well beyond ourselves. Do we value his agenda more than our own? Do we love others the way he loves us?

In the case of Noah, a great city was saved:

When God saw what they did, how they turned from their evil ways, God changed his mind about the calamity that he had said he would bring upon them; and he did not do it.   (Jonah 3:10)

Our calling may not be as significant as Noah’s. We may not think that we are great prophets or preachers, but who are we to say? Some of the apostles were simple fishermen. The important thing is that they were obedient to their calling and their calling changed the whole world.

The Season of the Epiphany is a time to listen to God. What is he asking us to do? If it were not important he would not be asking us.

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Second Sunday after the Epiphany, Year B

baby_in_the_womb_by_azrael1984The Calling of God

During the Season of the Epiphany we reflect upon those times in which God has revealed himself to humankind, and to each one of us personally. He has called each of us unto himself. Do we remember those times?

Today we celebrate the calling of Samuel and that of Nathanael, an Apostle of Jesus Christ. Samuel was only a small boy when he heard God’s call. He did not understand, at first, that it was God who was talking to him. We read from 1 Samuel:

At that time Eli, whose eyesight had begun to grow dim so that he could not see, was lying down in his room; the lamp of God had not yet gone out, and Samuel was lying down in the temple of the Lord, where the ark of God was. Then the Lord called, “Samuel! Samuel!” and he said, “Here I am!” and ran to Eli, and said, “Here I am, for you called me.” But he said, “I did not call; lie down again.” So he went and lay down. The Lord called again, “Samuel!” Samuel got up and went to Eli, and said, “Here I am, for you called me.” But he said, “I did not call, my son; lie down again.” Now Samuel did not yet know the Lord, and the word of the Lord had not yet been revealed to him. The Lord called Samuel again, a third time. And he got up and went to Eli, and said, “Here I am, for you called me.” Then Eli perceived that the Lord was calling the boy. Therefore Eli said to Samuel, “Go, lie down; and if he calls you, you shall say, ‘Speak, Lord, for your servant is listening.’” So Samuel went and lay down in his place.   (1 Samuel 3:2-9)

A small boy become a great prophet. God used him to restore the priesthood of Israel. We remember that the sons of Eli had desecrated the temple to the point that the very presence and power of God was greatly diminished.

Nathanael was called by Jesus to be one of his twelve disciples. Nathanael had no deceit, as Jesus declared, yet Nathanael was skeptical about the Messiah coming out of Nazareth. His skepticism quickly turned to faith, however. From John’s Gospel we read:

Jesus decided to go to Galilee. He found Philip and said to him, “Follow me.” Now Philip was from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter. Philip found Nathanael and said to him, “We have found him about whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus son of Joseph from Nazareth.” Nathanael said to him, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip said to him, “Come and see.” When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.”   (John 1:43-51)

God takes the ordinary and turns them into extraordinary men and women of God. Is that true for us? Surely he had called each one of us. We have been given specific ministries in his kingdom that only we can accomplish, we his help and direction.

Have we missed our call? Have we heard from God. Our very souls have heard his call, even before we were born. From Psalm 139 we read:

For you yourself created my inmost parts;
you knit me together in my mother’s womb.

I will thank you because I am marvelously made;
your works are wonderful, and I know it well.

My body was not hidden from you,
while I was being made in secret
and woven in the depths of the earth.

Your eyes beheld my limbs, yet unfinished in the womb;
all of them were written in your book;
they were fashioned day by day,
when as yet there was none of them.   (Psalm 139:12-15)

How many great men and women of God have been lost through abortion? His plans for us began in our mother’s womb.

God has surely called each one of us. And he continually extends that call throughout our lives. But we must listen attentively to his voice. Samuel and Nathanael had to make some adjustments in their understanding of God’s call. They had to learn to grow closer to God each day.

We can do the same, if we are open to him. If we have our hearts set on him. Samuel and Nathanael move from skepticism to faith. How are we doing? It is not to late to make adjustments in our lives in order to more closely follow our Lord. Samuel and Nathanael made adjustments because they were able to devote themselves to God from their hearts.

This year is an opportunity for us to grow in our understanding of God. Will we follow our Lord more closely and listen to his instructions. God has truly called us to be his faithful servants. He needs us to help advance his kingdom on this earth, and in the age to come. What a great calling each one of us has. Are we ready for our Epiphany with the Lord?

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