Daily Archives: February 28, 2021

Second Sunday in Lent

The Power of the Cross

God made a covenant with Abraham which still applies to Christian believers, even to this day. Reading from Genesis:

When Abram was ninety-nine years old, the Lord appeared to Abram, and said to him, “I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless. And I will make my covenant between me and you, and will make you exceedingly numerous.” Then Abram fell on his face; and God said to him, “As for me, this is my covenant with you: You shall be the ancestor of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be Abram, but your name shall be Abraham; for I have made you the ancestor of a multitude of nations.    (Genesis 17:1-7)

A covenant implies that both parties have conditions which must be meet. In the Abrahamic Covenant, God would bless Abraham and make him the ancestor of a multitude of nations. But God had a requirement for Abraham. God said: Walk before me, and be blameless.

What does it mean to be blameless? There was a time when the Apostle Paul claimed to be blameless. Writing in Philippians:

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.   (Philippians 3:4-6)

For the promise that he would inherit the world did not come to Abraham or to his descendants through the law but through the righteousness of faith. If it is the adherents of the law who are to be the heirs, faith is null and the promise is void. For the law brings wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there violation.   (Romans 4:13-14)

Paul writes that covenant depended upon the faith of Abraham and not on the requirements of the law of Moses:

It depends on faith, in order that the promise may rest on grace and be guaranteed to all his descendants, not only to the adherents of the law but also to those who share the faith of Abraham (for he is the father of all of us, as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”) —in the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist. Hoping against hope, he believed that he would become “the father of many nations,” according to what was said, “So numerous shall your descendants be.” He did not weaken in faith when he considered his own body, which was already as good as dead (for he was about a hundred years old), or when he considered the barrenness of Sarah’s womb. No distrust made him waver concerning the promise of God, but he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, being fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised. Therefore his faith “was reckoned to him as righteousness.” Now the words, “it was reckoned to him,” were written not for his sake alone, but for ours also. It will be reckoned to us who believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead, who was handed over to death for our trespasses and was raised for our justification.   (Romans 4:16-25)

Abraham believed in the promises of God no matter the circumstances. His faith was unshakable. He did not allow his own desires to dictate hi actions.

Do we have the faith of Abraham today? Reading from today’s Gospel of Mark:

He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”   (Mark 8:31-38)

If we are to truly follow Jesus, then we must be able to deny ourselves. We must deny ourselves. That is our cross. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Live by the Spirit, I say, and do not gratify the desires of the flesh. For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other, to prevent you from doing what you want. But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law.  And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.   (Galatians 5:5,17-18,24)

The law of Moses pointed out our sin, but it was powerless to help us overcome sin. Attempting to keep the law as a modern day Pharisee denies the power of the cross. The law cannot make us blameless. Only Jesus can do that through the power of the cross. Paul wrote:

And you who were once estranged and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through death, so as to present you holy and blameless and irreproachable before him— provided that you continue securely established and steadfast in the faith, without shifting from the hope promised by the gospel that you heard, which has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven.   (Colossians 1:21-23)

Discipleship in Christ cots us something. It coasts us our lives as we know them. Abraham gave his all to God. Do we stand alongside Abraham today?

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