Tag Archives: calling of God

Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 16C

Track 1: Before I Formed You I Knew You

Jeremiah 1:4-10
Psalm 71:1-6
Hebrews 12:18-29
Luke 13:10-17

Children are born with a purpose and a calling from God. That was true of Jeremiah:

The word of the Lord came to me saying,

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you,
and before you were born I consecrated you;
I appointed you a prophet to the nations.”   (Jeremiah 1:4-5)

It is difficult for many of us to understand who God is calling us to be. When we begin to comprehend what God is asking of us, we often protest. Jeremiah did:

Then I said, “Ah, Lord God! Truly I do not know how to speak, for I am only a boy.” But the Lord said to me,

“Do not say, ‘I am only a boy’;
for you shall go to all to whom I send you,
and you shall speak whatever I command you,
Do not be afraid of them,
for I am with you to deliver you,

says the Lord.”   (Jeremiah 1:6-8)

The assignment which God give us may seem well beyond our capabilities. What we need to understand is that we are not alone. God is with us.

The psalmist wrote:

For you are my hope, O Lord God,
my confidence since I was young.

I have been sustained by you ever since I was born;
from my mother’s womb you have been my strength;
my praise shall be always of you.   (Psalm 71:5-6)

This is the beauty and mystery of our calling. It is an opportunity to know God and have an intimate relationship with our creator and redeemer. This is not what the world teaches. This is not what Satan wants. In fact, Satan wants to abort as many children as possible. Children with a calling from God are dangerous to him.

God has a plan for our lives. Our lives are very much a part of his overall plan for humanity. He has called us in order to reshape us, the deliver us, and heal us. He has called us into his kingdom which is unshakable. The world is passing as we know it is passing away.

From today’s Epistle reading:

At that time his voice shook the earth; but now he has promised, “Yet once more I will shake not only the earth but also the heaven.” This phrase, “Yet once more,” indicates the removal of what is shaken– that is, created things– so that what cannot be shaken may remain. Therefore, since we are receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us give thanks, by which we offer to God an acceptable worship with reverence and awe; for indeed our God is a consuming fire.   (Hebrews 12:26-29)

Satan wants us crippled and bound to his lies. God wants to set us free. He sets us free so that we may rejoice and help set others free. In today’s Gospel we read:

Now Jesus was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.” When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.   (Luke 13:10-13)

Healing and deliverance are often controversial, however. The “authorities” often object to it. They did concerning the ministry of Jesus:

But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.” But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”   (Luke 13:14-16)

Who are these authorities? They were not appointed by God. We are his authorities when we answer his call.

Will we answer his call today? Will we enter into his unshakable kingdom? Will we celebrate our freedom and joy for all to see? None of us are too small or too insignificant. We are all destined for his glory. We all have a ministry and a calling. The crippled calling may have only been to glorify God. That could be the greatest calling of us all.

 

 

Track 2: By His Stripes We Are Healed

Isaiah 58:9b-14
Psalm 103:1-8
Hebrews 12:18-29
Luke 13:10-17

Healing is very much a part of the ministry of Jesus. Yet it is still controversial, even to this day. His healing ministry often got him into trouble with the authorities. From today’s Gospel reading:

Now Jesus was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.” When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.   (Luke 13:10-17)

You would have thought that everyone there should have celebrated this woman’s healing. Not so:

But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.” But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”  (Luke 13:14-16)

The healing ministry is very much a part of the new covenant which Jesus established for us by his sacrificial death on a cruel cross. He spilt his blood on our behalf  so that we might be set free from the power of sin and death. Today’s reading from Hebrews speaks of this new covenant:

You have not come to something that can be touched, a blazing fire, and But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable angels in festal gathering, and to the assembly of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven, and to God the judge of all, and to the spirits of the righteous made perfect, and to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood that speaks a better word than the blood of Abel.   (Hebrews 12:22-24)

There is power in the blood of Jesus.

The psalmist wrote:

Bless the Lord, O my soul,
and all that is within me, bless his holy Name.

Bless the Lord, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

He forgives all your sins
and heals all your infirmities;

He redeems your life from the grave
and crowns you with mercy and loving-kindness;

He satisfies you with good things,
and your youth is renewed like an eagle’s.   (Psalm 103:1-5)

Notice the forgiveness of sins becomes before healing. We must acknowledge our sins. Jesus bore them on the cross. He also bore our infirmities. From Isaiah:

Surely He has borne our griefs
And carried our sorrows;
Yet we esteemed Him stricken,
Smitten by God, and afflicted.
But He was wounded for our transgressions,
He was bruised for our iniquities;
The chastisement for our peace was upon Him,
And by His stripes we are healed.   (Isaiah 53:4-5)

The crippled woman whom Jesus healed immediately began praising God. She was bound by Satan but Jesus set her free. Are we still bound by his lies and deception? Or are we ready to affirm, participate in, and celebrate the healing ministry of our Lord?

