Monthly Archives: March 2021

Wednesday in Holy Week

Betrayal

Betrayal, what can we say about it? One of the definitions of betrayal is “to reveal or disclose in violation of confidence.” In order to betray someone the betrayer must first gain a confidence the betrayed and avoid suspension. This may have been true for Judas, at least there the other disciples of Jesus were concerned. But this was not the case for Jesus, He knew who Judas was and what he was about to do. He was teaching his disciples about servanthood, then he suddenly changed the subject:

When Jesus had said this, He was troubled in His spirit and testified, ” I assure you: One of you will betray Me!”

The disciples started looking at one another—uncertain which one He was speaking about. One of His disciples, the one Jesus loved, was reclining close beside Jesus. Simon Peter motioned to him to find out who it was He was talking about. So he leaned back against Jesus and asked Him, “Lord, who is it?”

Jesus replied, “He’s the one I give the piece of bread to after I have dipped it.” When He had dipped the bread, He gave it to Judas, Simon Iscariot’s son. After [Judas ate] the piece of bread, Satan entered him. Therefore Jesus told him, “What you’re doing, do quickly.”   (John 13:21-27)

Judas was part of Jesus’ inner circle. He was entrusted with the common purse. None of the disciples would have suspected Judas of being a betrayer.  They were evidently surprised when Jesus said that one of them would betray Him.

Why would Judas do such a thing? We can only speculate. Perhaps he thought that he knew and understood more than Jesus. We are told to pray for those in authority, not to undermine then because we may think that we have all the answers and they are not following our advice. Jesus addressed this type of pride with his disciples on the very night he was betrayed.

A better question might be: Why do we betray Jesus? We may say that we never would have betrayed Jesus. If so, we put ourselves in Peter’s camp. He told Jesus that he never would, yet he denied Jesus three times before the cock crowed twice. Circumstances in life can put us under tremendous pressure. It is hard to say how we might respond under such pressure. If we are relying on our own strength then the chances are that our faith may fail us.

How serious is betrayal? Jesus said:

“Everyone who acknowledges me before others, I also will acknowledge before my Father in heaven; but whoever denies me before others, I also will deny before my Father in heaven.   (Matthew 10:32-33)

We need the testimony of Jesus before the Father. And he needs our testimony. Jesus forgave Peter who had a repentant heart. He restored Peter and filled him with the power of his Holy Spirit. Peter learned that he needed to rely on the strength of God and not his own.

Judas became aware of his terrible mistake, but he did not repent. Let us remember to repent of our arrogance, misplaced devotions, and faithless faults. The Book of Hebrews reminds us:

Since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight and the sin that clings so closely, and let us run with perseverance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus the pioneer and perfecter of our faith, who for the sake of the joy that was set before him endured the cross, disregarding its shame, and has taken his seat at the right hand of the throne of God.

Consider him who endured such hostility against himself from sinners, so that you may not grow weary or lose heart.   (Hebrews 12:1-3)

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Tuesday in Holy Week

A Child of the Light

Holy Week reminds us of the contrast between darkness and light. Darkness was all around Jesus but He continued to radiate the light and love of God. The message that He wanted to convey to His disciples was that they should choose the light over darkness:

Then Jesus told them, “You are going to have the light just a little while longer. Walk while you have the light, before darkness overtakes you. Whoever walks in the dark does not know where they are going. Believe in the light while you have the light, so that you may become children of light.”  (John 12:35-36)

We have been called  by Jesus to walk as children of the light. Young children are often open and trusting, particularly if they are raised in a loving environment. When we get older we become more aware of our shortcomings and we may be tempted to hide them. We may want others to see through us because we know that we are not altogether pure. The Pharisees made it a practice of diverting the gaze of others from them by compounding rules that others would not be able to keep. They created darkness to obscure that fact that they were not walking in the light themselves.

While we have Jesus we should walk in Him. He extends His hand to us but we must grasp it. Though He warned the Pharisees they would not listen. All anyone can do without Jesus is a coverup. Yet darkness is only a temporary covering. Ultimately, it is no solution at all. Why should we depend upon deception when we can depend upon the truth of God? The truth of God is that he loves us and our sin has been covered by the blood of Jesus.

