First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday

The Fullness of God

If the world needs anything today it needs the fullness of God. The Church needs the fullness of God. I need the fullness of God. We all need all of God. What does this mean?

A group of ladies came to my door. I won’t say which church denomination they were from. I invited them in and they began to explain to me that Jesus was not God, but that Jesus was just God’s Son. I asked them to interpret for me the beginning of the Gospel of John:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.   (John 1:1-5)

John loved and knew Jesus. He was given special insight concerning our Lord and, fortunately, he wrote them down for us. Is Jesus really God? Scripture tells us that Jesus is the agent of creation. All things were made through him.

Let us take a closer look at the creation. From the first chapter of Genesis:

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.  (Genesis 1:1-3)

The Hebrew word for “moved” means brooded or hovered over, as when a mother bird broods over her eggs to bring forth life. The Holy Spirit of God was waiting for the command to bring forth life. He very much has a part in the creation as well. Is the Holy Spirit God also?

Later in Genesis we have an account of God creating the human race. God says:

“Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”   (Genesis 1:26)

To whom is God talking to when he says “let us”? He is speaking to members of the Holy Trinity. He is speaking to himself. God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, in divine cooperation, was creating the universe and all life.

What is this Holy Trinity? Some might say that it was just a creation of the Council of Nicaea  in AD 325. Nicaea was the first council in the history of the Christian church that was intended to address the entire body of believers. It was convened by the emperor Constantine to resolve the controversy of whether or not Christ is divine or just another created being. The council opined that Jesus was and is divine. He is part of the God-head.

Let us examine today’s appointed readings. From the Gospel of Mathew:

The eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”   (Matthew 28:16-20)

Was not Jesus commissioning his disciples to baptize new converts of the faith in the name of God – all of God – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?

The Apostle Paul, in today’s Epistle, blessed the Church at Corinth in this way:

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.

Paul wanted the people to be blessed by all of God. And today we need all of God. For each personality of God has a specific ministry in our lives. When one aspect of God’s ministry is misunderstood, overlooked, or downplayed,  the door may be left open for division within the Church. One denomination might stress one thing and another denomination another. We need a unified faith, but we need to start out with a unified God.

We may hear of the God of the Old Testament and the God of the New. Are these two different Gods? In the Old Testament God gives his commandments to Moses. In the Gospels Jesus makes it clear that he did not come to set aside the law, but to fulfill it:

Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished. Therefore, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches others to do the same, will be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.   (Matthew 5:17-20)

God is a just God who cannot overlook sin. He is also a God of mercy because the punishment for our sin was taken on the cross by his Son. Jesus fulfilled the law by living a perfect life for us. Not only that, but he eradicated by his sacrifice. When we identify with Jesus we may claim his perfect life for ourselves. How so? We must confess our sins. We must accept, with thanksgiving, his great sacrifice and embrace him as Lord of our lives. The Apostle Paul writes:

If anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation;   (2 Corinthians 5:17-18)

When we proclaim Jesus as our Savior, we crucify our old self and are born anew in him by the Spirit. What about any new sin that we might commit? The Apostle Paul writes:

Should we continue in sin in order that grace may abound? By no means! How can we who died to sin go on living in it? Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.   (Romans 6:1-4)

The Holy Spirit of God brings us newness of life. How so? Paul writes:

Walk in the Spirit, and you shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh. For the flesh lusts against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh; and these are contrary to one another, so that you do not do the things that you wish.  But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not under the law.   (Galatians 5:16-18)

The Trinity of God tells us that God is not divided. He is one, but he has different ministries that we need for growth and maturity in Christ. God is a divine unity of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The wonderful news in the Gospel message is that God invites us into a divine unity with him.

 Jesus prayed for his disciples and for those who would come after them, that all would be guided into unity with Him and the Father:

“I do not pray for these alone, but also for those who will believe in Me through their word; that they all may be one, as You, Father, are in Me, and I in You; that they also may be one in Us, that the world may believe that You sent Me. And the glory which You gave Me I have given them, that they may be one just as We are one: I in them, and You in Me; that they may be made perfect in one, and that the world may know that You have sent Me, and have loved them as You have loved Me.   (John 17:20-23)

To enter into the fullness of God we must accept the fullness of God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We must allow the fullness of God to minister to our souls. God’s whole nature and desire is to rescue us from sin and bring us into the abundant life that Jesus has promised us. Today, are we fully open to the fullness of God? Do we want to be joined together with him in the fullness of his being? If so, God invites us into himself. How can we refuse such a glorious invitation.

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Filed under Eucharist, Gospel, homily, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Trinity Sunday, Year A

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