Tag Archives: authority

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 24A

Track 1: The Glory of God

Exodus 33:12-23
Psalm 99
1 Thessalonians 1:1-10
Matthew 22:15-22

We are living in the last days. Jesus said that we will not know the day or the hour in which he returns, but we should know the season. What will his return be like? Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew

Then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven: and then shall all the tribes of the earth mourn, and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory.   (Matthew 24:30)

Why would some people mourn at his coming? Because he is coming with power and great glory. Encountering the glory of God can be unnerving. It was for the children of Israel in the wilderness. At Sinai God spoke to his chosen people directly:

These words the Lord spoke with a loud voice to your whole assembly at the mountain, out of the fire, the cloud, and the thick darkness, and he added no more. He wrote them on two stone tablets, and gave them to me. When you heard the voice out of the darkness, while the mountain was burning with fire, you approached me, all the heads of your tribes and your elders; and you said, “Look, the Lord our God has shown us his glory and greatness, and we have heard his voice out of the fire. Today we have seen that God may speak to someone and the person may still live. So now why should we die? For this great fire will consume us; if we hear the voice of the Lord our God any longer, we shall die. For who is there of all flesh that has heard the voice of the living God speaking out of fire, as we have, and remained alive? Go near, you yourself, and hear all that the Lord our God will say. Then tell us everything that the Lord our God tells you, and we will listen and do it.” (Deuteronomy 5:22-27)

The children of Israel worried that the fire of God would consume them. They were not too far from the truth in their thinking. The Prophet Malachi forecast the coming of the Lord, but warned that his presence might be hard for many to endure:

See, I am sending my messenger to prepare the way before me, and the Lord whom you seek will suddenly come to his temple. The messenger of the covenant in whom you delight—indeed, he is coming, says the Lord of hosts. But who can endure the day of his coming, and who can stand when he appears? For he is like a refiner’s fire and like fullers’ soap.      (Malachi 3:1-2)

God is a holy God. His glory and presence exposes sinful hearts. Though the children of said that they would do whatever God asked them to do trough Moses, history did not prove that they were honest. They were unwilling to obey God’s law. They, in fact, knew that about themselves, so they could not stand to be in God’s presence.

Are we like the children of Israel today? Or are we like Moses. Moses wanted to be in God’s presence. He sought ever more of God. He asked God to reveal to him his glory:

Moses said, “Show me your glory, I pray.” And he said, “I will make all my goodness pass before you, and will proclaim before you the name, ‘The Lord’; and I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy. But,” he said, “you cannot see my face; for no one shall see me and live.” And the Lord continued, “See, there is a place by me where you shall stand on the rock; and while my glory passes by I will put you in a cleft of the rock, and I will cover you with my hand until I have passed by; then I will take away my hand, and you shall see my back; but my face shall not be seen.”   (Exodus 33:18-23)

What made Moses different from the others? He approached God from a very different perspective. Though he was not perfect, Moses had a heart for God. He loved God more than the cares of this world. He wanted to please God. He wanted to fellowship with God.

Because God was displeased with the children of Israel he told Moses to lead them to the promised land without his accompaniment. But Moses would not head Israel to the promised land without God’s presence. He realized that God’s very presence was worth more than anything in this world. He would rather remain in the wilderness with God than lose his presence.

As Christians, God has opened to door for us to enter directly into his presence. We have the right to enter into his glory. On the cross Jesus paid the price for our sin in order that the gates of heaven would be open to us. In Matthew we read:

Then Jesus cried again with a loud voice and breathed his last. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. The earth shook, and the rocks were split. The tombs also were opened, and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised.   (Matthew 27:50-52)

The gates have been opened. Will we enter into his presence? We will if we love him more that this world. We will if we are willing to be honest about our sin. We will if we approach him with a humble and contrite heart. But if we are holding on the sin that we do not wish to release to God, then our hearts will convict us whenever we are aware of his presence.

Jesus is returning with all his glory. Will we be glad to see him or will we be ashamed? Jesus said:

Those who are ashamed of me and of my words, of them the Son of Man will be ashamed when he comes in his glory and the glory of the Father and of the holy angels.   (Luke 9:26)

Will we be able to say, as did the Apostle Paul?

I am not ashamed, for I know the one in whom I have put my trust, and I am sure that he is able to guard until that day what I have entrusted to him.   (2 Timothy 1:12)

Track 2:  Honoring Authority

Isaiah 45:1-7
Psalm 96:1-9, (10-13)
1 Thessalonians 1:1-10
Matthew 22:15-22

Roman rule was hated by the Jewish people. They despised having to pay taxes to the Roman emperor. Knowing this, the Pharisees though they had found a perfect trap for Jesus. They would trick Jesus, in front of a crowd of people, by making him appear to favor Rome in a dispute over taxes:

