Category Archives: Lent

Third Sunday in Lent, Year C

This Is My Name Forever

God had a special purpose for Moses. He had watched over Moses and protected him, preparing him for an encounter that we read about today. From the Book of Exodus:

Then Moses said, “I must turn aside and look at this great sight, and see why the bush is not burned up.” When the Lord saw that he had turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, “Moses, Moses!” And he said, “Here I am.” Then he said, “Come no closer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.” He said further, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.” And Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.   (Exodus 3:3-6)

God called out to Moses. When Moses discovered that God was the one who was calling him, he hid his face. We are made in the image of God, but we are not God. God’s presence can be overwhelming.

We remember God’s call to Isaiah when the prophet exclaimed:

“Woe is me! I am lost, for I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips; yet my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!”   (Isaiah 6:5)

God has been calling many of us. He has been calling us all our lives. Are we ready for our encounter with him? We may think that we already know God. That was true of Job. But Job had his encountered God, he discovered another whole dimension of God. God has a question for Job:

“Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth?
    Tell me, if you have understanding.
Who determined its measurements—surely you know!
    Or who stretched the line upon it?   (Job 38:4-5)

We do not have encounters with God without a reason. God had a specific plan and purpose for Moses. Moses was called to deliver the Israelites from slavery in Egypt and lead them to a new land which God had promised to give to the descendants of Abraham.

Moses protested against his call with several excuses. His first excuse was –  “Who am I?” God has to tell Moses that it is not about who he is but who God i. Again, from Exodus:

But Moses said to God, “If I come to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” God said to Moses, “I am who I am.” He said further, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘I am has sent me to you.’” God also said to Moses, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you’:

This is my name forever,
and this my title for all generations.”   (Exodus 3:13-15)

Do we understand who the one is who calls us? His name is “Yahweh.” He is the great “I AM.”

He never had a beginning. Nobody made God. God simply is. He did not come into being because he is being. God is absolute reality. There is no reality before him. God will always be.

God is utterly independent. He depends on nothing to bring him into being or support him or counsel him or make him what he is. Everything that is not God depends totally on God. We live only by his breath.

God is constant. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. He cannot be improved. He is not becoming anything. He is who he is.

God brings us into being and sustains our lives. He calls us and gives us a ministry. It may seem too much for us, and it is. But with God all things are possible. He stands behind and supports us in all that he asks us to do.

How do we respond to him. We might say that we have not had an encounter with God. God is always at the ready. Are we now ready to listen. This Lenten Season offers us an opportunity to focus on God. He wants us to know who he is. He wants us to understand how great he is. He wants us to experience the power of his name.

From the Book of Proverbs:

The name of the Lord is a strong tower;
    the righteous run into it and are safe.   (Proverbs 18:10)

God wants us to run to him. He has heard all the excuses before. Why would we waste his time with our excuses? The psalmist wrote:

O God, you are my God; eagerly I seek you;
my soul thirsts for you, my flesh faints for you,
as in a barren and dry land where there is no water.

Therefore I have gazed upon you in your holy place,
that I might behold your power and your glory.   (Psalm 63:1-2)

Are we still hesitant to approach God? Do we not know who he is and what he can do? He is without limit. God is calling us. God is ready to empower us. He is ready to bless us. He has called us to produce good fruit for his kingdom.

Jesus told the parable of the barren fig tree:

“A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.'”   (Luke 13:5-9)

Moses tried to resist God at first, but, ultimately became the law giver. He was, perhaps, the greatest figure in the Old Testament. He was great because God was with him. He learned to trust God and walk daily with him.

God has been patient with us. But now is the time to fulfill our destiny. Now is the time to bear fruit. Now is the time to allow God to glorify himself through us. Amen.

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Wednesday in the Second Week of Lent

The Potter’s House

Has this ever happened to you? You come up with a game plan that seems right. To carry it out you realize that you will have to sell it to others. However, it could be a difficult sell if those others were not invited to give their input on the plan. This was true for James and John, the sons of thunder:

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came to him with her sons, and kneeling before him, she asked a favor of him. And he said to her, “What do you want?” She said to him, “Declare that these two sons of mine will sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your kingdom.” But Jesus answered, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?” They said to him, “We are able.” He said to them, “You will indeed drink my cup, but to sit at my right hand and at my left, this is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”

When the ten heard it, they were angry with the two brothers.   (Matthew 20:20–24)

Do we often make plans in a vacuum, mistakenly believing that we are in charge of our own destiny? This was the house of Israel:

The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: “Come, go down to the potter’s house, and there I will let you hear my words.” So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel. The vessel he was making of clay was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel, as seemed good to him.

