Daily Archives: February 23, 2020

Last Sunday after Epiphany

Come up to the Mountain

The psalmist wrote:

O send out your light and your truth; let them lead me; let them bring me to your holy hill and to your dwelling.   (Psalm 43:3)

Moses received a call from God to come to his holy hill:

The Lord said to Moses, “Come up to me on the mountain, and wait there; and I will give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction.”   (Exodus 24:12)

Then Moses went up on the mountain, and the cloud covered the mountain. The glory of the Lord settled on Mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it for six days; on the seventh day he called to Moses out of the cloud. Now the appearance of the glory of the Lord was like a devouring fire on the top of the mountain in the sight of the people of Israel. Moses entered the cloud, and went up on the mountain.   (Exodus 24:15-18)

Jesus received a similar call:

Jesus took with him Peter and James and his brother John and led them up a high mountain, by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. Then Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good for us to be here; if you wish, I will make three dwellings here, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” While he was still speaking, suddenly a bright cloud overshadowed them, and from the cloud a voice said, “This is my Son, the Beloved; with him I am well pleased; listen to him!”    (Matthew 17:1-5)

Martin Luther King received a call to come up to the mountain. In his last speech he exclaimed:

Well, I don’t know what will happen now. We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn’t matter with me now. Because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land. And I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

There is glory on the mountain – God’s glory. A person is changed on the mountain of God. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. 18 And all of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another; for this comes from the Lord, the Spirit.   (2 Corinthians 3:17-18)

The mountain top experience is not about our agenda. It is a divine appointment to hear the plan of God for our lives that conforms to his purpose. We are not called to celebrate our mountain top experiences or to boast about them. We are called rather to receive guidance and strength to do what would otherwise be impossible.

We have to come back down to the mountain to face the challenges ahead. Moses came down to witness a full-fledged mutiny. The Rev. King came down to face assassination. Jesus came down to fact the cross. The mountain top does not shelter us from tribulation. It prepares us to follow our Lord at any cost.

But God calls only extraordinary people to come up to this mountain. No! Mose, Peter, James, John, and Martin Luther King were ordinary people who answered an extraordinary call. Call is calling us as well.

There is a day coming when everyone who desires will be able to hear directly from God. Isaiah prophesied:

Many peoples will come and say, “Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the temple of the God of Jacob. He will teach us his ways, so that we may walk in his paths.” The law will go out from Zion, the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.   (Isaiah 2:3)

This prophecy has to do about the millennial reign of Christ. Until that day, we must soldier on in a fallen world that desperately needs to hear a message from God that he has given us to speak. But first we must be willing to come up to the mountain of the Lord. He is calling us. The psalmist wrote:

Proclaim the greatness of the Lord our God
and worship him upon his holy hill;
for the Lord our God is the Holy One.   (Psalm 99:9)

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