Category Archives: Lent

Third Sunday in Lent

The Wisdom of God

In order for us to grasp God’s plan for our salvation we need to understand his wisdom. Worldly wisdom will never understand his plan. The Apostle Paul wrote:

The message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written,

“I will destroy the wisdom of the wise,
and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”   (1 Corinthians 1:18-19)

The key to understanding God’s plan is the cross. It it the very foundation of God’s wisdom. The Pharisees did not understand this. They relied on their own wisdom. They held on to their interpretation of Mosaic Law. But they failed to understand even the law.

The very essence of the Law is that God must be first in our lives. In Exoodus we read

I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery; you shall have no other gods before me.   (Exodus 20:1-2)

The Pharisees replaced God with their own gods. They understood that they must obey the law, but deep now they must have realized that they failed. So they redefined the to be set of rules that they thought they could follow. They made up the rules which they used to judge whether or not someone else was following their rules properly. What they failed to understand was the purpose of why the law was given by God.

The law was powerless to produce righteousness. The Apostle Paul wrote:

 as it is written:

“There is no one who is righteous, not even one;
    there is no one who has understanding,
        there is no one who seeks God.   (Romans 3:10-11)

The law was given so that we might understand what sin is. Again, Paul wrote:

Now before faith came, we were imprisoned and guarded under the law until faith would be revealed. Therefore the law was our disciplinarian until Christ came, so that we might be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer subject to a disciplinarian, for in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith.   (Galatians 3:23-26)

The law was our schoolmaster. It pointed out the problem. It could not solve the problem. The fulfillment of the law came only through Jesus. Jesus said:

“Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished.   (Matthew 5:17-18)

Jesus fulfilled the law by the cross. He lived the righteous life that God, the Father, required of us. And he bore our sins upon the cross and took the punishment for them which we deserved. He became our Temple by making a sacrifice for our sins once and for all. In today’s Gospel we find Jesus cleansing the Temple by throwing out the money changers:

The Jews then said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” The Jews then said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?” But he was speaking of the temple of his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.   (John 2:18-22)

The cross was and is both the wisdom and power of God. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.   (1 Corinthians 1:20-24)

The Pharisees were governed by a “worldly” wisdom, which was not a wisdom at all. It is a wisdom promised to us by Satan. He told Eve that if she ate the fruit of the tree of knowledge she would be wise, like God. This was a lie. The Apostle Paul contrasted the wisdom of God and of the world.

Yet among the mature we do speak wisdom, though it is not a wisdom of this age or of the rulers of this age, who are doomed to perish. But we speak God’s wisdom, secret and hidden, which God decreed before the ages for our glory. None of the rulers of this age understood this; for if they had, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory.   (1 Corinthians 2:6-8)

The best that the worldly wisdom could do was to “crucify the Lord of glory.”

Which wisdom are we operating from today? The world’s or God’s? We need to ask ourselves: Are we attempting to lesson the requirements of God’s law? We need the law to help us grasp the wisdom of God’s plan. In Proverbs we read:

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight.   (Proverbs 9:10)

We need to take sin seriously. The law teaches us that much.

Are we keeping score on others as did the Pharisees? This is a sure sign that we are missing the meaning of the cross. The cross was for Jesus to bear. But if we are to fully understand the power of the cross to defeat sin, we must understand that we have a cross to bear as well. Jesus said:

Then he said to them all, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it.   (Luke 9:23-24)

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Second Sunday in Lent

The Power of the Cross

God made a covenant with Abraham which still applies to Christian believers, even to this day. Reading from Genesis:

When Abram was ninety-nine years old, the Lord appeared to Abram, and said to him, “I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless. And I will make my covenant between me and you, and will make you exceedingly numerous.” Then Abram fell on his face; and God said to him, “As for me, this is my covenant with you: You shall be the ancestor of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be Abram, but your name shall be Abraham; for I have made you the ancestor of a multitude of nations.    (Genesis 17:1-7)

A covenant implies that both parties have conditions which must be meet. In the Abrahamic Covenant, God would bless Abraham and make him the ancestor of a multitude of nations. But God had a requirement for Abraham. God said: Walk before me, and be blameless.

