Day of Pentecost

I Will Pour out My Spirit on All Flesh

Today we celebrate the birth of the Church. We mark it as an historical event, and that it is – very significant one. Reading from Acts 2:

When the day of Pentecost had come, the disciples were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.   (Acts 2:1-4)

Clearly something supernaturally was happening. The Apostle Peter began preaching concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus. He ended up by saying:

Therefore let the entire house of Israel know with certainty that God has made him both Lord and Messiah, this Jesus whom you crucified.”   (Acts 2:36)

Many of Peter’s listeners was moved by the Spirit:

Now when they heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and to the other apostles, “Brothers, what should we do?” Peter said to them, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is for you, for your children, and for all who are far away, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to him.”    (Acts 2:37-39)

Peter said the promise was for his listeners, but also for those who are far away. What was the promise? Peter quoted the Prophet Joel:

In the last days it will be, God declares,

that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,
and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,

and your young men shall see visions,
and your old men shall dream dreams.

Even upon my slaves, both men and women,
in those days I will pour out my Spirit;
and they shall prophesy.   (Acts 2:17-18)

The promise was the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. Was this a onetime experience? Not in the Early Church. We read in the Book of Acts that the apostles were arrested for performing a healing by the Holy Spirit. When they were later released they gathered for prayer:

When they had prayed, the place in which they were gathered together was shaken; and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke the word of God with boldness.   (Acts 4:31)

There were manifestations of the outpouring of the Spirit, both on the Day of Pentecost and throughout the the buddEarly Church. The Apostle wrote about them to the Church in Corinth:

Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of services, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who activates all of them in everyone. To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good. To one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the discernment of spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. All these are activated by one and the same Spirit, who allots to each one individually just as the Spirit chooses.   (1 Corinthians 12:4-11)

But this was the Apostolic Age, some might say. It is not for today. Is the Holy Spirit doctrinal or dynamic? Jesus told Nicodemus :

The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”   (John 3:8)

The Spirit is like the wind. Is it under our control” No, the wind blows where it chooses.

Let us look at an Old Testament outpouring of the Spirit. God asks Moses to gather 70 elders and bring them to the tent of meeting:

So Moses went out and told the people the words of the Lord; and he gathered seventy elders of the people, and placed them all around the tent. 25 Then the Lord came down in the cloud and spoke to him, and took some of the spirit that was on him and put it on the seventy elders; and when the spirit rested upon them, they prophesied. But they did not do so again.   (Numbers 11:24-25)

The tent of meeting was not the only place where this outpouring occurred, however:

Two men remained in the camp, one named Eldad, and the other named Medad, and the spirit rested on them; they were among those registered, but they had not gone out to the tent, and so they prophesied in the camp. And a young man ran and told Moses, “Eldad and Medad are prophesying in the camp.” And Joshua son of Nun, the assistant of Moses, one of his chosen men, said, “My lord Moses, stop them!” But Moses said to him, “Are you jealous for my sake? Would that all the Lord‘s people were prophets, and that the Lord would put his spirit on them!”   (Numbers 11:26-30)

Do we have any Eldad’s and Medad’s in our churches today? Joshua thought they were not allowed in his day. They did not follow protocol. Does the spirit follow our protocol or does our protocol follow the Spirit? As ministers of the Gospel are we free to say, along with Moses: “Would that all the Lord‘s people were prophets, and that the Lord would put his spirit on them!” ?

Jesus spelled out the protocol:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water.” Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive; for as yet there was no Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified.   (John 7:37-39)

Jesus was glorified on the cross. He paid a great price so that we could receive the Holy Spirit. Are we thirsty?

This Sunday we celebrate an historical event. We celebrate the birth of the Church. Let us also celebrate an outpouring of the Holy Spirit today and pray for a rebirth of the Church as we welcome the Spirit into our own hearts. God has not finished with us yet. That should not keep us from celebrating Jesus’s victory over the cross, the grave, and Hell. God wants to wash over us and release in us a spring of living water.

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Filed under Day of Pentecost, Eucharist, Feast Day, Gospel, Holy Day, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon development, Year A

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