Category Archives: preaching

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 14


Track 1: The Word Is in Your Heart

Genesis 37:1-4, 12-28
Psalm 105:1-6, 16-22, 45b
Romans 10:5-15
Matthew 14:22-33

Today let us dive into the foundation of righteousness. Judaism understood that the only way of being righteous and pleasing God by the law was by keeping the entire Mosaic Law without fail. No one had ever done that before Jesus. Jesus lived his entire life without sin, thereby fulfilling the righteous requirements of the Law.

The Apostle Paul explains, however, that before the the Mosaic Law was given, there was Abraham:

What then are we to say was gained by Abraham, our ancestor according to the flesh? For if Abraham was justified by works, he has something to boast about, but not before God. For what does the scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness.” Now to one who works, wages are not reckoned as a gift but as something due. But to one who without works trusts him who justifies the ungodly, such faith is reckoned as righteousness.   (Romans 4:1-5)

In today’s Epistle reading, Paul goes into greater depth concerning the righteousness by faith:

Moses writes concerning the righteousness that comes from the law, that “the person who does these things will live by them.” But the righteousness that comes from faith says, “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will ascend into heaven?’” (that is, to bring Christ down) “or ‘Who will descend into the abyss?’” (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead). But what does it say?

“The word is near you,
on your lips and in your heart”

(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”   (Romans 10:5-11)

What is Paul saying? Jesus, the word made flesh, is the answer to righteousness. He is Emmanuel, God with us. Do we know2 him? If we do, he is ever so close to us.

But how do we know him? Mary Magdalene knew Jesus as her deliverer and closest friend. She was the first person to witness his resurrection. But she did not yet grasp who Jesus was when she encountered him after the resurrection. Jesus said to her:

“Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’”   (John 20:17)

Jesus was her friend, She did not want to lose him to heaven. We cannot bring Jesus down from heaven to experience him on our terms.

The Apostle Thomas was very loyal to Jesus. He loved him so much and could not accept that he had died. It was not so much a question of faith for him as much as it was his profound sense of loss. How could his Lord and friend have died?Thomas wanted to bring back Jesus from the dead in the form that he knew him. But Jesus was no longer that person. He was now present to everyone who believed in him and understood his death and resurrection. All that was required now was faith in the risen Lord to satisfy all our needs, including our need for a right standing before God.

Do we know this Jesus? Do we know him in our hearts? Is he on our lips? Are we ready to give our testimony that we are sinners saved by grace? We have done nothing to deserve this great gift. We have simply joined the ranks of Abraham. We have believed God and he has reckoned it as righteousness.

The paalmist wrote:

Give thanks to the Lord and call upon his Name;
make known his deeds among the peoples.

Sing to him, sing praises to him,
and speak of all his marvelous works.

Glory in his holy Name;
let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice.

Search for the Lord and his strength;
continually seek his face.   (Psalm 105:1-40)

Jesus is Lord of heaven and earth. But that does not tell us entirely who Jesus is. He wants to engrave his word in our hearts.

 

 

Track 2: Give Glory to God

1 Kings 19:9-18
Psalm 85:8-13
Romans 10:5-15
Matthew 14:22-33

Do you remember the phrase: “The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat”? This phrase pretty much describes what the Prophet Elijah esperienced in the Old Testament. Elijah had humiliated the prophets of Baal in a contest to prove to the people who’s God was real. God had sent fire from heaven upon the altar that Elijah setup while the altar of Baal failed to ignite. Not only did the false prophets lose the contest, they also lost their lives. Reading from First Kings:

King Ahab told Jezebel all that Elijah had done, and how he had killed all the prophets with the sword. Then Jezebel sent a messenger to Elijah, saying, “So may the gods do to me and more also, if I do not make your life as the life of one of them by this time tomorrow.” Then he was afraid, and he arose and ran for his life and came to Beersheba, which belongs to Judah, and left his servant there.   (1 Kings 19:1-3)

Hi=ow quickly had the scene changed fro Elijah:

At Horeb, the mount of God, Elijah came to a cave, and spent the night there. Then the word of the Lord came to him, saying, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He answered, “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”   (1 Kings 19:9-10)

In somewhat similar experience, Peter, on a lesser scale, pulled defeat out of the jaws of victory. It began when the disciples saw Jesus walking on the sea:

Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, but by this time the boat, battered by the waves, was far from the land, for the wind was against them. And early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.”   (Matthew 14:22-27)

Peter became excited when he realized that who he was seeing was Jesus and not a ghost:

Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. But when he noticed the strong wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?”   (Matthew 14:28-32)

I only know of two people who have walked upon the water: Jesus and Peter. I never have, Have you? So perhaps we should not be too critical of Peter.What went wrong for Peter? What went wrong for Elijah? Reading again from First Kings:

God said, “Go out and stand on the mountain before the Lord, for the Lord is about to pass by.” Now there was a great wind, so strong that it was splitting mountains and breaking rocks in pieces before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind; and after the wind an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake; and after the earthquake a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire; and after the fire a sound of sheer silence. When Elijah heard it, he wrapped his face in his mantle and went out and stood at the entrance of the cave. Then there came a voice to him that said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He answered, “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”  (1 Kings 19:11-14)

Elijah thought he was alone, facing evil and his potential death. He had just won a major victory over the prophets of Baal, because God was with him. Where did he go wrong? Perhaps he took his eyes off of God and could only see his circumstances, which were grave.Surely this was the case with Peter. Perhaps Elijah, in his mind, hand taken credit for the victory over Baal. Pride gowa before a fall.

God was not finished with Elijah. We was not finished with Peter either. God’s ministry never ceases. To Elijah he said:

Then the Lord said to him, “Go, return on your way to the wilderness of Damascus; when you arrive, you shall anoint Hazael as king over Aram. Also you shall anoint Jehu son of Nimshi as king over Israel; and you shall anoint Elisha son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah as prophet in your place. Whoever escapes from the sword of Hazael, Jehu shall kill; and whoever escapes from the sword of Jehu, Elisha shall kill. Yet I will leave seven thousand in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal, and every mouth that has not kissed him.”   (1 Kings 19:15-18)

Peter was bold, but Peter stumbled. He denied his Lord three times. Yet we remember that Jesus restored him. He became the rock and leader of the Early Church. His leadership and example has resonated down to this day.

God calls upon us to do his ministry, but it is his ministry, not ours. We cannot take credit for it. And when we stumble all is not lost. God still has a plan and he will continue to use us if we have a heart of repentance. So let us rejoice and leave all who we are and all that God has called us to do in the skillful hands of God.

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The Transfiguration

Changed into His Likeness

There was a moment when Jesus manifested His glory on the earth. We long for that moment to happen again. In today’s Gospel we read:

About eight days after Jesus had foretold his death and resurrection, Jesus took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray. And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. (Luke 9:28-29)

God also called Moses to come up His holy mountain:

Then Moses went up on the mountain, and the cloud covered the mountain. The glory of the LORD settled on Mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it for six days; on the seventh day he called to Moses out of the cloud. Now the appearance of the glory of the LORD was like a devouring fire on the top of the mountain in the sight of the people of Israel. Moses entered the cloud, and went up on the mountain. Moses was on the mountain for forty days and forty nights. (Exodus 24:15-18)

Something happens on the mount of God. His presence and His glory are there. God’s glory is like a “devouring fire.” It changes the participant. When Moses returned to the people his face shown with the glory of God.

God calls us up to His holy mount for a purpose – His purpose! There are those who are merely looking for spiritual thrills. False churches and false revivals have been birthed by misunderstandings and misinterpretations of the Holy. Many have been led astray by lying spirits and false angels because they were seeking signs and wonders rather than the Lord Jesus Christ, not realizing that Satan himself can disguise himself as an angel of light. The Apostle Paul reminds us:

Do not let anyone who delights in false humility and the worship of angels disqualify you. Such a person also goes into great detail about what they have seen; they are puffed up with idle notions by their unspiritual mind. They have lost connection with the head, from whom the whole body, supported and held together by its ligaments and sinews, grows as God causes it to grow.   (Colossians 2:18-19)

Peter was on the mount of transfiguration. This was not just a metaphorical experience. It was an actual event. We have this testimony in his own words:

We did not follow cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we had been eyewitnesses of his majesty. For he received honor and glory from God the Father when that voice was conveyed to him by the Majestic Glory, saying, “This is my Son, my Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.” (2 Peter 1″16-17)

Peter was told to focus on Jesus only. We are not to get distracted by anything, even by signs and wonders.

Is God calling us to come to His mount of transfiguration today? Yes, he is! Are we ready? We are not to seek spiritual experiences per se. Rather, let us seek Jesus and His glory. The Apostle Paul writes:

Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord. (2 Cor. 3:17-18)

We are transformed by whom or what we worship. Let our worship be the Lord Jesus Christ and Him only. He is the culmination of all the Law and the Prophets. Let us focus on Him and listen to His words. Let us look into His face and be transformed from glory to glory.

