Category Archives: Pentecost

Saint Andrew, Apostle

José_de_Ribera_San_AndrésThe Word is Near You

The Gospel of John states that Andrew was first a disciple of John the Baptist:

The next day John again was standing with two of his disciples, and as he watched Jesus walk by, he exclaimed, “Look, here is the Lamb of God!” The two disciples heard him say this, and they followed Jesus. When Jesus turned and saw them following, he said to them, “What are you looking for?” They said to him, “Rabbi” (which translated means Teacher), “where are you staying?” He said to them, “Come and see.” They came and saw where he was staying, and they remained with him that day. It was about four o’clock in the afternoon. One of the two who heard John speak and followed him was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother. He first found his brother Simon and said to him, “We have found the Messiah” (which is translated Anointed).   (John 1:35-41)

What is remarkable about Andrew is that he recognized Jesus as the Messiah almost at once. Andrew was excited to tell his brother Simon Peter. He started his career as a disciple by becoming an evangelist.

He was a very ordinary man – a fisherman along with his brother. Yet his testimony as an apostle of Jesus Christ helped to change the whole world. The Apostle Paul writes:

“Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.”   (Romans 10:18)

God calls ordinary people to do extraordinary things in His name. We have also been called to be disciples of Jesus and evangelists. We have been given power and authority to do so.

Where do we start? We start with the Word as did Andrew and all the apostles. Moses explained the power of God’s Word:

Moses said to the people of Israel: Surely, this commandment that I am commanding you today is not too hard for you, nor is it too far away. It is not in heaven, that you should say, “Who will go up to heaven for us, and get it for us so that we may hear it and observe it?” Neither is it beyond the sea, that you should say, “Who will cross to the other side of the sea for us, and get it for us so that we may hear it and observe it?” No, the word is very near to you; it is in your mouth and in your heart for you to observe.   (Deuteronomy 30:11-14)

We have been given a powerful Word from God – Jesus Christ, the Word made flesh. He has been placed within our hearts. The Apostle Paul elaborates on what Moses said

“The word is near you, on your lips and in your heart”
(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved.   (Romans 10:8-10)

Are we ready to proclaim the Word that changes the hearts of people? We will be ridiculed for doing so, but we will probable not have to endure the suffering and ultimate death by crucifixion as did Andrew. We owe him and all the apostles a great debt of gratitude. Let us remember that in our day many people are dependent upon us to share the good news.

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Thanksgiving Day

breaking of breadA Sacrifice 0f Praise and Thanksgiving

Deuteronomy 26:1-11
Psalm 100
Philippians 4:4-9
John 6:25-35

Observing a day of thanksgiving is an ancient tradition. While the Children of Israel were still in the wilderness, God instituted a day of thanksgiving, Moses announced:

The Lord brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm, with a terrifying display of power, and with signs and wonders; and he brought us into this place and gave us this land, a land flowing with milk and honey. So now I bring the first of the fruit of the ground that you, O Lord, have given me.” You shall set it down before the Lord your God and bow down before the Lord your God. Then you, together with the Levites and the aliens who reside among you, shall celebrate with all the bounty that the Lord your God has given to you and to your house.   (Deuteronomy 26:8-11)

The Israelites had not yet received the promise land and did not have any first fruits to present to God. Nonetheless, God instructed them to remember that he had brought them out of Egypt with signs and wonders and protected them on their journey. They were to celebrate and remember what God had done in an annual celebration called First Fruits.

During hard times we may find it difficult to celebrate. How do with give thanks in time of lack?  The Apostle Paul wrote that we should begin by counting our blessings. When we make our requests before God we should do it with thanksgiving:

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 4:4-7)

Thanksgiving and praise is a way of entering into the presence of God. The psalmist wrote:

Enter his gates with thanksgiving;
go into his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and call upon his Name.

For the LORD is good;
his mercy is everlasting;
and his faithfulness endures from age to age.   (Psalm 100:4-5)

During times of great material blessings we face a different challenge. We may become too satisfied with those blessings. The tempter will always try to distract us with temporal things as he did with Jesus:

The tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written,

‘One does not live by bread alone,
    but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”   (Matthew 4:3-4)

In today’s Gospel reading Jesus warned us against putting temporal blessings ahead of that which is eternal:

Do not work for the food that perishes, but for the food that endures for eternal life, which the Son of Man will give you. For it is on him that God the Father has set his seal.”