God’s light does not come by our good deeds. Our light is a gift and a promise which God made through the Prophet Isaiah:

“It is too light a thing that you should be my servant
to raise up the tribes of Jacob
and to restore the survivors of Israel;
I will give you as a light to the nations,
that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.”   (Isaiah 49:6)

Jesus was and is that light. Are we will to walk with as children of the light? The psalmist wrote:

For you are my hope, O Lord God,
my confidence since I was young.

I have been sustained by you ever since I was born;
from my mother’s womb you have been my strength;
my praise shall be always of you.

I have become a portent to many;
but you are my refuge and my strength.

Let my mouth be full of your praise
and your glory all the day long.   (Psalm 71:5-8)

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Monday in Holy Week

How Priceless Is Your Love, O God!

The psalmist wrote:

How priceless is your love, O God!
your people take refuge under the shadow of your wings.

They feast upon the abundance of your house;
you give them drink from the river of your delights.

For with you is the well of life,
and in your light we see light.   (Psalm 36:7-9)

At the beginning of Holy Week we have the example of love and devotion of Mary of Bethany, to the Lord Jesus. She was the sister of Lazarus, whom Jesus raised from the dead. She understood the priceless love of God:

Mary took a pound of costly perfume made of pure nard, anointed Jesus’ feet, and wiped them with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume. But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii and the money given to the poor?” (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.) Jesus said, “Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial.  (John 12:3-7)

Mary must have been spiritually aware of what was about to take place. Perhaps she had an awareness that many of the disciples of Jesus did not have. Judas wanted to distract others from what she was doing. That is a primary way in which the enemy operates.

We may do “good works” by giving to the poor, provided our motives are pure. (Judas Iscariot’s motives were not.) Nevertheless, our good works will not purify us. If we ignore the passion and purpose of Jesus we will greatly miss the mark.

We read in the Book of Hebrews:

When Christ came as a high priest of the good things that have come, then through the greater and perfect tent (not made with hands, that is, not of this creation), he entered once for all into the Holy Place, not with the blood of goats and calves, but with his own blood, thus obtaining eternal redemption. For if the blood of goats and bulls, with the sprinkling of the ashes of a heifer, sanctifies those who have been defiled so that their flesh is purified, how much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to worship the living God!

For this reason he is the mediator of a new covenant, so that those who are called may receive the promised eternal inheritance, because a death has occurred that redeems them from the transgressions under the first covenant.   (Hebrews 9:11-15)

Jesus offered himself to God on our behalf. What are we prepared to offer him? Mary offered her all.

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Holy Week

The Way of the Cross

One of the meanings of holy is “set apart.” Let us set apart an entire week – Holy Week – to recall the events surrounding the suffering, death, and Resurrection of Jesus. Let us also set ourselves apart for this week as well.

During the very week of our Lord’s Passion, James and John made a special request of Jesus:

Then James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to him. “Teacher,” they said, “we want you to do for us whatever we ask.”

“What do you want me to do for you?” he asked.

They replied, “Let one of us sit at your right and the other at your left in your glory.”

“You don’t know what you are asking,” Jesus said. “Can you drink the cup I drink or be baptized with the baptism I am baptized with?”

“We can,” they answered.

Jesus said to them, “You will drink the cup I drink and be baptized with the baptism I am baptized with, but to sit at my right or left is not for me to grant. These places belong to those for whom they have been prepared.”  (Mark 10″35-40)

What strange baptism is Jesus talking about in His response to James and John. He is speaking about the “way of the cross.”

“I have come to bring fire on the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled! But I have a baptism to undergo, and what constraint I am under until it is completed! Do you think I came to bring peace on earth? No, I tell you, but division.  (Luke 12:49-51)

During this Holy Week, let us reflect upon what this baptism means for each of one us. The Apostle Paul wrote:

We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life.  For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly also be united with him in a resurrection like his. For we know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body ruled by sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves to sin — because anyone who has died has been set free from sin. (Romans 6:4-7)

So if you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth, for you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is your life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory.  (Colossians 3:1-4)

We look forward to the resurrection and the celebration of Easter. But have we died with Him? Are we a living sacrifice unto the LORD? Have we enter the way of the cross? If we have not then we do not fully understand the meaning of our baptism. We must die and our life must be hidden in Him. Otherwise, we may ask the same inappropriate question of James and John. Many in the church still do, even to this day. We will soon be celebrating the resurrection of our Lord, but there would have been no resurrection without the crucifixion.

Let us declare as did the Apostle Paul:

I have been crucified with Christ; and it is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.    (Galatians 2:19-20)

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