Category Archives: Lenten daily readings

Daily Lenten Readings

Lenten reflections are offered for each of the daily readings listed in the Revised Common Lectionary for the Season of Lent. These are in addition to the Sunday and Holy Day homilies.

To access these reflections press the word  LENT in the top heading above and then scroll down.

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Wednesday in the Second Week of Lent

The Potter’s House

Has this ever happened to you? You come up with a game plan that seems right. To carry it out you realize that you will have to sell it to others. However, it could be a difficult sell if those others were not invited to give their input on the plan. This was true for James and John, the sons of thunder:

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came to him with her sons, and kneeling before him, she asked a favor of him. And he said to her, “What do you want?” She said to him, “Declare that these two sons of mine will sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your kingdom.” But Jesus answered, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?” They said to him, “We are able.” He said to them, “You will indeed drink my cup, but to sit at my right hand and at my left, this is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”

When the ten heard it, they were angry with the two brothers.   (Matthew 20:20–24)

Do we often make plans in a vacuum, mistakenly believing that we are in charge of our own destiny? This was the house of Israel:

The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: “Come, go down to the potter’s house, and there I will let you hear my words.” So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel. The vessel he was making of clay was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel, as seemed good to him.

Then the word of the Lord came to me: Can I not do with you, O house of Israel, just as this potter has done? says the Lord. Just like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand, O house of Israel.   (eremiah 18:1–7)

Our ultimate destiny lies in the hands of God. King David discovered this was so. He wrote:

But as for me, I have trusted in you, O Lord.
I have said, “You are my God.

My times are in your hand;
rescue me from the hand of my enemies,
and from those who persecute me.   (Psalm 31:14-15)

When we learn to trust God we then find great comport and peace in living under his loving care and direction. Fear enters into our lives when we believe we are in charge and have to make things happen.

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Monday in the Second Week of Lent

Forgive Us As We Have Forgiven Others

Daniel, the great prophet and prayer warrior, has set an example for us in how to pray and intercede for a nation.

“Ah, Lord, great and awesome God, keeping covenant and steadfast love with those who love you and keep your commandments, we have sinned and done wrong, acted wickedly and rebelled, turning aside from your commandments and ordinances. We have not listened to your servants the prophets, who spoke in your name to our kings, our princes, and our ancestors, and to all the people of the land.   (Daniel:9:4-6)

Daniel was a holy man by the standards of his day. Yet Daniel identified with those Israelites who rebelled against God. He did not hold himself apart. The psalmist pleaded for Israel as well, appealing to God’s mercy, but he did not overlook his sin or that of the nation.

Remember not our past sins;
let your compassion be swift to meet us;
for we have been brought very low.

Help us, O God our Savior, for the glory of your Name;
deliver us and forgive us our sins, for your Name’s sake.   (Psalm 79:8-9)

How do we pray? Do we judge ourselves more highly than others? Jesus warned against this:

“Do not judge, and you will not be judged; do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap; for the measure you give will be the measure you get back.”   (Luke 6:37-38)

God does not need our lecture prayers, telling him what he must do. He is looking for a broken and contrite heart. If we want to intercede for others as well as ourselves, then we must stop judging others. All judgment belongs to God. The way to stop judging people is to forgive them. Jesus tells us that we must forgive even our enemies:

“But I say to you that listen, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you.   (Luke 6:27–28)

 

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Saturday in the First Week of Lent

Covenant Keeping

The children of Israel are a covenant people. God made great promises to them which would be fulfilled as long as they kept his commandments:

This very day the Lord your God is commanding you to observe these statutes and ordinances; so observe them diligently with all your heart and with all your soul. Today you have obtained the Lord’s agreement: to be your God; and for you to walk in his ways, to keep his statutes, his commandments, and his ordinances, and to obey him. Today the Lord has obtained your agreement: to be his treasured people, as he promised you, and to keep his commandments; for him to set you high above all nations that he has made, in praise and in fame and in honor; and for you to be a people holy to the Lord your God, as he promised.   (Deuteronomy 26:16–19)

As Christians we are also a covenant people. We are in-grafted into the promises God made to Israel by our faith in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Our covenant with God is better than the Old Covenant that God made with Abraham. Nonetheless, we are still required to live by faith as was Abraham.

Yes, we have great promises and blessings, but with them come responsibilities. Living by faith means trusting in Jesus to supply us with grace to help us to keep the commandments of God. In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus made it very clear that we are to obey all the commandments from the heart. He said:

Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.   (Matthew 5:48)

We have not been given a blank check to live any way we want. Our Covenant with God under the blood of Jesus does not cover deliberate sin:

If we deliberately keep on sinning after we have received the knowledge of the truth, no sacrifice for sins is left, but only a fearful expectation of judgment and of raging fire that will consume the enemies of God.   (Hebrews 10:26-27)

Do we consider ourselves a treasured people, holy to God? If so, we will find great joy in keeping the commandments as God supplies us with his grace.

Happy are they whose way is blameless,
who walk in the law of the LORD!

Happy are they who observe his decrees
and seek him with all their hearts!   (Psalm 119:1–2)

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