What does it mean to be blameless? There was a time when the Apostle Paul claimed to be blameless. Writing in Philippians:

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.   (Philippians 3:4-6)

For the promise that he would inherit the world did not come to Abraham or to his descendants through the law but through the righteousness of faith. If it is the adherents of the law who are to be the heirs, faith is null and the promise is void. For the law brings wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there violation.   (Romans 4:13-14)

Paul writes that covenant depended upon the faith of Abraham and not on the requirements of the law of Moses:

It depends on faith, in order that the promise may rest on grace and be guaranteed to all his descendants, not only to the adherents of the law but also to those who share the faith of Abraham (for he is the father of all of us, as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”) —in the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist. Hoping against hope, he believed that he would become “the father of many nations,” according to what was said, “So numerous shall your descendants be.” He did not weaken in faith when he considered his own body, which was already as good as dead (for he was about a hundred years old), or when he considered the barrenness of Sarah’s womb. No distrust made him waver concerning the promise of God, but he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, being fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised. Therefore his faith “was reckoned to him as righteousness.” Now the words, “it was reckoned to him,” were written not for his sake alone, but for ours also. It will be reckoned to us who believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead, who was handed over to death for our trespasses and was raised for our justification.   (Romans 4:16-25)

Abraham believed in the promises of God no matter the circumstances. His faith was unshakable. He did not allow his own desires to dictate hi actions.

Do we have the faith of Abraham today? Reading from today’s Gospel of Mark:

He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”   (Mark 8:31-38)

If we are to truly follow Jesus, then we must be able to deny ourselves. We must deny ourselves. That is our cross. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Live by the Spirit, I say, and do not gratify the desires of the flesh. For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other, to prevent you from doing what you want. But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law.  And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.   (Galatians 5:5,17-18,24)

The law of Moses pointed out our sin, but it was powerless to help us overcome sin. Attempting to keep the law as a modern day Pharisee denies the power of the cross. The law cannot make us blameless. Only Jesus can do that through the power of the cross. Paul wrote:

And you who were once estranged and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through death, so as to present you holy and blameless and irreproachable before him— provided that you continue securely established and steadfast in the faith, without shifting from the hope promised by the gospel that you heard, which has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven.   (Colossians 1:21-23)

Discipleship in Christ cots us something. It coasts us our lives as we know them. Abraham gave his all to God. Do we stand alongside Abraham today?

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First Sunday in Lent

A Good Conscience

As we begin the Season of Lent, we are reminded of the forty days in which Jesus was in the wilderness, preparing for his earthly ministry. There he was tempted by the Devil to give it all up and take the easy rout out. The Gospel of Mark quickly covers this event with little commentary. Nonetheless, the wilderness experience of Jesus is the traditional setting for examining our own wilderness experience and preparation for ministry and daily life in the Faith.

We  often focus on disciplines during Lent, in the interest of helping to eradicate of certain sinful practices in our lives. The question for us today is how do we best do that. Today’s appointed scriptures seem to address that question directly. We look at two covenants which God made with humankind. The first one is from Genesis:

God said to Noah and to his sons with him, “As for me, I am establishing my covenant with you and your descendants after you, and with every living creature that is with you, the birds, the domestic animals, and every animal of the earth with you, as many as came out of the ark. I establish my covenant with you, that never again shall all flesh be cut off by the waters of a flood, and never again shall there be a flood to destroy the earth.”   (Genesis 9:8-11)

God had eradicated evil from the earth by eradicating the evil people through the great flood, saving only Noah and his family.

The second covenant began at the start of Jesus’ ministry. Reading from Mark:

Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.”  (Mark 1:9-11)

What was this good news? God was going to eradicate the power of sin in our lives. The only penalty for that sin would be borne by Jesus alone, on a cruel cross. How do we participate in what Jesus is accomplishing in our lives. The psalmist wrote:

Show me your ways, O Lord,
and teach me your paths.

Lead me in your truth and teach me,
for you are the God of my salvation;
in you have I trusted all the day long.

Remember, O Lord, your compassion and love,
for they are from everlasting.

Remember not the sins of my youth and my transgressions;
remember me according to your love
and for the sake of your goodness, O Lord.   (Psalm 25:3-6)

We need God’s help. The Apostle Paul explored how to eradicate the power the sin in his life lives. Reading from Roman:

For I know that nothing good dwells within me, that is, in my flesh. I can will what is right, but I cannot do it. For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do. Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I that do it, but sin that dwells within me.

So I find it to be a law that when I want to do what is good, evil lies close at hand. For I delight in the law of God in my inmost self, but I see in my members another law at war with the law of my mind, making me captive to the law of sin that dwells in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death?   (Romans 7:18-24)

Was Paul, so to speak, trying to give up a few things for Lent? If so, he was not succeeding. He was saying that he could not overcome sin by his effort. Our intentions may be good, but we have little ability to carry them out. Ever have trouble with New Year’s resolutions? We may be able to give up some small things during Lent, but that is often met with limited success.

How does God eradicate the power of sin in our lives? The Apostle Peter wrote:

Christ also suffered for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, in order to bring you to God. He was put to death in the flesh, but made alive in the spirit, in which also he went and made a proclamation to the spirits in prison, who in former times did not obey, when God waited patiently in the days of Noah, during the building of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight persons, were saved through water. And baptism, which this prefigured, now saves you– not as a removal of dirt from the body, but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has gone into heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him.   (1 Peter 3:18-22)

Peter is comparing the two covenants we mentioned. The second one has to do with our conscience. Jesus removed all our guilt on the cross. But Satan, who is “the accuser of the brethren,” is constantly reminding us of our slip ups. His plan is to burden our conscience and in so doing cause us to lose faith.