The people who had received a miraculous feeding from Jesus and were looking for more of the same. They equated this miracle with the miracle of the manna that God gave to Israel in the wilderness. Jesus taught them that there would be a greater blessing in store for them if they could receive it:

Our ancestors ate the manna in the wilderness; as it is written, `He gave them bread from heaven to eat.'” Then Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, it was not Moses who gave you the bread from heaven, but it is my Father who gives you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is that which comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.” They said to him, “Sir, give us this bread always.”

Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.”   (John 6:31-33)

Jesus was referring to receiving his body and blood through Holy Communion. The word that is used for Communion in many liturgical churches is “Eucharist.” This word comes from the Greek noun εὐχαριστία (eucharistia) which means “thanksgiving.”

Thanksgiving Day in America is a special day of celebration with family and friends. We remember that America is a gift to us from God, and not to us only, but also to the world. There are dark forces that want us to ridicule and curse America, and even God. We are told that it is wrong to celebrate America. It is out of place to give praise. This is so far from the truth of God’s Holy Word.

Let us continually celebrate and remember what God has done for us. Let us remember that God is the one who established America, though our founding fathers had to understand what he was doing and be willing to sacrifice their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor. What are we prepared to sacrifice today? Are we still willing to give even a sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving before the naysayers?

America is still a work in progress. Liberty and justice for all is still a dream. But should that stop our praise? In Hebrews we read:

For here we have no lasting city, but we are looking for the city that is to come. Through him, then, let us continually offer a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that confess his name. Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.   (Hebrews 13:14-16)

Perfection will be attained only in the Millennial Reign of Christ. Let us strive together, as a people, to work toward that perfection which only Jesus consummate. Let us do so with prayer and thanksgiving unto God.

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Christ the King, Last Sunday after Pt.

Surely I Am Coming Soon

Ezekiel 34:11-16, 20-24
Psalm 100 or Psalm 95:1-7a
Ephesians 1:15-23
Matthew 25:31-46

In America we may difficulty understanding kingdoms. We deliberately do not have a king. Kings can become corrupt. We fought the Revolutionary War agains a king. Yet today, we are part of a kingdom. The question is: “What kingdom are we apart?” There are two kingdoms. One is corrupt and one is perfect and pure.

The Prophet Ezekiel wrote about God establishing a new kingdom. Israel had begged God for a king so that they could be like other nations around them. God reluctantly gave them a king. Saul was their first king, but Saul became corrupt. Therefore, God was going to take matters in his own hands. From today’s Old Testament reading:

I myself will be the shepherd of my sheep, and I will make them lie down, says the Lord God. I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the strayed, and I will bind up the injured, and I will strengthen the weak, but the fat and the strong I will destroy. I will feed them with justice.

Therefore, thus says the Lord God to them: I myself will judge between the fat sheep and the lean sheep. Because you pushed with flank and shoulder, and butted at all the weak animals with your horns until you scattered them far and wide, I will save my flock, and they shall no longer be ravaged; and I will judge between sheep and sheep.

I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd. And I, the Lord, will be their God, and my servant David shall be prince among them; I, the Lord, have spoken.   (Ezekiel 34:15-24)

God established a new kingdom under his servant David. This kingdom would correct the mistakes of the first kingdom. And this kingdom would be a lasting kingdom. I would never be destroyed. The psalmist wrote:

Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom,
    and your dominion endures throughout all generations.

The Lord is faithful in all his words,
    and gracious in all his deeds.
The Lord upholds all who are falling,
    and raises up all who are bowed down.   (Psalm 145:13-14)

As we know, historically, David’s kingdom was disrupted. Several kingdoms took over Israel. It was disrupted on the earth, though not entirely. Jewish tradition and worship continued. The Dravidic kingdom, however, continued in the heaven-lies. Jesus said that his kingdom was not of this earth when he testified before Pilat. Not yet, he taught us to pray to God the Father: “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as ii is in heaven.”

