Category Archives: Feast Day

Saint Mark, Evangelist

saint-mark-1621Repent and Believe

The evangelist Mark was a traveling companion of Peter. He recorded Peter’s sermons and stories found in the Gospel of Mark. It is clear that Mark’s Gospel was written by a masterful storyteller. Though short, this Gospel has great impact and clarity. In the opening of his Gospel he gets right to the point:

In those days Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. And just as he was coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens torn apart and the Spirit descending like a dove on him. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

And the Spirit immediately drove him out into the wilderness. He was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan; and he was with the wild beasts; and the angels waited on him.

Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.”  (Mark 1:9-15)

Notice that Mark’s Gospel is an action Gospel. It moves quickly and it asks us to move along with it.

Mark was a great evangelist who got right to the point. The Apostle Paul gives us a perception on the importance of evangelism when he speaks about God’s gifts to the Church:

The gifts he gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until all of us come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to maturity, to the measure of the full stature of Christ.   (Ephesians 4:11-13)

The evangelist follows the apostles and prophets in importance. Often times they are thought of as shallow or not very sophisticated. For Mark, the Gospel was simple: Repent and believe. That is the starting point for every Christian and should be the essential message of the Church. Too many of today’s “seeker” churches have forgotten this message.

Mark was willing to risk everything for the sake of telling the Gospel message. Ultimately, he paid the price with his life. What are we willing to risk today? Jesus told His disciples:

“Go into all the world and proclaim the good news to the whole creation. The one who believes and is baptized will be saved; but the one who does not believe will be condemned. And these signs will accompany those who believe: by using my name they will cast out demons; they will speak in new tongues; they will pick up snakes in their hands, and if they drink any deadly thing, it will not hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover.”  (Mark 16:15-20)

Are we prepared to join Mark? What will the Lord say about our feet?

How beautiful upon the mountains
    are the feet of the messenger who announces peace,
who brings good news,
    who announces salvation,
    who says to Zion, “Your God reigns.”
Listen! Your sentinels lift up their voices,
    together they sing for joy;
for in plain sight they see
    the return of the Lord to Zion.
Break forth together into singing,
    you ruins of Jerusalem;
for the Lord has comforted his people,
    he has redeemed Jerusalem.
The Lord has bared his holy arm
    before the eyes of all the nations;
and all the ends of the earth shall see
    the salvation of our God.   (Isaiah 52:7-10)

We are living in the last days. Evangelism is of paramount importance. There is little time for frills. At the very least we can earnestly pray for the rescue of all lost souls.

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Monday in Easter Week

phariseesGod’s Word is True

As we know, unlike the men, the women were quick to believe in the resurrection. The Jewish leaders realized the danger of Christian belief – and they took extraordinary steps to prevent this from happening. From the Gospel of Matthew:

Suddenly Jesus met Mary Magdalene and the other Mary and said, “Greetings!” And they came to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”

While they were going, some of the guard went into the city and told the chief priests everything that had happened. After the priests had assembled with the elders, they devised a plan to give a large sum of money to the soldiers, telling them, “You must say, `His disciples came by night and stole him away while we were asleep.’ If this comes to the governor’s ears, we will satisfy him and keep you out of trouble.” So they took the money and did as they were directed. And this story is still told among the Jews to this day.  (Matthew 28:9-15)

The tomb was empty. That was a fact. What was needed was a plausible explanation that the people might believe. Does this sound like today’s political games? Why must so much effort be made to obscure the truth? Because the truth is dangerous.

Peter was not known for political correctness:

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed the multitude, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. You that are Israelites, listen to what I have to say: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with deeds of power, wonders, and signs that God did through him among you, as you yourselves know– this man, handed over to you according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of those outside the law. But God raised him up, having freed him from death, because it was impossible for him to be held in its power.  (Acts 2:14,22-25)

Where is the bold leadership today that we need? As people of God let us be filled with the Spirit and set free from the fear of worldly people. Let us proclaim the truth of the Gospel with boldness. Jesus is risen from the dead. Truth is on the side of Christians. Only God’s word is true. The falsehood of this world is quickly passing away.

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Resurrection Sunday: Principal Service, Year C

The Resurrection of the Dead

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

What a discovery it must have been for the women whom God had chosen to be the first witnesses of the resurrection. From the Gospel of Luke we read:

On the first day of the week, at early dawn, the women who had come with Jesus from Galilee came to the tomb, taking the spices that they had prepared. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in, they did not find the body. While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men in dazzling clothes stood beside them. The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen. Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.”   (Luke 24:4-7)

The women  were asked a very important question by the angels who were at the tomb: “Why do you look for the living among the dead?” Jesus had defeated death. Death could not contain him. They were looking in the place where they expected to see Jesus. But they were looking in the wrong place. He was no longer there.