Very soon Jesus will be calling His Bride. We must wait with expectation with our oil lamps full. We want to be full of the Holy Spirit and emptied from the pleasures and distractions of this world. The ultimate transfiguration for us will be when we receive a glorified body in heaven. Now, however, we are called to grow closer to Jesus. This is the work of the Spirit. Our work is to believe and trust what the Spirit is doing in our lives and to seek him out each day. Let us remember that for many, we are the face of Jesus. What is our witness?

On the mount of transfiguration, Peter was overcome and lost focus:

Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah” —not knowing what he said.

God had a word for Peter:

While he was saying this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were terrified as they entered the cloud. Then from the cloud came a voice that said, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!”

This word is also a word for us. How are we being transformed? By the world or by Jesus?

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Ninth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 13

Track 1: Wrestling with God

Genesis 32:22-31
Psalm 17:1-7,16
Romans 9:1-5
Matthew 14:13-21

Jacob was on his way home, getting ready to face his brotherEsau. In today’s Gospel reading we pick up on the story:

The same night Jacob got up and took his two wives, his two maids, and his eleven children, and crossed the ford of the Jabbok. He took them and sent them across the stream, and likewise everything that he had. Jacob was left alone; and a man wrestled with him until daybreak. When the man saw that he did not prevail against Jacob, he struck him on the hip socket; and Jacob’s hip was put out of joint as he wrestled with him. Then he said, “Let me go, for the day is breaking.” But Jacob said, “I will not let you go, unless you bless me.” So he said to him, “What is your name?” And he said, “Jacob.” Then the man said, “You shall no longer be called Jacob, but Israel, for you have striven with God and with humans, and have prevailed.” Then Jacob asked him, “Please tell me your name.” But he said, “Why is it that you ask my name?” And there he blessed him. So Jacob called the place Peniel, saying, “For I have seen God face to face, and yet my life is preserved.” The sun rose upon him as he passed Penuel, limping because of his hip.   (Genesis 32:22-31)

Jacob’s wrestling was a physical one with God. He was just getting to know God on a more spiritual level. We remember Job from the Old Testament. His wrestling was a more spirirual one. Job stood head and shoulders above his contemporaries in terms of righteousness. Yet Job was under a severe test. He had lost everything that he had owned and even his body was inflicted with loathsome sores. Job did never cursed God as Satan had said he would. But he could not understand why he was experiencing such pain and loss. God’s answer was a surprise:

And the Lord said to Job:

“Shall a faultfinder contend with the Almighty?
Anyone who argues with God must respond.”

Then Job answered the Lord:

“See, I am of small account; what shall I answer you?
I lay my hand on my mouth.
I have spoken once, and I will not answer;
twice, but will proceed no further.”   (Job 40:1-5)

Have we ever been faultfinders with God? Life does not always seem fair. We may wonder why God has allowed us to undergo certain tribulations or persecutions, although Jesus warned this disciples that they would come.

Ultimately,Job achieved a breakthrough with God:

Then Job answered the Lord:

“I know that you can do all things,
and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted.
‘Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’
Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand,
things too wonderful for me, which I did not know.
‘Hear, and I will speak;
I will question you, and you declare to me.’
I had heard of you by the hearing of the ear,
but now my eye sees you;
therefore I despise myself,
and repent in dust and ashes.”   (Job 42:1-6)

Our wrestling with God will change us. It will not leave us in the same condition before the encounter. Jacob’s name was changed to Israel. His hip was put out of joint. But he was able to meet his brother Esau, and receive his forgiveness. What is more telling is how he settled in Cannan:

Jacob came safely to the city of Shechem, which is in the land of Canaan, on his way from Paddan-aram; and he camped before the city. And from the sons of Hamor, Shechem’s father, he bought for one hundred pieces of money the plot of land on which he had pitched his tent. There he erected an altar and called it El-Elohe-Israel.   (Genesis 33:18-20).

For Jacob, now Israel, the God of Abraham and Isaac had become the God of Israel.

Where do we stand with God today? He is the creator of the universe and the God and Father of us all. But is he our God? If we do not give up, if we keep on wrestling with God, he will bless us. Jacob and Job did not give up  They came to know God on a much deeper level. That is where God wants to meet us. He loves us so much.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.

“Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.   (John 3:16-17)

 

 

Track 2; Loaves and Fishes

Isaiah 55:1-5
Psalm 145: 8-9, 15-22
Romans 9:1-5
Matthew 14:13-21

In today’s Gospel reading we have the feeding of the five thousand:

Jesus withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns. When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick. When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus said to them, “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” They replied, “We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish.” And he said, “Bring them here to me.” Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full. And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children.   (Matthew 14:13-21)

Notice that Jesus asked his disciples to do something that was impossible for them. He said: “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” When God calls us to do something we know it is of God when it is beyond our means to do it. God called Moses to do the impossible. He asked him to go and lead the children of Israel into the Promised Land. Moses was afraid that no one would believe:

“But suppose they do not believe me or listen to me, but say, ‘The Lord did not appear to you.’” The Lord said to him, “What is that in your hand?” He said, “A staff.” And he said, “Throw it on the ground.” So he threw the staff on the ground, and it became a snake; and Moses drew back from it. Then the Lord said to Moses, “Reach out your hand, and seize it by the tail”—so he reached out his hand and grasped it, and it became a staff in his hand — “so that they may believe that the Lord, the God of their ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has appeared to you.”   (Exodus 4:1-5)

To Moses his staff was just a rod, to God it was an instrument for miracles. If we wish to do ministry we must begin somewhere. God asks us to begin with whatever we find in our hands. Say, for instance, you are a carpenter. You want to do something in the name of Jesus for the sake of the Gospel. Perhaps you could help build houses for the poor and homeless. This could be monumental task.Habitat for Humanity had a very small and humble beginning. But look how God has blessed this ministry.

The Prophet Zechariah had a vision:

The angel who talked with me came again, and wakened me, as one is wakened from sleep. He said to me, “What do you see?” And I said, “I see a lampstand all of gold, with a bowl on the top of it; there are seven lamps on it, with seven lips on each of the lamps that are on the top of it. And by it there are two olive trees, one on the right of the bowl and the other on its left.” I said to the angel who talked with me, “What are these, my lord?” Then the angel who talked with me answered me, “Do you not know what these are?” I said, “No, my lord.” He said to me, “This is the word of the Lord to Zerubbabel: Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord of hosts. What are you, O great mountain? Before Zerubbabel you shall become a plain; and he shall bring out the top stone amid shouts of ‘Grace, grace to it!

Moreover the word of the Lord came to me, saying, “The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation of this house; his hands shall also complete it. Then you will know that the Lord of hosts has sent me to you. For whoever has despised the day of small things shall rejoice, and shall see the plummet in the hand of Zerubbabel.   (Zechariah 4:1-10)

We should not despise small beginnings. Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord of hosts.

All of us have limitations, but God is not limited. When we work in partnership with him, when we put our trust in him, when we believe what he is telling us, when we exercise our faith, all things are possible.

The psalmist wrote:

The Lord is near to those who call upon him,
to all who call upon him faithfully.

He fulfills the desire of those who fear him;
he hears their cry and helps them.

The Lord preserves all those who love him,
but he destroys all the wicked.

My mouth shall speak the praise of the Lord;
let all flesh bless his holy Name for ever and ever.   (Psalm 145:19-22)

Let us begin any ministry with praise to God. Let us call upon him for help and support. Let us listen carefully to what he tells us todo. Jesus gave his disciples instructions. When they followed them five thousand men, besides women and children, were fed.

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Eighth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 12

Track 1:  Dishonesty

Genesis 29:15-28
Psalm 105:1-11, 45b
or Psalm 128
Romans 8:26-39
Matthew 13:31-33,44-52

Jacob had tricked his brother Saul our of his birthright. Not only that, he had stolen his Father Isaac’s final blessing. In today’s reading from Genesis we see that he has met his match in his Uncle Laban:

Laban said to Jacob, “Because you are my kinsman, should you therefore serve me for nothing? Tell me, what shall your wages be?” Now Laban had two daughters; the name of the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel. Leah’s eyes were lovely, and Rachel was graceful and beautiful. Jacob loved Rachel; so he said, “I will serve you seven years for your younger daughter Rachel.” Laban said, “It is better that I give her to you than that I should give her to any other man; stay with me.” So Jacob served seven years for Rachel, and they seemed to him but a few days because of the love he had for her.