The Pharisees went and plotted to entrap Jesus in what he said. So they sent their disciples to him, along with the Herodians, saying, “Teacher, we know that you are sincere, and teach the way of God in accordance with truth, and show deference to no one; for you do not regard people with partiality. Tell us, then, what you think. Is it lawful to pay taxes to the emperor, or not?” But Jesus, aware of their malice, said, “Why are you putting me to the test, you hypocrites? Show me the coin used for the tax.” And they brought him a denarius. Then he said to them, “Whose head is this, and whose title?” They answered, “The emperor’s.” Then he said to them, “Give therefore to the emperor the things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” When they heard this, they were amazed; and they left him and went away.   (Matthew 22:15-22)

Jesus did not dismiss the practice of paying taxes to Rome. He simply put it into proper perspective. We are to honor governing authorities. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Let every person be subject to the governing authorities; for there is no authority except from God, and those authorities that exist have been instituted by God. Therefore whoever resists authority resists what God has appointed, and those who resist will incur judgment. For rulers are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad. Do you wish to have no fear of the authority? Then do what is good, and you will receive its approval; for it is God’s servant for your good. But if you do what is wrong, you should be afraid, for the authority[a]does not bear the sword in vain! It is the servant of God to execute wrath on the wrongdoer. Therefore one must be subject, not only because of wrath but also because of conscience. For the same reason you also pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, busy with this very thing. Pay to all what is due them—taxes to whom taxes are due, revenue to whom revenue is due, respect to whom respect is due, honor to whom honor is due.   (Romans 13:1-7)

We are living in a rebellious time in the country. Some do not like the outcome of the last Presidential election. For some, anarchy is the solution. Defeat the current government by any means necessary. It this the Christian thing to do?

The Apostle Paul wrote to Timothy:

First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for everyone, for kings and all who are in high positions, so that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and dignity. This is right and is acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires everyone to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.   (1 Timothy 2:1-4)

Our goal is to tell others about the saving act of Jesus Christ, not to create a climate of chaos. Chaos is a very large distraction to the spread of the Gospel. If we do not honor governmental authorities we are not fostering “a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and dignity.”

The One who has established all authority is to receive the greatest honor.  The psalmist wrote:

Ascribe to the Lord the honor due his Name;
bring offerings and come into his courts.

Worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness;
let the whole earth tremble before him.

Tell it out among the nations: “The Lord is King!
he has made the world so firm that it cannot be moved;
he will judge the peoples with equity.”   (Psalm 96:8-10)

Jesus said: “Give therefore to the emperor the things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” God is the ultimate judge. He, alone, determines our ultimate destiny. Soon the Lord Jesus will return to the earth with all his glory. What will he find? Will he find us giving honor where honor is due? Again, Paul wrote:

Pay to all what is due them—taxes to whom taxes are due, revenue to whom revenue is due, respect to whom respect is due, honor to whom honor is due.   (Romans 13:7)

The God of all is due the greatest honor. Again, the psalmist writes:

I am the Lord, and there is no other;
besides me there is no god.
I arm you, though you do not know me,
so that they may know, from the rising of the sun
and from the west, that there is no one besides me;
I am the Lord, and there is no other.   (Psalm 96:5-6)

We honor him by keeping his commandments and following his Word.

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St. Philip and St. James

Greater Works Ministry

Today we celebrate the lives and ministries of the Apostles Philip and James, son of Alphaeus, often called “the Less.” He was called this name to distinguish him from James, the brother of John. Little is known about him. We know that he was chosen by Jesus and that he was among the twelve disciples on the Day of Pentecost. He was possibly an early witness to the resurrection if he is the James as recorded in 1 Corinthians 15:7.

James the Less was martyred for the Faith because he would not renounce Jesus as required by the Jewish high priest. Thus, James was faithful to the end and serves as an example for us all. Without the commitment of James and others like him we would not have the Church today.

Let us now turn to the Apostle Philip. In today’s New Testament reading, he seems to be having doubts when he asked Jesus a very important question:

Philip said to him, “Lord, show us the Father, and we will be satisfied.” Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you all this time, Philip, and you still do not know me? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, `Show us the Father’? Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works. Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; but if you do not, then believe me because of the works themselves. Very truly, I tell you, the one who believes in me will also do the works that I do and, in fact, will do greater works than these, because I am going to the Father. I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If in my name you ask me for anything, I will do it.”   (John 14:8-14)

When the words of Jesus sank in this same Philip became a great evangelist. He began performing the “greater works” which Jesus promised. The signs and wonders he performed made a great impact on the people of Samaria when he preached the word there:

Those who had been scattered preached the word wherever they went. Philip went down to a city in Samaria and proclaimed the Messiah there. When the crowds heard Philip and saw the signs he performed, they all paid close attention to what he said. For with shrieks, impure spirits came out of many, and many who were paralyzed or lame were healed. So there was great joy in that city.   (Acts 8:4-8)

How did the skeptic Philip grow into such a powerful ministry? He meditated on the teachings of Jesus. Jesus explained that the greater works that Philip and others were called to do would be accomplished in the same manner as Jesus’ own ministry on earth. Jesus did not do the works. He explained:

“The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works.”   (John 14:10)

Are we ready to step into the “greater works” ministry? We must first step into Jesus and the Father by faith. Then we must receive the promise from the Father which is the Holy Spirit. If a skeptic like Philip could answer the call then why should we remain a skeptic when there is an exciting ministry ahead?

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