From Isaiah we read:

And he will destroy on this mountain
    the shroud that is cast over all peoples,
    the sheet that is spread over all nations;
    he will swallow up death forever.   (Isaiah 25:7-8)

A shroud had been cast over all people. This a covering that weighs us down. We can imagine an infinite life. It is something most people would want. But we cannot achieve it on our own. We eventually die.

Some are saying that our consciousness could morph into a computer chip somehow. Is there a way to become immortal? Humankind keeps search. What is standing in our way?

God had told Adam and Eve that they could eat fruit from any tree in Garden of Eden except one tree. If they ate of that tree they would die. We remember how Satan tricked Eve:

But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”   (Genesis 3:4-5)

Satan lied when he said she would not die, He enticed her to sin and sin is what caused death. Science looks for a wisdom around death. Satan promised we would have the wisdom of God. But our so-called wisdom falls short. We cannot defeat death.

Does science offer us hope of immortality? Can we discover the miracle cure that extends our lives indefinitely? Many people are looking in the wrong place. Such wishful thinking is really a denial of the consequences of sin. No one can solve the problem of death who does not first solve the problem of sin. Jesus has solved them both.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have died. For since death came through a human being, the resurrection of the dead has also come through a human being; for as all die in Adam, so all will be made alive in Christ. But each in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then at his coming those who belong to Christ. Then comes the end, when he hands over the kingdom to God the Father, after he has destroyed every ruler and every authority and power. For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. The last enemy to be destroyed is death.   (1 Corinthians 15:19-26)

Only Jesus can destroy death. He came into the world that death and the fear of death would be eradicated, along with the cause of death, which is our sin.

Today, are we looking for the living among the dead? This world is fleeting. It has no answers concerning death. Where are we looking for life? Are we looking to the one who promises us life, and life more abundantly?

Apostle Peter, by revelation from God, gained an understanding of the resurrection is for everyone. When God revealed to him that even Gentiles could be saved, he proclaimed:

They put Jesus to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”   (Acts 10:39-43)

The resurrection of Jesus Christ is the answer to death. The grave could not hold Jesus, nor can it hold us who believe in his resurrection.

The Lord has risen indeed! We have been chosen by God to make the same discovery of the women at the tomb. His tomb is empty. The only tomb left is a world without Jesus.

Are we still at the tomb or have we discovered that Jesus has risen from the dead? If we have, let us go and tell someone. Jesus has defeated sin, hell, and the grave. We are set free sin and death.

Alleluia!  The Lord is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed!  Alleluia!

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April 21, 2019 · 12:03 am

Maundy Thursday

The Lord’s Supper

For Christians, Passover is fulfilled on Good Friday when the blood of Jesus is sprinkled on our souls. Jesus is the prophetic fulfillment of the Jewish Passover. Jesus’ last supper with His disciples was not the Seder. It was not the Passover Meal. This was a time of preparation for the Passover. The Passover meal could not be served until the slaughtering of the lambs outside the city which would occur the next day, the same day Jesus would be slaughtered on the cross.

Jesus was doing something new with His disciples. He was proclaiming His death before it actually happened. He said that His body was broken and that His blood was shed. He was saying that He was the last lamb sacrificed for the sins of the people. He was the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world once and for all.

The Apostle Paul writes about this special meal in today’s Epistle Lesson:

For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took a loaf of bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way he took the cup also, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.  (1 Corinthians 11:23-26)

Jesus was asking His disciples to anticipate his crucifixion, participate in His suffering, and keep His sacrifice always in their memory. They would not just be remembering with their minds what had happened but they would actually be partaking in the event themselves in a spiritual way. John’s Gospel speaks of both the power and the necessity of the Communion service.

Jesus said to them, “Very truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise them up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in them. Just as the living Father sent me and I live because of the Father, so the one who feeds on me will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven. Your ancestors ate manna and died, but whoever feeds on this bread will live forever.”   (John 6:53-58)

Today, we are invited by our Lord to anticipate His power entering into our lives more and more as we participate His Holy Communion. We are asked to do more than just remember a historical event. We are asked to come with great expectation. In order to fully experience the resurrection we must also enter into Jesus’ death through our confession of sins. This is our opportunity to once more die to our sins that we might be empowered to live a resurrected life on this earth until He comes again.

After Communion Jesus gave His disciples a new commandment. Jesus said that by this commandment His disciples would demonstrate the resurrected life:

“Now the Son of Man has been glorified, and God has been glorified in him. If God has been glorified in him, God will also glorify him in himself and will glorify him at once. Little children, I am with you only a little longer. You will look for me; and as I said to the Jews so now I say to you, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come.’ I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”   (John 13:31-35).

To love as Jesus loved is to be empowered as Jesus was empowered by the Holy Spirit. The Holy Communion has been given to us by our Lord to teach, experience, and practice the presence of the Lord so that we may be empowered to keep His commandment. As we empty ourselves and take on more of Him, we become a living witness of His resurrection.

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