Tag Archives: adoption

Day of Pentecost, Year C

Empowered by the Holy Spirit

Today we remember and celebrate the beginning of the Christian Church, when the Holy Spirit fell upon the early disciples. Reading from the second chapter of Acts:

When the day of Pentecost had come, the disciples were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.   (Acts 2:1-4)

The Day of Pentecost was the beginning of the great acts of the apostles of Jesus. It was the beginning but not the end. The promise of the Holy was for us today also. In his sermon of Pentecost, Peter preached:

In the last days, God says,
    I will pour out my Spirit on all people.
Your sons and daughters will prophesy,
    your young men will see visions,
    your old men will dream dreams.
Even on my servants, both men and women,
    I will pour out my Spirit in those days,
    and they will prophesy.   (Acts 2:17-18)

Many of his listeners were greatly moved and asked what they should do. Peter replied:

“Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. The promise is for you and your children and for all who are far off—for all whom the Lord our God will call.”   (Acts 2:38-39)

Peter makes it clear that the promise of the Holy Spirit was not just for the apostles. It was everyone, including those “who are far off.” That would include us.

Jesus made it very clear that the acts of the apostles were for anyone who believes in him:

Very truly, I tell you, the one who believes in me will also do the works that I do and, in fact, will do greater works than these, because I am going to the Father. I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If in my name you ask me for anything, I will do it.   ()

The acts are by the Holy Spirit. We must believe and receive the Holy Spirit. And we must do everything in the name of Jesus. The name of Jesus also means the character of Jesus. Jesus was led by the Spirit while on the earth. We are to be led by the same. The Apostle Paul writes:

All who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. For you did not receive a spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received a spirit of adoption. When we cry, “Abba! Father!” it is that very Spirit bearing witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs, heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ– if, in fact, we suffer with him so that we may also be glorified with him.   (Romans 8:14-17)

We are joint heirs with Christ because we have received a spirit of adoption. Our destiny is to be glorified along with him. The Bo0k of Acts did not have an ending. The acts are still going on. Are we participating?

What could possibly stop us? How could the power of the Spirit be dampened in us and in our churches? Perhaps through fear. Paul warns about falling back into fear. Fear is not from God. Paul encouraged his protege Timothy to rekindle the Spirit within him:

For this reason I remind you to rekindle the gift of God that is within you through the laying on of my hands; for God did not give us a spirit of cowardice, but rather a spirit of power and of love and of self-discipline.   (2 Timothy 1:6-7)

Satan is the one who uses fear. He wants to confuse us and make us forget our inheritance in Christ. How does he do it? Through intimidation, through ridicule, through persecution. Does the Church today need to be politically correct? Does the Church need to be relevant and make the world feel right at home? Too much “seeker friendly” perhaps? What is the answer? I am not sure, to be honest. But this much we should know, we will not be glorified with Jesus if we do not suffer with him.

We cannot avoid suffering and have the power of the Spirit working in us. Our own power is not what has advanced the Church. It is the Spirit of God which has established and enriches the Church. Let us stir up the gift that is within us. Let us anoint people in the name of Jesus and set them apart for the greater works that God has prepared for them. Let us fulfill our own calling, not by our  will and power, but by the will and power of God. And let us not be ruled by fear. God’s perfect love casts out fear:

There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear; for fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not reached perfection in love.   (1 John 4:18)

We are called to serve under Christ by his Spirit and power. We have been freed from the spirit of fear! God is perfecting us in his love. Let us have our own Pentecost, in our hearts and in our churches. Amen.

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First Sunday after Christmas, Year C

The Word Became Flesh

The Gospel of John does not have an Infancy narrative as do the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. Rather, John speaks of a time before the birth of the Christ Child. He writes of the One who pre-existed the world and was the very agent of all creation:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

Do we know Jesus beyond the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes? Many of His own Jewish people did not comprehend who Jesus was when they were privileged to see him in person:

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him.  (John 1:10-11)

The remarkable thing is that the creator God entered he world of His own creation on our behalf. He did so on our behalf. In Jesus, God made himself vulnerable to humankind, in order to reveal his true nature and heart:

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:14)

Though the Gospel of John does not speak about the infancy of Jesus, it does allude to a different sort of infancy narrative. It speaks of our infancy narrative. We are reborn as children of God in him. The Apostle Paul writes:

But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God.   (Galatians 4:4-7)

Do we recognize who Jesus is? Has his Spirit entered into our hearts? Only by his Spirit can we be reborn. We cannot become righteous on our own. The law of God can never make us righteous. It serves as our education concerning righteousness. Jesus, alone, is the one who makes us righteous. John writes:

From his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. The law indeed was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known.   (John 1:16-19)

As an infant Jesus was wrapped in swaddling clothes. From the Gospel of Luke:

And Mary brought forth her firstborn Son, and wrapped Him in swaddling cloths, and laid Him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.   (Luke 2:7)

Have we been wrapped by Jesus? The psalmist wrote:

I will greatly rejoice in the Lord,
my whole being shall exult in my God;

for he has clothed me with the garments of salvation,
he has covered me with the robe of righteousness,

as a bridegroom decks himself with a garland,
and as a bride adorns herself with her jewels.   (Isaiah 61:10)

As infants, we need the swaddling of the Holy Spirit. All we need to do is recognize our need and allow a loving Savior to wrap us in his love. The Christmas Season is a special time to experience the warmth of Jesus. At times we may feel all alone, but he is always with us. He is Immanuel, God with us. Let us bask in the glory and glow of his presence. Amen.

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