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year C

Third Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 8C

Track 1: The God of Elijah

2 Kings 2:1-2, 6-14
Psalm 77:1-2, 11-20
Galatians 5:1,13-25
Luke 9:51-62

We continue with the story of Elijah. God had instructed Elijah to anoint Elisha to take his place. It was time for the great prophet to be translated to heaven. We read in 2 Kings:

When they had crossed, Elijah said to Elisha, “Tell me what I may do for you, before I am taken from you.” Elisha said, “Please let me inherit a double share of your spirit.” He responded, “You have asked a hard thing; yet, if you see me as I am being taken from you, it will be granted you; if not, it will not.” As they continued walking and talking, a chariot of fire and horses of fire separated the two of them, and Elijah ascended in a whirlwind into heaven. Elisha kept watching and crying out, “Father, father! The chariots of Israel and its horsemen!” But when he could no longer see him, he grasped his own clothes and tore them in two pieces.

He picked up the mantle of Elijah that had fallen from him, and went back and stood on the bank of the Jordan. He took the mantle of Elijah that had fallen from him, and struck the water, saying, “Where is the Lord, the God of Elijah?” When he had struck the water, the water was parted to the one side and to the other, and Elisha went over.   (2 Kings 2:9-14)

Elisha was very ambitious. He wanted a double portion of the anointing which Elijah had. Nonetheless, something was missing in Elisha’s understanding of God.

Elisha call out to as the God, addressing him as the God of Elijah. God should not be defined by one man’s relationship with him. He is not just the God of one man or woman. In the Old Testament he was referred to as “the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.” This changed, however, when God called Moses to lead his people out of Egypt:

So come, I will send you to Pharaoh to bring my people, the Israelites, out of Egypt.” But Moses said to God, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh, and bring the Israelites out of Egypt?” He said, “I will be with you; and this shall be the sign for you that it is I who sent you: when you have brought the people out of Egypt, you shall worship God on this mountain.”

But Moses said to God, “If I come to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” God said to Moses, “I am who I am.” He said further, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘I am has sent me to you.’” God also said to Moses, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you’:

This is my name forever,
and this my title for all generations.   (Exodus 3:10-15)

God was telling Moses that he must understood in a much broader context. If we know God only through his relationship with another person then we are missing the very nature of God. God transcends any human definition of himself.

The psalmist reflected upon God:

In the day of my trouble I sought the Lord;
my hands were stretched out by night and did not tire;
I refused to be comforted.

I will remember the works of the Lord,
and call to mind your wonders of old time.

I will meditate on all your acts
and ponder your mighty deeds.

Your way, O God, is holy;
who is so great a god as our God?

You are the God who works wonders
and have declared your power among the peoples.

By your strength you have redeemed your people,
the children of Jacob and Joseph.   (Psalm 77:2, 11-15)

To know God is to know his works. He is not just the God of our spiritual mentor. He is creator God of love for all of us to experience and know, if that is our desire. We need to expand our thinking. We need to meditate on the mighty acts of God down trough the ages.

I think that we can safely assume that the Prophet Elisha gsinrf a deeper underrating of God during his prophetic ministry. Though he had a double portion of Elijah’s anointing, he would have been greatly handicapped in faithfully serving God without his teaching, healing, and direction.

How about us today? Are we seeking impressive spiritual power? For what purpose? Do we know who God is? We cannot know God the Father without knowing God the Son. The Pharisees were confused about who Jesus was. They were not prepared for his answer. Jesus said:

Your ancestor Abraham rejoiced that he would see my day; he saw it and was glad.” Then the Jews said to him, “You are not yet fifty years old, and have you seen Abraham?” Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, before Abraham was, I am.”   (John 8:56-58)

We are called by the great I AM. That is who we serve. Our primary task is to walk with him on a daily basis so that we might know God and his ways. The psalmist wrote:

Teach me, O Lord, the way of Your statutes,
And I shall observe it to the end.
Give me understanding, that I may observe Your law
And keep it with all my heart.
Make me walk in the path of Your commandments,
For I delight in it.
Incline my heart to Your testimonies
And not to dishonest gain.
Turn away my eyes from looking at vanity,
And revive me in Your ways.
Establish Your word to Your servant,
As that which produces reverence for You.   (Psalm 119:33-38)

 

 

Track: Fit for the Kingdom of God

1 Kings 19:15-16,19-21
Psalm 16
Galatians 5:1,13-25
Luke 9:51-62

Jesus was on his way to Jerusalem for one final time. Along the way several people said they wanted to join him, not knowing where he was going or what joining him really meant. Reading from today’s Gospel:

As they were going along the road, someone said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” To another he said, “Follow me.” But he said, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.” But Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead; but as for you, go and proclaim the kingdom of God.” Another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”   (Luke 9:57-62)

Why would someone want to look back when entering the kingdom of God? There are requirements for living in the Kingdom of God.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

Live by the Spirit, I say, and do not gratify the desires of the flesh. For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other, to prevent you from doing what you want. But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law. Now the works of the flesh are obvious: fornication, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, anger, quarrels, dissensions, factions, envy, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these. I am warning you, as I warned you before: those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.   (Galatians 5:16-21)

God wants to give us his kingdom, but we must also inherit it. This notion rules does not nullify grace, but it certainly rules out cheap grace. The kingdom of God is not something to be taken lightly. Jesus said:

