Daily Archives: April 19, 2020

Second Sunday of Easter

The Covenant of Reconciliation:

The Apostle Thomas is remembered as “Doubting Thomas.” That may be a little unfair. To be sure, he was a skeptic concerning the resurrection of Jesus:

Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with the other disciples when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”   (John 20:24-25)

On the other hand, Thomas had been faithful as a disciple. He was willing to sacrifice for what he believed was the cause of Christ. When Jesus spoke about going to Jerusalem, which proved to be his last trip there, Thomas was aware of the danger involved:

Then Thomas said to the rest of the disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”   (John 11:16)

To be sure, Thomas was missing something. First, he missed being there when Jesus appeared to his disciples. He was also missing out on a new status which God had decreed from him, at   status made possible by the death and resurrection of his Son. Thomas was missing the new birth about which Peter would soon preach:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! By his great mercy he has given us a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, who are being protected by the power of God through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, even if now for a little while you have had to suffer various trials, so that the genuineness of your faith — being more precious than gold that, though perishable, is tested by fire– may be found to result in praise and glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.  (1 Peter 1:3-7)

From a worldly point of view, Thomas was a good man. Jesus said the greatest man was John the baptist:

Truly I tell you, among those born of women no one has arisen greater than John the Baptist; yet the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.   (Matthew 11:11)

Who could be greater than John the baptist? That could be you or me. John had not yet received the new birth because Jesus had not yet risen from the dead. But we have been born after the resurrection. We have an opportunity to enter into the kingdom of God. How do we do that? Let us see how Thomas did that:

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”   (John 20:26-31)

Having seen Jesus now after his resurrection, Thomas makes his affirmation of faith. That same affirmation is open to us. The Apostle Peter writes:

Although you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy, for you are receiving the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.   (1 Peter 1:8-9)

Believing in the resurrection is the gateway to the new birth. The Apostle Paul writes:

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ and gave us the ministry of reconciliation: that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them. And he has committed to us the message of reconciliation. We are therefore Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us. We implore you on Christ’s behalf: Be reconciled to God. God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.   (2 Corinthians 5:17-21 NIV)

Before the resurrection the people of God were temporarily forgiven through their confession of sin and the making of sacrifices. But they were never reconciled to God. They did not have peace with God. They were still estranged from him.

Now our sins have been forgiven though the cross and resurrection. Jesus has paid the price for our sins once and for all. We are given a new status. We have the opportunity of living in an eternal relationship with God. Is Jesus our Lord and our God? That is what Thomas said after he believed. The Apostle Paul writes:

If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.   (Romans 10:9-10)

Almighty and everlasting God, who in the Paschal mystery established the new covenant of reconciliation: Grant that all who have been reborn into the fellowship of Christ’s Body may show forth in their lives what they profess by their faith; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

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