Then Jacob said to Laban, “Give me my wife that I may go in to her, for my time is completed.” So Laban gathered together all the people of the place, and made a feast. But in the evening he took his daughter Leah and brought her to Jacob; and he went in to her. (Laban gave his maid Zilpah to his daughter Leah to be her maid.) When morning came, it was Leah! And Jacob said to Laban, “What is this you have done to me? Did I not serve with you for Rachel? Why then have you deceived me?” Laban said, “This is not done in our country—giving the younger before the firstborn. Complete the week of this one, and we will give you the other also in return for serving me another seven years.” Jacob did so, and completed her week; then Laban gave him his daughter Rachel as a wife.   (Genesis 29:15-28)

Laban was deceptive. He was dishonest. But notice his easy it was for Laban to justify his actions. Is not this like most deceptive people, if they are cornered in their lie.

God the Father hates lies. We read from Provers:

Lying lips are an abomination to the Lord,
but those who act faithfully are his delight.   (Proverbs 12:22)

Jesus honored those who were truthful:

When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!”   (John 1:47)

Why do we lie? To understand that we need to go back to the very beginning = the time when the first and worst lie of all was told. From Genesis:

 Now the serpent was more crafty than any other wild animal that the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God say, ‘You shall not eat from any tree in the garden’?” The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden; but God said, ‘You shall not eat of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden, nor shall you touch it, or you shall die.’” But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate; and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate.   (Genesis 3;1-6)

Jesus said that Satan is the Father of lies. He was a liar from the begging (John 8:44).. His specialty is deception and twisting the truth of God’s Word. Satan tries to convince us that we do not need God. We can go it alone, beause Satan has imparted wisdom to us. Jacob wanted to go it alone and prove himself. Laban wanted to do the same. This does not breed cooperation and harmony.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

The god of this age has blinded the minds of unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel that displays the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.   (2 Corinthians 4:4)

But life teaches us that we cannot go it alone. We are made in God’s image. We must live in partnership with God. Jesus has come to reestablish that partnership. He paid a great price that we might. It is up to us, however, to hold on to that truth.

We live iu an age of great deception. Politicians assure us that they are telling the truth, when the truth is far from them. The news media tells one lie father another. When they are caught they never apologize. Even Church leaders misleads us and attempt to manipulate us. Now, more than ever, we need to seek the truth of God’s Word. Only that will set us free. Jesus said:

Then Jesus said to the Jews who had believed in him, “If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples; and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.”   (John 8:30-32)

Let us continue to be the light of Christ in a very dark world.

 

 

Track 2: The Pearl at Great Price

1 Kings 3:5-12
Psalm 119:129-136
Romans 8:26-39
Matthew 13:31-33,44-52

Jesus taught in many parables. This is one of my favorite from today’s Gospel reading:

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.”   (Matthew 13:45-46)

What does this parable tell us about the kingdom of heaven? It tells us that the kingdom is available to us. But, like the merchant, we must want it and search for it. From the Prophet Jeremiah:

Then when you call upon me and come and pray to me, I will hear you. When you search for me, you will find me; if you seek me with all your heart,   (Jeremiah 29:12-13)

From the Sermon on the Mount found in Matthew’s Gospel:

Therefore do not worry, saying, ‘What will we eat?’ or ‘What will we drink?’ or ‘What will we wear?’ For it is the Gentiles who strive for all these things; and indeed your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.   (Matthew 6:31-33)

There is a price involved on our part. The merchant sold all that he had to purchase the pearl of great value. The kingdom is of such high value that it is more valuable than anything we might have. I( we do not value the kingdom then we may miss it. But when we find the kingdom we will never want to lose it. The psalmist wrote:

Your decrees are wonderful;
therefore I obey them with all my heart.

When your word goes forth it gives light;
it gives understanding to the simple.

I open my mouth and pant;
I long for your commandments.

 Turn to me in mercy,
as you always do to those who love your Name.

Steady my footsteps in your word;
let no iniquity have dominion over me.   (Psalm 119:129-133)

We are living in a very dark time. In fact, the darkness is increasing. Now, more than ever, we need God. The Prophet Isaiah wrote:

Seek the Lord while he may be found,
    call upon him while he is near;
let the wicked forsake their way,
    and the unrighteous their thoughts;
let them return to the Lord, that he may have mercy on them,
    and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.   (Isaiah 55:6-7)

God is drawing near to us, The final harvest will soon be upon us. Where do we stand? Have we found the kingdom? Have we found the Lord? If so, what price do we bring to him? He has given us his all. He has redeemed us by the blood of his Son Jesus. He is ready to reconcile us to himself: The Apostle Paul wrote:

So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting the message of reconciliation to us.   (2 Corinthians 5:17-19)

Are we in Christ today? Today is the day of salvation. Today beings the kingdom of heaven for all who believe and embrace the Lord Jesus. He is the treasure. He is the kingdom.

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