Jesus began establishing his everlasting kingdom on the earth with his resurrection. Having paid the price of sin, he was raised from the dead by the power of the Holy Spirit. The Apostle Paul wrote:

I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power. God put this power to work in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and above every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the age to come.   (Ephesians 1:17-21)

This powerful king will soon be returning to the earth. In the meantime, the kingdom of darkness is still advancing upon the earth, the kingdom of Satan and his minions. Christians now live in this kingdom, but are not a part of this kingdom. The Apostle Paul wrote:

All of us once lived among them in the passions of our flesh, following the desires of flesh and senses, and we were by nature children of wrath, like everyone else. But God, who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us even when we were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ —by grace you have been saved —  and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the ages to come he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.   (Ephesians 2:3-7)

We have been set apart from the kingdom of this dark world. This darkness has grown so great that people are crying out for justice. Evil is now considered good by many, and good is now evil. Soon this will be corrected. From today’s Gospel reading:

Jesus said, “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and he will put the sheep at his right hand and the goats at the left. Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink? And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you, or naked and gave you clothing? And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?’ And the king will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.’   (Matthew 25:31-40)

We are part of a kingdom prepared for us the foundation of the world. WE will no longer suffer by the hands of the unrighteous. God said through Ezekiel:

I will save my flock, and they shall no longer be ravaged; and I will judge between sheep and sheep.   (Ezekiel 34:22)

On the other hand, the guilty will be punished:

Then he will say to those at his left hand, ‘You that are accursed, depart from me into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”   (Matthew 25:41-46)

People are crying out for justice. Jesus will provide it. We are reminded of what God said through the Prophet Ezekiel:

I will feed them with justice.   (Ezekiel 34:16)

Are we ready for his justice? It may come swiftly.

Are we ready to worship Jesus in his millennial reign? Those who are are those who are doing so now. Our hearts will determine what kingdom we are in. Jesus is King of kings and Lord of lords. Let us  lift our  voices in the praise. The psalmist wrote:

Come, let us sing to the Lord;
let us shout for joy to the Rock of our salvation.

Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving
and raise a loud shout to him with psalms.

For the Lord is a great God,
and a great King above all gods.   (Psalm 95:1-3)

Satan’s kingdom is a perishing one. The kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ is an everlasting one. It is right at our door:

“Surely I am coming soon.”

Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!   (Revelation 22:20)

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Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 28

Track 1: The Character of God

Judges 4:1-7
Psalm 123
1 Thessalonians 5:1-11
Matthew 25:14-30

Before Israel had kings, judges sat under God’s authority to help govern the people. One such judge was Deborah. We read today’s Old Testament:

At that time Deborah, a prophetess, wife of Lappidoth, was judging Israel. She used to sit under the palm of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in the hill country of Ephraim; and the Israelites came up to her for judgment. She sent and summoned Barak son of Abinoam from Kedesh in Naphtali, and said to him, “The Lord, the God of Israel, commands you, ‘Go, take position at Mount Tabor, bringing ten thousand from the tribe of Naphtali and the tribe of Zebulun. I will draw out Sisera, the general of Jabin’s army, to meet you by the Wadi Kishon with his chariots and his troops; and I will give him into your hand.’”   (Judges 4:4-7)

Barak believed what Deborah said. He went to Mount Tabor. There he defeated Sisera. Why did he trust what Deborah instructed him to do. He knew that Deborah was a prophetess. He trusted the word of God.

We need leaders who listen to God and follow his instructions. How many of our politicians do that? How many of our church leaders do that?

In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus told the parable of the talents:

Jesus said, “It is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money. After a long time the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them. Then the one who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five more talents, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me five talents; see, I have made five more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ And the one with the two talents also came forward, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me two talents; see, I have made two more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ ”  (Matthew 25:14-30)

Notice in the parable how the master promoted those men who proved trustworthy. They were trustworthy because they trusted their master. This was not the case for one of the master’s servants:

Then the one who had received the one talent also came forward, saying, ‘Master, I knew that you were a harsh man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed; so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.   (Matthew 25:14-30)

Why did this servant fail? He did not trust the master. Perhaps did not have a relationship with the master. Perhaps did not understand the character of the master. This was the master’s response:

But his master replied, ‘You wicked and lazy slave! You knew, did you, that I reap where I did not sow, and gather where I did not scatter? Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and on my return I would have received what was my own with interest. So take the talent from him, and give it to the one with the ten talents. For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.   (Matthew 25:14-30)

It was not that the servant in the parable was unacquainted with the master. He worked for the master. But he did not know the master. He had a false concept of what the master was like.