Then the word of the Lord came to me: Can I not do with you, O house of Israel, just as this potter has done? says the Lord. Just like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand, O house of Israel.   (eremiah 18:1–7)

Our ultimate destiny lies in the hands of God. King David discovered this was so. He wrote:

But as for me, I have trusted in you, O Lord.
I have said, “You are my God.

My times are in your hand;
rescue me from the hand of my enemies,
and from those who persecute me.   (Psalm 31:14-15)

When we learn to trust God we then find great comport and peace in living under his loving care and direction. Fear enters into our lives when we believe we are in charge and have to make things happen.

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Monday in the Second Week of Lent

Forgive Us As We Have Forgiven Others

Daniel, the great prophet and prayer warrior, has set an example for us in how to pray and intercede for a nation.

“Ah, Lord, great and awesome God, keeping covenant and steadfast love with those who love you and keep your commandments, we have sinned and done wrong, acted wickedly and rebelled, turning aside from your commandments and ordinances. We have not listened to your servants the prophets, who spoke in your name to our kings, our princes, and our ancestors, and to all the people of the land.   (Daniel:9:4-6)

Daniel was a holy man by the standards of his day. Yet Daniel identified with those Israelites who rebelled against God. He did not hold himself apart. The psalmist pleaded for Israel as well, appealing to God’s mercy, but he did not overlook his sin or that of the nation.

Remember not our past sins;
let your compassion be swift to meet us;
for we have been brought very low.

Help us, O God our Savior, for the glory of your Name;
deliver us and forgive us our sins, for your Name’s sake.   (Psalm 79:8-9)

How do we pray? Do we judge ourselves more highly than others? Jesus warned against this:

“Do not judge, and you will not be judged; do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap; for the measure you give will be the measure you get back.”   (Luke 6:37-38)

God does not need our lecture prayers, telling him what he must do. He is looking for a broken and contrite heart. If we want to intercede for others as well as ourselves, then we must stop judging others. All judgment belongs to God. The way to stop judging people is to forgive them. Jesus tells us that we must forgive even our enemies:

“But I say to you that listen, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you.   (Luke 6:27–28)

 

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Saturday in the First Week of Lent

Covenant Keeping

The children of Israel are a covenant people. God made great promises to them which would be fulfilled as long as they kept his commandments:

This very day the Lord your God is commanding you to observe these statutes and ordinances; so observe them diligently with all your heart and with all your soul. Today you have obtained the Lord’s agreement: to be your God; and for you to walk in his ways, to keep his statutes, his commandments, and his ordinances, and to obey him. Today the Lord has obtained your agreement: to be his treasured people, as he promised you, and to keep his commandments; for him to set you high above all nations that he has made, in praise and in fame and in honor; and for you to be a people holy to the Lord your God, as he promised.   (Deuteronomy 26:16–19)

As Christians we are also a covenant people. We are in-grafted into the promises God made to Israel by our faith in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Our covenant with God is better than the Old Covenant that God made with Abraham. Nonetheless, we are still required to live by faith as was Abraham.

Yes, we have great promises and blessings, but with them come responsibilities. Living by faith means trusting in Jesus to supply us with grace to help us to keep the commandments of God. In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus made it very clear that we are to obey all the commandments from the heart. He said:

Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.   (Matthew 5:48)

We have not been given a blank check to live any way we want. Our Covenant with God under the blood of Jesus does not cover deliberate sin:

If we deliberately keep on sinning after we have received the knowledge of the truth, no sacrifice for sins is left, but only a fearful expectation of judgment and of raging fire that will consume the enemies of God.   (Hebrews 10:26-27)

Do we consider ourselves a treasured people, holy to God? If so, we will find great joy in keeping the commandments as God supplies us with his grace.

Happy are they whose way is blameless,
who walk in the law of the LORD!

Happy are they who observe his decrees
and seek him with all their hearts!   (Psalm 119:1–2)

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