“Do not be afraid, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom. Sell your possessions, and give alms. Make purses for yourselves that do not wear out, an unfailing treasure in heaven, where no thief comes near and no moth destroys. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.   (Luke 12:32-34)

There is no room in the kingdom of God for the love of this world. God wants to expand our hearts so that we may truly value what is good and lasting. Those who live in the kingdom do not live as those in the world. Continuing in today’s Epistle reading, Paul writes

By contrast, the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. There is no law against such things. And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. If we live by the Spirit, let us also be guided by the Spirit.   (Galatians 5:22-25)

To receive the kingdom of God is to repent, believe and confess Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. To inherit the kingdom of God is to be guided by the Holy Spirit. If we look back to the world we are taking our hands off the plow. Yes, there is work to be done in the kingdom on this earth. Each of us is given a plow. We should be willing to work in the field.

We do not earn the kingdom. We all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. It is given to us through the cross of Jesus Christ. To live in the kingdom is to live by the Spirit, however. Our direction and purpose can no longer be governed by the things of this world.

Jesus said:

“Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven. On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many deeds of power in your name?’ Then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; go away from me, you evildoers.’   (Matthew 7:21-23)

Are we fit for the kingdom? A better question may be: Is the Holy Spirit fitting us for the kingdom. We cannot do it alone. But let us fear not, God is with us. Are we with God?

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C

Third Sunday in Lent, Year C

This Is My Name Forever

God had a special purpose for Moses. He had watched over Moses and protected him, preparing him for an encounter that we read about today. From the Book of Exodus:

Then Moses said, “I must turn aside and look at this great sight, and see why the bush is not burned up.” When the Lord saw that he had turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, “Moses, Moses!” And he said, “Here I am.” Then he said, “Come no closer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.” He said further, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.” And Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.   (Exodus 3:3-6)

God called out to Moses. When Moses discovered that God was the one who was calling him, he hid his face. We are made in the image of God, but we are not God. God’s presence can be overwhelming.

We remember God’s call to Isaiah when the prophet exclaimed:

“Woe is me! I am lost, for I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips; yet my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!”   (Isaiah 6:5)

God has been calling many of us. He has been calling us all our lives. Are we ready for our encounter with him? We may think that we already know God. That was true of Job. But Job had his encountered God, he discovered another whole dimension of God. God has a question for Job:

“Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?
    Tell me, if you have understanding.
Who determined its measurements—surely you know!
    Or who stretched the line upon it?   (Job 38:4-5)

We do not have encounters with God without a reason. God had a specific plan and purpose for Moses. Moses was called to deliver the Israelites from slavery in Egypt and lead them to a new land which God had promised to give to the descendants of Abraham.

Moses protested against his call with several excuses. His first excuse was –  “Who am I?” God has to tell Moses that it is not about who he is but who God i. Again, from Exodus:

But Moses said to God, “If I come to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” God said to Moses, “I am who I am.” He said further, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘I am has sent me to you.’” God also said to Moses, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you’:

This is my name forever,
and this my title for all generations.”   (Exodus 3:13-15)

Do we understand who the one is who calls us? His name is “Yahweh.” He is the great “I AM.”

He never had a beginning. Nobody made God. God simply is. He did not come into being because he is being. God is absolute reality. There is no reality before him. God will always be.

God is utterly independent. He depends on nothing to bring him into being or support him or counsel him or make him what he is. Everything that is not God depends totally on God. We live only by his breath.

God is constant. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. He cannot be improved. He is not becoming anything. He is who he is.

God brings us into being and sustains our lives. He calls us and gives us a ministry. It may seem too much for us, and it is. But with God all things are possible. He stands behind and supports us in all that he asks us to do.

How do we respond to him. We might say that we have not had an encounter with God. God is always at the ready. Are we now ready to listen. This Lenten Season offers us an opportunity to focus on God. He wants us to know who he is. He wants us to understand how great he is. He wants us to experience the power of his name.

From the Book of Proverbs:

The name of the Lord is a strong tower;
    the righteous run into it and are safe.   (Proverbs 18:10)

God wants us to run to him. He has heard all the excuses before. Why would we waste his time with our excuses? The psalmist wrote:

O God, you are my God; eagerly I seek you;
my soul thirsts for you, my flesh faints for you,
as in a barren and dry land where there is no water.

Therefore I have gazed upon you in your holy place,
that I might behold your power and your glory.   (Psalm 63:1-2)

Are we still hesitant to approach God? Do we not know who he is and what he can do? He is without limit. God is calling us. God is ready to empower us. He is ready to bless us. He has called us to produce good fruit for his kingdom.

Jesus told the parable of the barren fig tree:

“A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.'”   (Luke 13:5-9)

Moses tried to resist God at first, but, ultimately became the law giver. He was, perhaps, the greatest figure in the Old Testament. He was great because God was with him. He learned to trust God and walk daily with him.

God has been patient with us. But now is the time to fulfill our destiny. Now is the time to bear fruit. Now is the time to allow God to glorify himself through us. Amen.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eucharist, homily, Jesus, lectionary, Lent, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C