Do we know the God we serve? Do we understand him enough to trust him? How many of us have a false concept of God. Many of our churches have not taught us who God really is. He is love. He is kind. He is merciful. Deborah knew this about God. She had a relationship with God.

We need some Deborah’s today in leadership. We need some Deborah’s in today’s church. We need some Deborah’s in our government. Maybe some of us should step up into a place of leadership. Is God calling us? Are we going to shrink back and bury our talents? Or are we going to be faithful with the gifts that God has given us? When we have proven ourselves faithful with a little, God will promote us. He will put us in charge of many things.

 

 

Track 2: Hiding Our Treasure

Zephaniah 1:7,12-18
Psalm 90:1-8, (9-11), 12
1 Thessalonians 5:1-11
Matthew 25:14-30

Our life is a great gift from God. The psalmist wrote:

The span of our life is seventy years,
perhaps in strength even eighty;
yet the sum of them is but labor and sorrow,
for they pass away quickly and we are gone.

Who regards the power of your wrath?
who rightly fears your indignation?

So teach us to number our days
that we may apply our hearts to wisdom.   (Psalm 90:10-12)

Our lives depend on the breath of God. We are to value them. Do we realize that we are God’s treasure? He has given us some of his essence. He has invested in us. God must judge iniquity, but He has given us his Son Jesus to secure our salvation. By the stripes of Jesus we are being made whole and well.

The Apostle Paul has called us children of the light:

When they say, “There is peace and security,” then sudden destruction will come upon them, as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and there will be no escape! But you, beloved, are not in darkness, for that day to surprise you like a thief; for you are all children of light and children of the day; we are not of the night or of darkness. So then let us not fall asleep as others do, but let us keep awake and be sober; for those who sleep sleep at night, and those who are drunk get drunk at night. But since we belong to the day, let us be sober, and put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation. For God has destined us not for wrath but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him. Therefore encourage one another and build up each other, as indeed you are doing.   (1 Thessalonians 5:3-11)

We are children of the God’s divine light. Jesus said:

“You are the light of the world. A city built on a hill cannot be hid. No one after lighting a lamp puts it under the bushel basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all in the house.   (Matthew 5:14-15)

Are we to hide our light from the world? That is what Satan wants us to do. He wants us to forget who we are in Christ. He wants us to live in fear. In today’s Gospel reading Jesus told this parable:

Jesus said, “It is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money. After a long time the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them. Then the one who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five more talents, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me five talents; see, I have made five more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ And the one with the two talents also came forward, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me two talents; see, I have made two more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ Then the one who had received the one talent also came forward, saying, ‘Master, I knew that you were a harsh man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed; so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.   (Matthew 25:14-30)

Why did this one man hide the investment that his master made in him? Perhaps he did not realize what he had been given he was. It was a moderate one, but it was a stepping stone to a bigger one. All he had to do was to trust the generosity of the master.

But apparently he did not understand the nature and character of his master. He hid has gift. Are we hiding our gift? Has Satan convinced us that God is a harsh master? Are we afraid of doing the wrong thing? Those are religious fears. But Christianity is not a religion. It is a way of life that is ever expanding. Day by day we grow in God’s grace. But we must stay planted in his soil. He must remain to his word. We must hold on to the hope that is within us that God has given us.

We must not allow fear to take over our lives. The Apostle John wrote:

Love has been perfected among us in this: that we may have boldness on the day of judgment, because as he is, so are we in this world. There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear; for fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not reached perfection in love. We love because he first loved us.   (1 John 4:17-19)

God is perfecting us in love. Only he can do it. Satan is not goinh to steal away our inheritance in Christ. Let us not forget hte true nature of God. Jesus said:

“Do not be afraid, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.”  (Luke 12:32)

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