Tag Archives: bodily resurrection

Second Sunday of Easter

My Lord and My God

The discipleThomas is remembered as “Doubting Thomas.” That may be a little unfair to him. To be sure, he was a skeptic concerning the resurrection of Jesus:

Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with the other disciples when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”   (John 20:24-25)

No one had ever been raised from the dead before. Thomas was confused about the mission of Jesus. On the other hand, Thomas was a faithful disciple. He was willing to sacrifice for what he believed was the cause of Christ. As Jesus was speaking about going to Jerusalem, which proved to be his last trip there, Thomas was aware of the danger involved:

Then Thomas said to the rest of the disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”   (John 11:16)

Following Jesus is not easy. Thomas faltered, but Thomas quickly recovered. Reading from John:

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”   (John 20:26-29)

The ministry of the Apostle Thomas proved that he could go the distance with God’s help.

Thomas was not the only one who touched to risen Lord. Reading from 1 John:

We declare to you what was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we have looked at and touched with our hands, concerning the word of life– this life was revealed, and we have seen it and testify to it, and declare to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was revealed to us– we declare to you what we have seen and heard so that you also may have fellowship with us; and truly our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. We are writing these things so that our joy may be complete.   (1 John 1:1-4)

The risen Lord was not a ghost. He was real. He was and is so real that the faith of the Early Church could not be shaken. Even though we did not see the resurrected Lord, we know by faith that disciples and many others did see him and interacted with him. because of their strong faith we believe. Jesus spoke of us:

“Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

The testimony of others helps establish the faith in new believers. What about our testimony? One definition of the word “testimony” is: firsthand authentication of a fact: EVIDENCE. Do our words and actions authenticate Jesus? Jesus has touched us. Have we touched Jesus? Are we in fellowship with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ?

Thomas touched Jesus and said: My Lord and my God. what do we say about him each day? Thomas went forward with a powerful testimony. God is counting on us to do the same. Many people are waiting to believe our strong report.

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Thursday in Easter Wee5

The Resurrection of the Body 

The bodily resurrection of Jesus is debated by certain biblical scholars and theologians. Today’s reading from the Gospel of Luke leaves little doubt, however:

While the disciples were talking about how they had seen Jesus risen from the dead, Jesus himself stood among them and said to them, “Peace be with you.” They were startled and terrified, and thought that they were seeing a ghost. He said to them, “Why are you frightened, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? Look at my hands and my feet; see that it is I myself. Touch me and see; for a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have.” And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. While in their joy they were disbelieving and still wondering, he said to them, “Have you anything here to eat?” They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate in their presence.  (Luke 24:36-42)

Christianity is not Eastern mysticism. It is not about the destruction of the self. It is not about being entrapped in a human form and trying to escape. Christianity is about the resurrection of the body and the soul. Jesus was raised up bodily. We will also be raised in bodily form along with Him, provided that we believe in Him. The Apostle Paul writes:

Now if Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. And if the Spirit of Him who raised Jesus from the dead lives in you, then He who raised Christ from the dead will also bring your mortal bodies to life through His Spirit who lives in you. (Romans 8:10-12)

Is His Spirit living in us? If we do not have the Holy Spirit then we do not have eternal life with God. The Spirit is Holy. We must live Holy. Without holiness no one will see God. We must lead righteous lives. Righteousness is not optional, even for Christian believers. Christian belief makes righteousness possible. The psalmist writes:

Open to me the gates of righteousness,
    that I may enter through them
    and give thanks to the Lord.

This is the gate of the Lord;
    the righteous shall enter through it.   (Psalm 118:19-20)

By His death and resurrection Jesus has open for us the gates of righteousness. We must walk through it and remain on the path. The Spirit will lead us into all truth, but we must follow the Spirit. Are we listening to that still, small voice dwelling within us?

We can be comforted to know that life does go on after death. We will have a body and we will be recognizable just as the risen Lord was to his disciples. We will eat and enjoy food. What will be different? We will be living in the everlasting presence and glory of God.

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