What do we do about that? The Apostle John wrote:

This is how we know that we belong to the truth and how we set our hearts at rest in his presence: If our hearts condemn us, we know that God is greater than our hearts, and he knows everything.   (1 John 3:19-20)

The good news is that God’s understanding of reality is not dependent on our understanding. He bases his evaluation of us through the blood of his Son. Not only that, he offers us a way to clear our conscience. The Apostle John wrote:

If we confess our sins, God who is faithful and just will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.   (1 John 1:9)

God does the cleaning. We cannot clean ourselves. We can confess our sins and we can pray for help in overcoming our sins. And we can allow ourselves to be discipled. The psalmist write:

Your word I have hidden in my heart,
That I might not sin against You.   (Palm 119:11)

The first covenant with Noah, dealt with the flesh. The second covenant deals with the Spirit. During this Season of Lent, will we try hard to eliminate certain sins in our lives and end up in frustration. Or will we follow the example of the Apostle Paul, who struggled with his flesh. He then overcame his struggle by the power of the Spirit through the blood of Jesus. He turned the whole struggle over to Jesus. Jesus has won the victory for us. Paul wrote:

Thanks be to God, who delivers me through Jesus Christ our Lord!    (Romans 7:25)

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Ash Wednesday

Remember That You Are Dust

Ash Wednesday is traditionally a day of fasting and repentance. In many liturgical churches ashes are placed on the foreheads of each participant. Ashes were a sign of penitence in the Ancient Near East, particularly in Judaism.

Recall this example from the Old Testament. Jonah preached to Nineveh that God was going to destroy the city and the people listened:

So the people of Nineveh believed God, and proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth, from the greatest of them even to the least of them. For word came unto the king of Nineveh, and he arose from his throne, and he laid his robe from him, and covered him with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. And he caused it to be proclaimed and published through Nineveh by the decree of the king and his nobles, saying, Let neither man nor beast, herd nor flock, taste any thing: let them not feed, nor drink water: But let man and beast be covered with sackcloth, and cry mightily unto God: yea, let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the violence that is in their hands.  (Jonah 3:5-8)

Notice that the King of Nineveh decreed that the people must turn from evil. God is never impressed with meaningless rituals.

Jesus said, “Beware of practicing your piety before others in order to be seen by them; for then you have no reward from your Father in heaven.   (Matthew 6:1)

As a campus minister I remember a particular Ash Wednesday service when a school official who wanted to know at what precise time I would be doing the “imposition of ashes” (making the customary sign of the cross in ashes on a person’s forehead). She did not want to sit through the scripture readings, homily, or prayers. The mere sign of the cross on her forehead would prove that she had done her religious duty.

Let us consider these instructive words of Jesus?

And whenever you fast, do not look dismal, like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces so as to show others that they are fasting. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that your fasting may be seen not by others but by your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you. (Matthew 6:16-18)

We cannot impress God with our rituals or our piety. Why should we try to impress others who must also stand before His throne, as we are required? God is calling us to a holy fast – one in which we come before Him in true repentance.

Yet even now, says the Lord,
return to me with all your heart,

with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning;
rend your hearts and not your clothing.

Return to the Lord, your God,
for he is gracious and merciful,

slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love,
and relents from punishing.  (Joel 2:12-13)

The Ash Wednesday service serves as a reminder of who we are and whose we are. Man was created out of dust by the hand of God. Our lives are sustained by His very breath. One day His breath will be taken away and we will have to give an accounting to Him of how we lived our lives.

Ash Wednesday is a check to the triumphant Christians who have arrived and no longer need to acknowledge their sins before God. It questions the “once saved, always saved” mentality.

Meaningless ritual? It might be for some. The act of fasting and repentance was not meaningless to the King of Nineveh. Jesus did not say that we should not fast. He said that we should not make a show of it. If we do, we may receive approval by some, but not by God. God looks at the heart.

If we say that we do not need any formal type of confession because our sins are washed in the blood of Jesus we may be missing the point of confession. From the First Epistle of John:

If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.   (1 John 1:8-9)

If we say that we have given our heart to Jesus and yet deliberately sin, how should our God judge our act of contrition? The Book of Hebrews has the answer:

For if we willfully persist in sin after having received the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, but a fearful prospect of judgment, and a fury of fire that will consume the adversaries.   (Hebrews 10:26-27)

Ash Wednesday offers us an opportunity for fasting and repentance. Perhaps we should take it?

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